The number with the power to halt the climate crisis

June 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The number with the power to halt the climate crisis

Wonky as it sounds, the social cost of carbon holds the key to crafting policies that avoid harm from greenhouse gas emissions.

Read more from the original source:
The number with the power to halt the climate crisis

Transportation drives uptick in emissions in Europe

June 4, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Transportation drives uptick in emissions in Europe

As European voters demand action on climate, EU greenhouse gas emissions rose by .7 percent in 2017 compared to the previous year.

Read the original here:
Transportation drives uptick in emissions in Europe

Your favorite playlist has a carbon footprint

May 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Your favorite playlist has a carbon footprint

You would think streaming music is more eco-friendly than CDs, tapes and records, right? Afterall, there’s no waste. A new study by the Universities of Glasglow and Oslo calculated the carbon footprint associated with downloading and streaming music and the answer is surprising. According to data from 2015 and 2016, music streaming accounted for 200 to 350 million kilograms of greenhouse gas emissions . The study used data records from the Recording Industry Association of America. First, researchers took the total number of streamed and downloaded songs and multiplied it by the amount of electricity it takes to download 1 gigabyte of data. Each gigabyte is equivalent to the amount of electricity needed to light one light bulb for an hour. Next researchers investigated what kind of fuel sources are typically fueling music streaming sites— such as coal or renewable energy — and averaged the carbon dioxide emitted. Related: Music festivals and events can set the stage for sustainability The totals do not reflect the carbon footprint of data storage and processing centers, nor the electricity it takes to power your cellphone or steaming device, so the comprehensive contribution to greenhouse gas emissions is actually much higher than the study initially indicates. Music streaming giant, Spotify, did not respond to The Rolling Stone journalist’s request for comment, but they did publish a sustainability report in 2017, which promised to work toward carbon neutrality. By 2018, the new sustainability report indicated that they had closed almost all of their data centers and reduced their carbon footprint by 1,500 tons of carbon dioxide . In actuality, Spotify shifted to using Google Cloud services, which means that now Google data centers are responsible for the emissions, not that emissions have necessarily been cut. Streaming competitors Apple and Amazon have recently invested in renewable energy options for their centers. Data centers in general are responsible for 2 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, which is equivalent to the airline industry. Music lovers who want to be more sustainable should buy full albums rather than streaming individual songs, especially if you plan to hit that repeat button a lot. According to their calculations, streaming 27 songs uses more energy than manufacturing the disc. For those of you who can’t imagine hopping in a time machine and buying a CD again, the authors suggest that downloading songs for offline listening could reduce the associated energy consumption. Via Rolling Stone Image via PhotoMIX-Company

Read more here:
Your favorite playlist has a carbon footprint

Turning methane into carbon dioxide could help us fight climate change

May 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Turning methane into carbon dioxide could help us fight climate change

Methane is 84 times worse as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. What if we could chemically change methane into carbon dioxide?

See the original post:
Turning methane into carbon dioxide could help us fight climate change

A tale of two companies: Tesla, Ford and the need for long-term plans

May 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on A tale of two companies: Tesla, Ford and the need for long-term plans

How can we tell now if Tesla, Ford or any company is ‘future-fit’ when they don’t publicly disclose their long-term plans?

Read the original:
A tale of two companies: Tesla, Ford and the need for long-term plans

Tracking the relationship between the oil supermajors and climate change

March 29, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Tracking the relationship between the oil supermajors and climate change

The top five gas companies say that they’re investing in clean energy — but how true is that claim?

View post:
Tracking the relationship between the oil supermajors and climate change

Are you ready for Round 3 of the plastic waste trade war?

March 29, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Are you ready for Round 3 of the plastic waste trade war?

Plastic waste exporting countries will soon need the informed consent from recipient countries to import their waste.

Original post:
Are you ready for Round 3 of the plastic waste trade war?

The overlooked role of food banks in slashing emissions

March 29, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The overlooked role of food banks in slashing emissions

Food banks are helping to tackle hunger and prevent emissions equivalent to the annual carbon output of 2.2 million cars, a new report says.

