Germany’s environmental ministry nixes meat, fish at official functions

February 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The German equivalent of the Environmental Protection Agency is saying yes to sauerkraut, no to bratwurst—officially, at least. Barbara Hendricks, minister for the environment, announced last week that the Umweltbundesamt , Germany’s federal environmental arm, will serve neither meat nor fish at state events. She cited as a reason the inordinate environmental burden they pose on the environment, especially in the case of livestock farming, which studies show generate more greenhouse-gas emissions than transportation. This isn’t a novel stance for the ministry. In 2009, the Umweltbundesamt counseled Germans to return to the prewar tradition of eating meat only on special occasions, if not for their health, then for the sake of the planet. “We must rethink our high meat consumption,” said then–environment minister Andreas Troge. “I recommend people return to the Sunday roast and to an orientation of their eating habits around those of Mediterranean countries.” A nation that offers hundreds of varieties of sausage may not be so easily swayed, however. Germans consume a lot of meat—about 60 kilograms (132 pounds) per capita per year, according to some estimates . Unsurprisingly, Henrick’s pronouncement has already drawn criticism, with one political rival accusing the minister of “nanny-statism” and forcing vegetarianism on people. “I’m not having this Veggie Day through the back door,” said Christian Schmidt, minister of food and agriculture. “I believe in diversity and freedom of choice, not nanny-statism and ideology. Instead of paternalism and ideology. Meat and fish are also part of a balanced diet.” A member of Bavaria’s conservative Christian Social Union party, Schmidt previously called for a ban on giving meat substitutes names like “vegetarian schnitzel” and “vegetarian sausage” because they are “completely misleading and unsettle consumers.” Infographic: The true environmental cost of eating meat He also censured German schools for eliminating pork from the menu out of consideration for Muslim students. “We should not restrict the choice for the majority of society for reasons of ease or cost,” he said. Meanwhile, Hendricks’s detractors have dismissed her a hypocrite, since meat and fish will still be offered in the staff cafeteria. “The ban only applies to a handful of guests, not to 1,200 employees,” said Gitta Conneman, a senior minister from the Christian Democratic Union. “This is pure ideology, a ‘people’s education’ for the diet.” But, at least for now, the environment ministry isn’t budging. “We’re not telling anyone what they should eat,” it said in a statement. “But we want to set a good example for climate protection, because vegetarian food is more climate-friendly than meat and fish.” Via ThinkProgress Photos by Marco Verch and Oliver Hallmann

Here is the original:
Germany’s environmental ministry nixes meat, fish at official functions

Duke University researchers use light to convert carbon dioxide to fuel

February 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

What if the carbon dioxide building up in our atmosphere could be put to good use as fuel ? For years chemists have chased a catalyst that could aid the reaction converting carbon dioxide to methane , a building block for many fuels – and now Duke University scientists have found just such a catalyst in tiny rhodium nanoparticles . Duke University researchers converted carbon dioxide into methane with the help of rhodium nanoparticles, which harness ultraviolet light’s energy to catalyze carbon dioxide’s conversion into methane. Rhodium is one of Earth’s rarest elements, but according to Duke University it plays a key role in our daily lives by speeding up reactions in industrial processes like making detergent or drugs. Rhodium also helps break down toxic pollutants in our cars’ catalytic converters. Related: Scientists create a new kind of matter called time crystals The fact that the scientists employed light to power the reaction is important. When graduate student Xiao Zhang tried heating up the nanoparticles to 300 degrees Celsius, the reaction did produce methane but also produced an equal amount of poisonous carbon monoxide . But when he instead used a high-powered ultraviolet LED lamp, the reaction yielded almost entirely methane. Jie Liu, chemistry professor and paper co-author, said in a statement, “The fact that you can use light to influence a specific reaction pathway is very exciting. This discovery will really advance the understanding of catalysis.” The scientists now hope to find a way to employ natural sunlight in the reaction, which Duke University says would be “a potential boon to alternative energy .” The journal Nature Communications published the research of seven scientists from Duke University’s chemistry and physics departments online this week. Via Duke University Images via Chad Scales/Duke University and Xiao Zhang/Duke University

Read the original:
Duke University researchers use light to convert carbon dioxide to fuel

Episode 65: Kashi grows ‘transitional’ wheat; circularity takes off in cities

February 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

In this week’s episode: How Phoenix is kicking its reputation as “the world’s least sustainable city,” and thinking big and small when it comes to corporate projects in cities.

