MAD Architects to transform an ancient Chinese courtyard into a kindergarten with a "floating roof"

November 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Beijing-based design practice MAD Architects has broken ground on the Courtyard Kindergarten, a striking adaptive reuse project that transform a traditional siheyuan courtyard from the 1700s into the site of a creative and colorful kindergarten. Located in Beijing, the project aims to preserve the cultural heritage of the site while injecting fresh life through the addition of new structures, including a “dynamic floating roof” that surrounds the historic courtyard. As with many of the firm’s projects, the design features curvaceous elements and is evocative of a Martian landscape. “There is a saying in old Beijing when children are naughty: ‘if you go three days without being punished, the roof will cave in,’” said MAD principal Ma Yansong of one of the inspirations behind the eye-catching rooftop , a place the firm describes as “full of magic — a playful escape for the children that is a symbol of freedom and endless imagination.” Designed as the primary space for children to engage in outdoor sports and activities, the multicolored floating roof will curve around the siheyuan’s existing hipped roofs and tree canopy and will also feature an undulating landscape of several small ‘hills’ and ‘plains.’ Classrooms, a library, a small theater and a gymnasium will be located below the roof in a new building with an open-plan layout that’s surrounded by walls of glass to let in ample natural light as well as views of greenery and the historic buildings next door. The building will also wrap around three existing ancient trees, creating miniature courtyards where children can connect with nature. The Courtyard Kindergarten will accommodate 400 children between the ages of two and five. Related: A 650-foot-long running track tops this space-saving elementary school in China The design aims to reconcile new and old elements, from the existing modern building on-site that was built in the 1990s to the nearly 400-year-old courtyard. Having just broke ground this month, the Courtyard Kindergarten is expected to be completed and operational in the fall of 2019. + MAD Architects Images via MAD Architects

Go here to see the original:
MAD Architects to transform an ancient Chinese courtyard into a kindergarten with a "floating roof"

Royal Caribbean’s creative workaround for onshore renewable energy procurement

November 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

It is pioneering a unique approach to marrying power purchase agreements and verified carbon offsets.

Read more from the original source:
Royal Caribbean’s creative workaround for onshore renewable energy procurement

The role of smart tech for planning smarter cities

November 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Sponsored: Measurabl explores how connecting smart tech and municipal planning can result in improved real-world services.

Read more here:
The role of smart tech for planning smarter cities

A tiny farmhouse in North Carolina is as energy-efficient as it is adorable

November 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

For those looking to get a taste of tiny home living, this charming, energy-efficient home located on a working farm outside of Winston-Salem, North Carolina is just for you. Despite its small stature, the Roost 18 is a sustainable powerhouse, complete with sheep’s wool insulation, energy-efficient kitchen appliances and a composting toilet. The adorable abode can be rented out on Airbnb starting around $88 per night. Located on the rolling hills of a historic farm just outside of downtown Winston-Salem, the Roost 18 is a dream getaway for anyone looking for a serene retreat in the country. The tiny farmhouse is clad in white wood panels with an itsy-bitsy but welcoming front porch. The black, A-frame roof pays homage to the many barns in the area. Related: Enjoy a mint julep on this tiny farmhouse’s charming front porch The living space offers a small bench for sitting and enjoying the views or simply snuggling up with a good book. The home is kept warm and toasty during the colder months thanks to the sheep’s wool insulation and the mini wood-burning stove. For added sustainable measures and to reduce waste, the kitchen was installed with energy-efficient appliances. The small bathroom, which has a stock tank tub for soaking, is installed with a composting toilet . The tiny home sleeps up to four guests, with one queen-sized bed in a sleeping loft and a fold-out sofa bed downstairs. The interior of the home benefits from plentiful windows that provide stellar views of the stunning natural surroundings. (According to the reviews on Airbnb, this is a prime spot to watch the sunset.) Better yet, guests can enjoy a stroll around the working farm, which has a number of free-roaming animals and historic farm buildings. + Perch and Nest Via Tiny House Talk Images via Perch and Nest

More: 
A tiny farmhouse in North Carolina is as energy-efficient as it is adorable

