New York City’s "floating food forest" returns next month

March 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

If you missed it the last time around, Swale New York’s “floating food forest” will be giving visitors another chance to check out its vegetative bounty starting next month. Housed on an 80-foot-long barge, the 130-by-40-foot community garden will be making calls at Hudson River Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park, and the Bronx’s Concrete Plant Park from April 20 through November 15. The garden is free to tour—and free to harvest. Guests will be able to help themselves to a share of the mini farm’s crops, which in past iterations have included perennial favorites like cauliflower, broccoli, squash, peppers, kale, bok choy, ramps, zucchini, radicchio, and scallions. You may even find boughs laden with persimmons, bushes plump with blueberries, or trees hanging with bananas. Part farm, part art project, Swale is a response to laws that prohibit foraging for food on public lands. By taking to the water, however, the garden is bound by a different set of rules. Related: Come eat free food from this floating edible forest before it sets sail again 70 percent of the plants grown on the barge are edible. The others are to attract pollinators—including the bees that live in a repurposed piano—or keep pests away. Mary Mattingly, the artist who spearheaded the project, says that Swale brings us “one step closer to transforming our city from dependence on large-scale supply chains with little accountability.” Related: NYC’s first floating food forest to hit the Hudson River this summer She describes Swale as a “call to action” and a vision of New York City’s potential future. “By bringing together groups from varying backgrounds, we will create an environment that works together to find new ideas and answers to food security,” she said. Visitors are welcome to contribute to the garden with their own plants and seeds. It’s a joint effort, after all. “Together, we are re-imagining our city,” Mattingly added. + Swale New York

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New York City’s "floating food forest" returns next month

LEED Platinum housing development helps fight gentrification in Philadelphia

March 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Can architects design attractive homes for developing areas that won’t feed into gentrification ? That’s what Interface Studio Architects (ISA) set off to achieve with Folsom Powerhouse, a LEED Platinum -certified development in Philadelphia. Located in the city’s rapidly developing Francisville neighborhood, the Powerhouse scheme combines environmentally friendly features with community-minded design that encourages diversity, density, and social spaces. Made up of 31 units, Folsom Powerhouse provides single-family town homes , duplexes, and two small apartment buildings at a range of prices. Although all the living options are modern in construction, Folsom Powerhouse took inspiration from an old community feature—the stoop. To create attractive street-level social spaces, ISA created “super stoops,” a sequence of entry platforms in front of the homes large enough for impromptu gatherings with steps that double as seating. Artist Jenny Sabin was commissioned to create beautiful fabricated metal handrail panels to make the stoops even more attractive. Related: Energy-positive townhouses power Boston’s grid with renewable energy The Folsom Powerhouse’s facades are made up of a patchwork of corrugated metal, timber cladding, and energy-efficient windows. Green roofs that top the buildings manage stormwater, as do the rain gardens on the street level. The corner buildings are topped with solar panels that generate electricity for the development. + Interface Studio Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Sam Oberter

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LEED Platinum housing development helps fight gentrification in Philadelphia

Compelling new data on why we shouldn’t waste wastewater

March 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

In the face of shortages, water recycling and reuse strategies may be necessary to ensure business continuity.

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Compelling new data on why we shouldn’t waste wastewater

Circular water companies make a splash heard ‘round the world

March 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Apana, Shell and Veolia use circular principles to retain and recycle water used in farming, fracking and washing machines.

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Circular water companies make a splash heard ‘round the world

Entrepreneurs can help in the quest for safe drinking water

March 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Zero Mass Water is just one of the innovators providing access to safe, drinking water off the grid.

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Entrepreneurs can help in the quest for safe drinking water

Your relationship with fish is about to change

March 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

A wave of change is upending the seafood business as we know it. Here’s what it means for everyone from investors to fish stick aficionados.

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Your relationship with fish is about to change

India looks to microgrids to bridge the energy access gap

March 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The government has promised energy access to all households by 2019. Here are five issues to watch as India reaches for this ambitious target.

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India looks to microgrids to bridge the energy access gap

Inflatable spiky pinecone-shaped roofs top this forest resort in Latvia

March 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Spiky ETFE roofs  top this airy forest resort and spa in the historic region of Kurzeme, Latvia. 3GATTI Architecture Studio and OFL Architecture teamed up to design the Pinecones Resort using sustainable construction techniques and prefabrication , resulting in a fairytale-like woodland setting in harmony with its natural surroundings. The resort comprises cone-shaped units with inflatable roofs made from 100 percent recyclable ETFE that has a minimal carbon footprint . Lightweight and flexible, this material offers the possibility of creating dynamic building forms. The roofs will be inflated by a recyclable SPF sprayed eco foam with superior insulation and structural qualities. The laminated lightweight frames, made from locally-sourced wood, support the roof membrane and allows it to withstand snow loads. Related: Labyrinthine resort in Bangladesh lets nature take over The resort will focus on providing Blue Clay treatments based on organic and naturally abundant material. Different programs will be distributed across the site, with wooden bridges connecting the units housing winter tubs, saunas, therapy rooms and dining areas. In addition to the aforementioned sustainable features, the resort will also include a water filtration system, geothermal loops, and solar window technologies. + 3GATTI  + OFL Architecture Via Archdaily

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Inflatable spiky pinecone-shaped roofs top this forest resort in Latvia

Why food production doesn’t need to double by 2050

March 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

An agronomist’s straight talk on what it will really take for agriculture to sustain a growing global population.

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Why food production doesn’t need to double by 2050

10 minutes with Chelsea Davidoff, Paramount Pictures

March 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

On cinema, conversations and context-based sustainability.

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10 minutes with Chelsea Davidoff, Paramount Pictures

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