Miranda Ballentine, Rocky Mountain Institute

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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Miranda Ballentine, Rocky Mountain Institute

Clay Nesler, Johnson Controls

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

GreenBiz Studio 

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Clay Nesler, Johnson Controls

Edgy black slats conceal a surprisingly light-filled interior in this Brisbane home

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Brisbane-based Bureau Proberts  designed a beautiful home whose wonderfully bright interior is completely concealed by its edgy black exterior. The Bardon House is clad in vertical black slats to provide the homeowners with the utmost privacy and shade from the harsh sun, but the interior is anything but dark. Illuminated by an abundance of natural light thanks to multiple windows and a large skylight in the roof, the interior is vibrant and airy. From the outside, the shape of three-story home mimics the surrounding landscape, gradually sloping to either side of the home. The resulting angular shape is continued throughout the interior where the large sloped ceilings create an open living space, which is flooded in natural light thanks to a large skylight installed at the apex of the ceiling. Most of the interior color scheme is neutral with natural white walls and grey tile flooring, but the windows and doors are framed in a beautiful dark-stained timber for contrast. Related: Elegant timber extension uses angular volumes to maximize natural light The main living area is located on the first floor while the bedrooms are located on the second level. From the living room, sliding glass doors open into beautiful open-air space courtyard filled with greenery . The architects describe the space as “a veranda-like thoroughfare, melding the courtyard with the landscape beyond.” The bottom level of the home has been designed as a social space, which leads out to the open-air terrace and pool area, further connecting the house to its natural surroundings. + Bureau Proberts Via Dwell Photography by Alicia Taylor

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Edgy black slats conceal a surprisingly light-filled interior in this Brisbane home

Scientists witnessed a neutron star mashup for the first time – and it transformed our understanding of the universe

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

For the first time, scientists have detected gravitational waves stemming from the crash of two ultra-dense neutron stars – and the event has spawned a new era of astronomy known as “multi-messenger astronomy.” It is believed that cataclysmic events such as these generated at least half of the gold in the Universe. Though astronomers have witnessed ripples in the fabric of space in time before (created by objects moving in the Universe), this is the first time in history the event was detectable by regular light telescopes. As a result, researchers have gained new insight into massive cosmic collisions. A neutron star is the burnt-out core of a massive star that ran out of fuel , blew up and died. Typically 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter, a neutron star is radioactive and has a mass slightly more dense than the sun in our solar system. Reportedly, a handful of neutron star material weighs as much as Mount Everest ! When two neutron stars combine, they spiral around each other, growing closer and closer over time. The spinning intensifies until the two objects revolve around each other several times per second. Then, a forceful impact takes place and a gargantuan gravitational wave is emitted into the Universe at the speed of light. On August 18th, astronomers witnessed the remains of a neutron star mash-up, which traveled 130 million light years before it was seen by Earthly detectors. The phenomena resulted in dozens of scientific papers being published in top academic journals. As Phys.org reports, the observation also solved several physics riddles – including how much of the universe’s gold , platinum, mercury and other heavy elements were formed. Related: Einstein’s gravitational wave theory proven by the sound of two black holes colliding Said co-discoverer Benoit Mours of France’s CNRS research institute, “We witnessed history unfolding in front of our eyes: two neutron stars drawing closer, closer… turning faster and faster around each other, then colliding and scattering debris all over the place.” Days before the highly-anticipated event, three different gravitational wave observatories based around the world picked up gravitational waves. Astronomers worked together to locate the area where the merger occurred. After narrowing it down to a very small patch in the southern sky, the US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) mobilized the rest of the astronomy community, reports The Verge. Within hours, thousands of astronomers searched the sky , eventually spotting the explosive leftovers of the neutron star mashup. Telescopes witnessed newly-forged material in the fallout. This confirmed that “maybe half, maybe more, of the heavy elements in the Universe are actually produced by this kind of collision,” said physicist Patrick Sutton, a member of LIGO. “This is a revolution in astronomy, of having thousands of astronomers focus on one source for weeks and having this collaboration unravel in seconds, in hours, then days, and weeks,” said Vicky Kalogera, an astrophysicist at Northwestern University and a LIGO collaborator. “For us, that’s the Holy Grail.” The development comes two years after the first gravitational wave was detected (also by LIGO). For the past century, astronomers have been trying to figure out how to detect the ripples, which were predicted by Albert Einstein in his theory of general relativity . Via Phys , The Verge Images via Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science , NSF LIGO Sonoma State University / A. Simonnet , Tony Piro, Carnegie Institution for Science

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Scientists witnessed a neutron star mashup for the first time – and it transformed our understanding of the universe

Harriet Langford, The Ray

October 16, 2017 by  
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Harriet Langford, The Ray

How a Minimalist Lifestyle Can Add to Your Green Efforts

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

You may have seen the term “minimalism” being thrown around … The post How a Minimalist Lifestyle Can Add to Your Green Efforts appeared first on Earth911.com.

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How a Minimalist Lifestyle Can Add to Your Green Efforts

Carbon pricing is becoming the norm for big companies

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Some firms are taking it more seriously than others, CDP reports, but the overall trend is unmistakable.

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Carbon pricing is becoming the norm for big companies

Packaging’s role in Walmart’s Project Gigaton

October 16, 2017 by  
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Noodling around with a hypothetical package of pasta sauce reveals the big impact of a single change of materials.

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Packaging’s role in Walmart’s Project Gigaton

SunEdison founder Jigar Shah dishes on a clean energy future

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. In this episode: Entrepreneur Jigar Shah explores the promise for a “brilliant” energy future.

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SunEdison founder Jigar Shah dishes on a clean energy future

Standing at the crossroads of the climate crisis

October 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Three simple, psychological ways to deal with society’s climate calamity. One of them leads to positive change. Which will you choose?

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Standing at the crossroads of the climate crisis

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