A Brazilian ‘bear cave’ brewery boasts several passive techniques to stay chill

July 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Summer visitors to searing São Paulo now have a new “bear cave” to cool off in with a cold, frothy craft brewski in hand. Designed by local firm SuperLimão Studio for Brazilian Colorado Brewery, the Toca do Urso Brewery, which is almost entirely embedded underground, uses several passive and vernacular techniques to create a pleasant microclimate achieved through natural ventilation and light, water collection and reuse, permeable floors and plenty of native vegetation. Located in the São Paulo neighborhood of Ribeirão Preto, the Toca do Urso Brewery offers beer-lovers a serene yet vibrant place to test out a wide selection of craft beers. From the start of the project, the architectural team from SuperLimão Studio knew that to create a comfortable spot that was energy-efficient , it would have to battle the extreme heat and humidity common to the region. Related: Eco-minded Melbourne brewery breaks the mold for sustainable beer production The first step in the design process was to create a space that would be partially embedded into the landscape, adding a natural insulating envelope that would cool down the interior throughout the year. Additionally, in going with a circular shape, the team would be able to create a continual system of natural ventilation. The exterior is made out of gabion walls comprised of rocks found on-site that add to the thermal comfort of the structure. In addition, these rock walls reduce sound levels so that when the hall is crowded, noise is directed to the outdoor area. Additionally, it blocks the traffic noise from the adjacent highway. A large, circular hall was buried almost 5 feet underground to create an ultra-tight earthen envelope. The land that was removed in the process was relocated to the front part of the structure and used to create a sloped entryway. Cold air is swept downward into the building to create a cool microclimate , which is enhanced further by the native vegetation that was planted in abundance to provide shade from the searing heat. Visitors enter the building through the sloped walkway, which leads into a covered patio with plenty of seating. Inside the hall, a massive skylight optimizes natural circulation and bathes the interior in sunlight . In the center of the brewery, there is a mirror of water and a set of canals. These canals lead air and water through grates in the floor so that the interior air is humidified by the water and in constant circulation, cooling down the interior significantly in comparison to the outdoor temps. In fact, the building’s various passive measures enable an internal temperature that is approximately 15? Celsius lower than the outside temps. + SuperLimão Studio Via ArchDaily Photography by Maíra Acayaba via SuperLimão Studio

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A Brazilian ‘bear cave’ brewery boasts several passive techniques to stay chill

TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky on the new reusability ecosystem

July 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky discusses a groundbreaking new approach to reusing packaging at scale.

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TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky on the new reusability ecosystem

Lynn Hoffman and Kate Davenport: The role of recycling in a regenerative and just economy

July 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

The co-presidents of a local non-profit social enterprise recycler explain their vision for the evolution of recycling and key role it can play in stabilizing the climate, creating strong local economies, and supporting healthy communities.

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Lynn Hoffman and Kate Davenport: The role of recycling in a regenerative and just economy

Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: r.cup

July 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Accelerate at Circularity 19 is a fast-pitch competition featuring entrepreneurs with innovative technologies, products and services advancing a circular economy. r.cup’s Michael Martin pitches from the main stage.

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Accelerate at Circularity 19: Fast-Pitch Competition: r.cup

Steel-framed treehouse slated for Malaysian national park

July 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Visitors to the Taman Tugu National Forest Park in Kuala Lumpur will soon have a playful steel observation tower to take in the immense tropical forest. Designed by Daniel Tiong, Nature’s Catalog consists of three cubed steel frames which interlock vertically to create multiple level, open-air platforms that rise up to through the tree canopy. Recently named the winner of the Greenovation Gazebo Design Competition, the Nature’s Catalog design will be installed along a newly opened forest trail in Malaysia’s National Forest Park, Taman Tugu. The location is an idyllic tropical stetting where hikers on the trail will be soon able to enjoy the beautiful views from the tree canopies. Related: Awesome two-story treehouse is half jungle gym and all childhood dream come true The observation tower is comprised of three steel cube-like framed with open sides, creating a series of open-air platforms that rise up vertically from the ground. To get to the structure, a roped off trail leads from the hiking path. A perforated split staircase leads visitors to the first level platform, which then rises up through the middle platform. There, a sunken courtyard provides a nice space for large groups. A fun cat ladder leads up to the top of the observation deck , allowing for prime views of the lush tropical landscape. The multiple platforms were all purposely laid out in tight configurations, and at differing heights, creating private reading or contemplation spaces, open terraces, as well as courtyards, reading areas, a meditation room, etc. Additionally, the tower’s platforms are made out of perforated panels so that the forest trees and vines can grow unobstructed through the slats over time. Due to the natural, remote location, all of the building materials, which are minimal apart from the steel frames themselves, will be delivered by hand and assembled on site in order to reduce impact on the existing landscape. + Daniel Tiong Photography by Steven Ngu Ngie Woon, Daniel Tiong

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Steel-framed treehouse slated for Malaysian national park

Let’s talk about Renewable Energy Certificates … for natural gas

July 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Ready for RECs for RNG?

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Let’s talk about Renewable Energy Certificates … for natural gas

How Allbirds, Organic Valley and Everlane support regenerative agriculture

July 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

A small-but-mighty group of consumer goods is offsetting their carbon emissions by sourcing materials from farms and ranches investing in these best practices.

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How Allbirds, Organic Valley and Everlane support regenerative agriculture

Tropical forest restoration is a global, high-value opportunity

July 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Forests have valuable ecological services and economic benefits, and this is where we should focus.

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Tropical forest restoration is a global, high-value opportunity

Stunning solar-powered home in Singapore melds with adjacent botanic gardens

July 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

When charged with creating a new family home just steps away from Singapore’s Botanic Gardens, the Singapore and U.K.-based firm Guz Architects was compelled to use the amazingly lush surroundings as inspiration for the design. Located on top of a hill overlooking the incredible gardens, the solar-powered Botanica House boasts an open layout heavily influenced by a soothing combination of Feng Shui and sustainability. Spanning more than 14,000 square feet, the Botanica House manages to blend into its idyllic setting through the use of local building techniques that include natural materials , as well as the use of clean energy via solar panels installed on the roof. Perched on top of a hill overlooking the botanical gardens, the home is comprised of three levels with large cantilevers that give the structure the appearance of “floating” over the hilltop. Related: Solar-powered prefab home in Texas features a whimsical pop art water catchment system The home’s entryway is marked by a landscaped pond and waterfall that lead up to the front door. Following a sunken courtyard , the interior space features several connections to the outdoor areas. Although the natural setting and nearby gardens drove the design, the beautiful home was also based on various principles of Feng Shui , such as the round lift and angling of the front door. Water also plays a strong role with a soothing river-like pool that wraps around the exterior and winds its way through the interior. The home has a strong connection to the natural setting thanks to floor-to-ceiling windows and sliding doors that lead out to the outdoor spaces. Throughout the home, natural light is also diffused through various skylights. + Guz Architects Via ArchDaily Photography by Patrick Bingham-Hall via Guz Architects

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Stunning solar-powered home in Singapore melds with adjacent botanic gardens

Hype and hope for hydrogen

July 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Hydrogen is inching toward commercial viability and scalability, with new technologies that could support global decarbonization.

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Hype and hope for hydrogen

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