Fair share: How a sharing economy can chop down on food waste

November 17, 2018 by  
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Fair share: How a sharing economy can chop down on food waste

May Mobility CEO Alisyn Malek on first- and last-mile solutions

November 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Autonomous, electric and shared vehicles — also known as the three revolutions — are supposed to be the future. And May Mobility, CEO of Alisyn Malek, is embracing it, having created a self-driving and electric shuttle service that focuses specifically on first and last mile solutions.Focusing on working with existing transportation and community transit, these new vehicles are hoping to work in tandem. “We start with one project in a specific neighborhood to get the community comfortable with the technology, and then look for more opportunities to expand,” she said.

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May Mobility CEO Alisyn Malek on first- and last-mile solutions

The circular economy of the water cycle

November 16, 2018 by  
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A new collaboration seeks to combine circular principles with water management best practices.

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The circular economy of the water cycle

Sustainable finance ideals thrive in Asia

November 16, 2018 by  
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From Malaysia to Australia, more investors are funding renewable energy, sustainable supply chains and other efforts to future-proof economies against climate change.

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Sustainable finance ideals thrive in Asia

In the business of wasting nothing

November 16, 2018 by  
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Matthew Hollis, founder and CEO of waste management software firm Elytus, talks about the cultural side of trash.

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In the business of wasting nothing

The Nogal House saves energy with smart site-specific design

November 15, 2018 by  
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Mexican architecture practice BGP Arquitectura recently completed the Nogal House, a contemporary dwelling in San Pedro Garza García, Mexico that’s shaped by its environment in more ways than one. Named Nogal after the existing type of walnut trees on site, the building features a curved and asymmetrical layout informed by the locations of the trees and site preservation goals. The residence also adopts passive solar principles to minimize its energy footprint and uses insulated double glazing throughout. Spanning an area of 670 square meters over three floors, the Nogal House stretches east to west on a triangular site. Nature plays a central role in the design of the home, with its curvaceous, organic forms and natural materials palette . The boundary between indoor-outdoor living is blurred through full-height glazing and use of steel, rattan and wood-based furnishings, designed by the architects to match the colors and textures in the gardens. Multiple timber patios built around the walnut trees extend the living space to the outdoors. “The entrance to the house is through the middle level, where living, dining room and kitchen are located besides a home theater that, by opening and closing doors, could be an independent extra room for the house,” explained the architects of the layout. “A double-height space connects this level with the upper library, studio and pool area with a grill. In the ground level, in touch with the patios, are the bedrooms and the family room, in a more intimate atmosphere.” Related: Zigzagging green terraces make up a luxury residential block in Mexico City In addition to strengthening the dwelling’s connection with the outdoors, the operable walls of glass also flood the interiors with natural light to minimize dependence on artificial lighting while allowing for natural ventilation. Windows were minimized on the south facade to further reduce HVAC requirements. The home is also partly buried into the ground to take advantage of thermal mass ventilation and equipped with low-maintenance landscaping, low-flow fixtures and low-energy appliances. + BGP Arquitectura Photography by The Raws via BGP Arquitectura

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The Nogal House saves energy with smart site-specific design

Spain launches plan for 100% renewable electricity by 2050

November 15, 2018 by  
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Spain’s social democratic government has launched an ambitious plan to change the country’s electricity system by 2050. In an effort to completely decarbonize its economy, Spain will be transferring its entire electricity system to renewable sources over the next 30 years with a goal of slashing greenhouse gas emissions by 90 percent compared to 1990 levels. This plan is part of Spain’s draft climate change and energy transition law, and the government is committing to installing a minimum of 3,000 megawatts of wind and solar power capacity each year for the next 10 years. The European nation is banning new licenses for fossil fuel drills, hydrocarbon exploitation and fracking wells. It is also committing one-fifth of the state budget to measures that will curb climate change. Christiana Figueres, former executive secretary of the UN’s framework convention on climate change (UNFCCC), said the draft law is “an excellent example of the Paris agreement . It sets a long-term goal, provides incentives on scaling up emissions technologies and cares about a good transition for the workforce.” According to The Guardian , there will be “just transition” contracts drawn up that will shut down most Spanish coal mines in return for early retirement packages, training for clean energy jobs and environmental restoration. The government will partly finance these deals via auction returns from the sale of emissions rights. The Spanish government has also scrapped a controversial “sun tax” that stopped the country’s booming renewable energy sector. The new law will also mandate a 35 percent electricity share for green energy by 2030. SolarPower Europe chief executive James Watson said that this law should be “a wake-up call to the rest of the world.” Within 11 years, energy efficiency will improve by 35 percent, and government and public sector authorities will be leasing buildings that nearly reach zero-energy. Spain has its sights on going carbon neutral, and it is leading the charge in the battle against climate change . Via The Guardian Image via Ian Mackenzie

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Spain launches plan for 100% renewable electricity by 2050

Is your Thanksgiving turkey putting your family’s health at risk?

November 15, 2018 by  
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With Thanksgiving right around the corner, many of us are planning meals centered around a turkey. But a new report from the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and its partners at the Food Animal Concerns Trust says that you could be putting your family’s health at risk by eating turkey because of the way American meats are produced. Just last week, NBC News reported an outbreak of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella that is linked to raw turkey , and it is still spreading. So far, the outbreak has made 164 people sick, and one person has died. According to experts, at least 2 million Americans suffer infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria each year — resulting in more than 23,000 deaths — and those numbers are rising. Related: 6 vegan and vegetarian turkey alternatives for Thanksgiving If you are wondering what that has to do with your holiday planning, the NRDC analysis says that turkeys are given antibiotics more intensively than other livestock in the United States. The U.S. livestock industry raises animals with an intensive use of antibiotics, with most of the medicines being fed to groups of animals that aren’t sick to compensate for stressful and unsanitary living conditions. However, this is not necessary. Several European countries stopped this practice years ago, and last month the European Parliament voted to ban such practices. Using antibiotics this way is driving a crisis in antibiotic resistance, and the World Health Organization warns that if we want antibiotics to remain useful for treating people when they are sick, we have to use antibiotics more responsibly. So if you are buying a turkey this Thanksgiving, look for labels like “Animal Welfare Approved” or “USDA Certified Organic.” These certifications mean that the turkeys were raised without antibiotics or growth promoters. Also, be sure to properly handle and cook your turkey. It is in your best interest to choose a turkey that has not been fed antibiotics. In the future, maybe the turkey industry (as well as the American beef and pork industries) will figure out a way to protect the consumers who buy their products. Via NRDC and EWG Image via Shutterstock

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Is your Thanksgiving turkey putting your family’s health at risk?

State cap-and-trade systems make case for carbon pricing

November 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Consider this real-world proof.

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State cap-and-trade systems make case for carbon pricing

State cap-and-trade systems make case for carbon pricing

November 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Consider this real-world proof.

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State cap-and-trade systems make case for carbon pricing

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