Continued here:
The overlooked role of food banks in slashing emissions

Rwanda hopes to increase energy efficiency with new cooling initiative

February 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Rwanda hopes to increase energy efficiency with new cooling initiative

Rwanda has big plans for a more sustainable future and is launching a new cooling initiative that will increase energy efficiency within the country’s booming electricity sector. As part of the new plan, Rwanda hopes to provide a cooling solution for food storage and indoor spaces without adding to the world’s greenhouse gas problems. The new initiative, called Rwanda’s National Cooling Strategy, assessed the current need for cooling products as well as the future market. Although countries traditionally meet cooling needs with the use of modern refrigeration, Rwanda is looking towards more sustainable methods that do not use as much electricity . “Through the Rwanda Cooling Initiative, we have conducted a cooling market assessment, developed a national cooling strategy and minimum energy efficiency standards, and created financial tools to support businesses investing in clean cooling,” Rwanda’s Minister of Environment, Dr. Vincent Biruta, explained. Rwanda is currently witnessing some of the fastest growth in the electricity sector in all of Africa. With 12 million people to serve, the East African Country is already looking for energy efficient options to meets those needs. Related: Top 10 states for LEED green buildings in 2018  Fortunately, Rwanda has been a leader in adopting sustainable practices. In fact, the country was one of the first to ban the use of plastic bags. A few years ago, Rwanda hosted a global treaty that agreed to an amendment to the Montreal Protocol. The initiative decreased the use of certain chemicals that are popularly used in air conditioners and refrigerators. But combating the use of harmful chemicals is only half the battle. As part of the National Cooling Strategy, Rwanda hopes to boost energy efficiency by regulating how much electricity can be used by modern air conditioners and refrigerators. The country also plans to raise awareness about other cooling techniques, including natural ventilation and shading. The new plan is the first phase of Rwanda’s larger cooling initiative. If other countries follow Rwanda’s lead, a large amount of greenhouse gas emissions could be cut over the next decade. Some experts predict that we can curb global warming by as much as 0.4C if countries increase their energy efficiency. Via United Nations Environment Image via Tumisu

Read more: 
Rwanda hopes to increase energy efficiency with new cooling initiative

Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

February 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

Fast food is one of the most popular conveniences of modern society, but it comes at a huge risk to the environment. Amid growing concerns of agriculture and water risks, a group of global investors are putting pressure on the fast food industry to come up with a sustainable model to lower their footprint on the environment. The investors, who manage a combined $6.5 trillion, issued letters to six of the largest fast food chains in the United States. The letters asked the companies to explain their plan to reduce risks associated with meat and dairy products by the spring of 2019. The companies targeted include McDonald’s, Burger King, Domino’s Pizza, Chipotle Mexican Grills, Yum! Brands (Pizza Hut and KFC) and Wendy’s Co. There are over 80 investors who signed on to the initiative, which is also backed by the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR). The ICCR has a long track record of talking with fast food chains about environmental issues, such as water hazards and deforestation. Related: Prosecco production is destroying soil in some Italian vineyards “Every day around 84 million adults consume fast food in the U.S. alone, but the inconvenient truth of convenience food is that the environmental impacts of the sector’s meat and dairy products have hit unsustainable levels,” said Jeremy Coller, the head of Coller Capital, in a statement. One of the biggest issues with fast food restaurants is their dependency on agriculture, specifically the beef industry . With fast food continuing to rise in popularity, the demand for more beef has reached unsustainable levels. Not to mention, the severe impact the dairy industry has on the environment. To help combat the situation, the new initiative hopes to work with companies to reduce water waste and deforestation, as well as improve conditions in animal agriculture all across the board. Working together, companies in the fast food industry can improve the environment and help cut down on greenhouse gas emissions . It is unclear how the fast food companies have reacted to the letter. If they choose not to act and better the environment, experts predict the agricultural industry — which includes dairy and meat production — will account for around 70 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions within the next 30 years. Via Ceres Image via Shutterstock

Go here to read the rest:
Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1308 access attempts in the last 7 days.