Impossible Burgers to hit grocery stores in 2019

November 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The Impossible Burger is a plant-based patty that bleeds and sizzles when it cooks, and for the past couple of years, you could only find it in restaurants . Made from the magic ingredient heme, an iron-containing compound that mimics a meaty flavor, this patty has a smaller environmental footprint than its beef counterpart, and it has become extremely popular since its debut in 2016. Starting next year, the beloved Impossible Burger might just find its way onto the shelves of a grocery store near you. In September, the Impossible Burger expanded from high-end restaurants and made its way to the fast-food chain  White Castle. But now, Impossible Foods has announced that it will bring the Impossible Burger to grocery stores in 2019. Related: White Castle is now offering ‘bleeding’ vegan Impossible Burger sliders “By far the No. 1 message from fans on social media is, ‘When will I be able to buy and cook the Impossible Burger at home?’” Impossible Foods’ CEO and founder Patrick Brown said in a statement. “We can’t wait until home chefs experience the magic and delight of the first plant-based meat that actually cooks and tastes like meat from animals — without any compromise.” If you are ready to fire up the grill and cook your own Impossible Burgers at home, you are going to have to hold off a bit longer. It isn’t clear when they will hit stores, and Impossible Foods says that it is not going to release any more details right now about the retail launch. It isn’t clear if the company will be introducing the burgers in stores nationwide, or if they will only be available in select markets. Consumers will just have to wait and see. You can currently find Impossible Burgers at 5,000 restaurants nationwide, and the company has sold more than 13 million burgers since the 2016 launch. Most reviews of the burger say that it isn’t exactly like a beef patty, but it is still the best veggie burger on the market. It gives consumers the same taste as a beef patty, but there is still a difference when it comes to texture. Impossible Foods said that producing the plant-based patty requires less than a quarter of the water and less than 5 percent of the land needed to make the same amount of ground beef from cows. It also generates less than an eighth of the greenhouse gas emissions. + Impossible Foods Images via Impossible Foods

See original here: 
Impossible Burgers to hit grocery stores in 2019

Skiing Green

November 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Skiing used to be considered the province of the elite, … The post Skiing Green appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the rest here:
Skiing Green

Everybody on board

November 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Life as a former chief sustainability officer involves helping guide several nonprofit. Here are some lessons learned.

The rest is here:
Everybody on board

American cities elected mayors who care about climate change

November 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

As local leaders increasingly take action on environmental issues, Americans reaffirmed that this mattered to them and their everyday lives.

View original here:
American cities elected mayors who care about climate change

You say you want a revolution: How changing mobility will make new cities

November 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

As infrastructure weathers and tech disrupts traditional transportation, we need a transition.

View original here:
You say you want a revolution: How changing mobility will make new cities

Everlane introduces long-lasting outerwear made from recycled water bottles

November 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

The ReNew outerwear line, launched in late October by Everlane , has yanked three million water bottles out of the waste stream and turned them into fibers for the venture. The new collection offers cleaner fashion in an industry known for heavy pollution and resource consumption. This first round of renewed clothing includes four fleece pullover options, six puffer jackets and three parkas. While other companies have edged toward the trend of incorporating recycled materials into their production, Everlane is taking it a step further. Everlane has vowed to eliminate all virgin plastic from its manufacturing processes by 2021 and instead will rely 100 percent on recycled materials . Furthermore, the company will eliminate all single-use plastics from corporate offices and retail store locations. It has also committed to the use of recycled bags when shipping merchandise. The commitment is a firm one, as evidenced by the process involved to turn plastic into usable fibers. First, the facility receives large bales of compressed plastic bottles that are sorted using a combination of human and machine efforts. After sorting, the bottles are ground down into tiny flakes and subsequently melted into molten plastic. Next, that plastic is sent through a machine that turns it into long strands and then dices the strands into crystals. Once they arrive at the spinning facility, those crystals are melted down once again, turned into thread and spun into yarn for fabrics. Related: Clothing made from recycled water bottles highlights the ongoing crisis in Flint In addition to the ReNew line aimed at conscientious material sourcing, Everlane offers sustainability with the goal for its products to last for decades. This is in steep contrast to many textile industry business plans that market trendy and disposable clothing to encourage consumers to constantly purchase the newest, flash-in-the-pan item. In addition, the company demands fair trade practices from the factories it works with and believes in ethical treatment of employees. In fact, all Black Friday profits are returned to the employees in some fashion. As a case in point, the 2018 profits are earmarked to build an organic farm on the campus of a facility in Vietnam, a country with otherwise excessive pesticide use that pollutes the food supply. + Everlane Via Treehugger Images via Everlane

More here:
Everlane introduces long-lasting outerwear made from recycled water bottles

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1984 access attempts in the last 7 days.