See original here:
Episode 65: Kashi grows ‘transitional’ wheat; circularity takes off in cities

You can’t have lasting sustainability without social inclusion

February 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The common refrain in these 5 segments: If a solution isn’t accessible for everyone, it isn’t viable over the long term.

Read the original:
You can’t have lasting sustainability without social inclusion

Why supply chain managers opt for sustainably produced material

February 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

According to a new EcoVadis survey, companies that hopped early onto the sustainability bandwagon say it’s paying off financially.

Read the rest here:
Why supply chain managers opt for sustainably produced material

How California farmers are using floods to feed soil

February 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The Oroville dam crisis inspired farmers to capture floodwater underground for use in warmer months.

Read the rest here:
How California farmers are using floods to feed soil

On Harmony and Hope

February 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The universal adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals by all the world’s nations marked a huge global milestone, something that many thousands of people had been working to achieve, over many years. This momentous breakthrough sparked AtKisson President and CEO Alan AtKisson to pen a song and spark a global movement, imbuing music, dance and simple human happiness into sustainable development and create our best hope for a bright future.

Original post:
On Harmony and Hope

Sustainability Meets Mainstream Financial Markets

February 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

What does it mean when the world’s largest financial data, analytics and benchmarks provider, S&P Global, acquires sustainability experts, Trucost? The implications for companies and sustainability professionals are vast. S&P Global Head of Innovation Dmitri Sedov and Trucost CEO Richard Mattison explore how financial markets are responding to the transition to a low carbon economy and the strategic importance for corporations.

See the rest here:
Sustainability Meets Mainstream Financial Markets

Indonesian president gives forest management back to indigenous communities

February 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

After decades of conflict over the power to oversee Indonesia’s forests, President Joko Widodo gave management rights back to nine indigenous communities. According to the World Agroforestry Centre, millions of indigenous people cared for forests sustainably for centuries until the Dutch colonial government declared state ownership, and this moment marks an important milestone in the acknowledgement of indigenous rights . For years, indigenous communities have fought for recognition as their rights have been contested by the government – even after independence in 1945, according to the World Agroforestry Centre. There are thousands of distinct ethnic groups across the islands of Indonesia, and Widodo recently took what the center described as a highly symbolic step in formally granting forest management titles to the nine indigenous communities. In a speech on the occasion, Widodo said, “Recognition also means an appreciation of Indonesia’s original values and its identity as a nation.” Related: Indonesian president announces plan to halt palm oil industry expansion Widodo cited the Kajang people, one of the nine communities, in his speech as an example from which others could benefit. An earlier national government altered the Kajang’s forests’ management status from indigenous to “production forests with limited uses” so the government could control them and parcel some land out for rubber plantations. But the Kajang developed “a set of local regulations that affirm, recognize, and protect based on traditional management,” according to Andi Adriardi, a member of a non-governmental organization that helped the Kajang regain rights. They coordinated with the local government and organizations to reclaim the title. Adriardi said the government recognized their case as a “good lesson that approaches perfection” for a well-managed forest. Kajang leader Andi Buyung Saputra, pictured above with Widodo, said in his acceptance speech, “Our traditional wisdom has played an important role in managing and preserving our forests. This has contributed to keeping our Earth greener and reducing the negative impacts of climate change .” Via World Agroforestry Centre Images via World Agroforestry Centre and Wikimedia Commons

Go here to see the original: 
Indonesian president gives forest management back to indigenous communities

How One Plant in India Learned to Turn Carbon into Baking Soda

February 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech, Green

As far as environmentalists are concerned, carbon dioxide and baking soda sit at entirely opposite ends of the eco spectrum. One is a greenhouse gas we have far too much of, an unfortunate by-product of our modern lifestyle; the other is a beloved…

Originally posted here:
How One Plant in India Learned to Turn Carbon into Baking Soda

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1472 access attempts in the last 7 days.