This mesmerizing lamp reacts to earthquakes across the globe in real time

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

This minimalist lamp responds in real time to earthquakes around the world. French artist Fabien Bouchard , who works under the name Parse/Error , linked the lamp to the data from IRIS ( Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology ) to which it reacts by emitting light pulses and rumble-like sounds when an earthquake occurs. The clean, simple design makes the Earthquake Lamp a beautiful object for any home, but its purpose makes it more than a beautiful light source . The artist, who lived through the great 2011 T?hoku earthquake in Japan , drew inspiration from this devastating event and created an object that would offer a tangible connection to the Earth and the power of nature. Related: 14 brilliant new lighting designs that will inspire you Its shape– a flattened planisphere that represents the axis of the longitudes– gives off light and sound pulses that change according to the location, magnitude and duration of earthquake across the globe. Linked to a sub-woofer, the Earthquake Lamp produces an impressive rumble that will stop you in your tracks and induce a sense of both fascination and anxiety. + ParseError

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This mesmerizing lamp reacts to earthquakes across the globe in real time

Nissan to start selling rooftop solar panels and batteries

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Tesla’s model of selling electric cars and solar panels seems to appeal to other automakers too – now Nissan is getting in on the game with Nissan Energy Solar . The company recently launched the service to sell rooftop panels along with their battery storage product xStorage Home . Their press release says United Kingdom residents equipped with solar products could save as much as 66 percent on their power bills. Nissan describes Nissan Energy Solar as an all-in-one solution. They’re offering three different panel options: the competitively priced Value option, the most efficient Efficiency option, or the Design option, which boasts panels integrated on rooftops. Combine that with the xStorage Home battery storage product, and Nissan hopes it will be easier for UK residents to enjoy the benefits of renewable energy – although with Nissan Energy Solar homeowners can opt to buy just solar power , just storage, or both. Users can charge up a Nissan Leaf or e-NV200 with the system. Related: Nissan’s xStorage battery for the home rivals Tesla’s Powerwall Nissan makes the case for why a buyer should choose their products over another company’s on the Nissan Energy Solar website: “We have partnered with some of the world’s largest and most advanced energy companies to provide our customers with a fully integrated product range, seamless service, and genuine value. Our products are some of the most sustainable on the market, giving a second life to batteries from our electric vehicles and maximizing our use of recyclable materials .” The company will perform LiDAR remote analysis of rooftops to optimize solar panels, according to Motoring Research . A six-panel system costs £3,881, which is around $5,383, including installation. Full Solar and Storage systems start at £7,635, around $10,589. The company’s products are designed, per Motoring Research, to be more affordable than Tesla’s. The Nissan New Energy website says the systems will be on sale soon. + Nissan Energy Solar + Nissan UK Via Motoring Research Images via Nissan

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Nissan to start selling rooftop solar panels and batteries

8 Ways to Go Green While Getting Fit

January 19, 2018 by  
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Committing to a healthy lifestyle is No. 1 on the … The post 8 Ways to Go Green While Getting Fit appeared first on Earth911.com.

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8 Ways to Go Green While Getting Fit

Copper-clad Copenhagen landmark boasts Denmarks most energy-efficient laboratories

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Copenhagen’s recently completed Maersk Tower boasts the nation’s most energy-efficient laboratories, where waste energy is captured and reused. Designed by C.F. Møller Architects , this new city landmark is a pioneer within energy-efficient laboratory construction and boasts a variety of sustainable design elements from an innovative facade with movable climate shields to multiple green roofs. The copper-clad building was created as an extension of Panum, the University of Copenhagen’s Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. Seven years in the making, the 42,700-square-meter Maersk Tower sports a triangular and organic form clad in glass and copper-covered shutters that reference the city’s many copper church steeples. The vertical massing also leaves space for a new publicly accessible campus park with a zigzagging ‘floating path’ providing pedestrian and cyclist access to different parts of campus. Laboratories make up over half of the building, which also houses offices, shared facilities, an 18,000-square-meter foyer, canteen, auditoriums, and classrooms. “To create architecture for world-class health research, it is important to design a venue with many opportunities to meet—both across different professional groups and across the public domain and the research community,” wrote the architects. “This will help to disseminate the research activities, leading to knowledge sharing and inspiration for new and groundbreaking research.” To that end, all the shared facilities are grouped together in the low base on which Maersk Tower sits. An open atrium with a continuous spiral staircase joins 15 floors and promotes views of the outdoors and visual connectivity indoors. Every floor features an open “Science Plaza” that serves as natural gathering spaces. Related: Solar-powered school will teach children how to grow and cook their own food Natural light and ventilation are optimized throughout the building and views of greenery can be enjoyed from every floor. Copper shutters that adjust as needed provide protection from solar heat gain. Lush green roofs that top the tower and the low base help combat the urban heat island effect . + C.F. Møller Architects Images by Adam Moerk

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Copper-clad Copenhagen landmark boasts Denmarks most energy-efficient laboratories

Episode 108: State of Green Business 18; Blackrock hypes purpose

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

In this week’s episode, why Larry Fink champions social purpose, the state of the green profession and business goes loggerheads with sea turtles.

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Episode 108: State of Green Business 18; Blackrock hypes purpose

With these Global Risks ahead, it’s time for a new social contract for business

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

New levels of inequality and a “depraved model of profit-making” reveal broken systems in crisis. But where there’s courage, there’s hope.

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With these Global Risks ahead, it’s time for a new social contract for business

Climate bonds surpass expectations, but where are U.S. corporations?

January 19, 2018 by  
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Experts warn that the market needs to keep accelerating.

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Climate bonds surpass expectations, but where are U.S. corporations?

Green Seal stamps a new CEO; a Whole Foods exec fights food waste

January 19, 2018 by  
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An energy industry veteran charges up EVs, Fidelity names its first sustainable investing lead and Freddie Mac leads on diversity.

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Green Seal stamps a new CEO; a Whole Foods exec fights food waste

Inside VF’s new sustainability direction

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The retail behemoth sets its sights on science-based targets and circularity.

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Inside VF’s new sustainability direction

A series of other thoughts about NAIAS 2018

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech, Green

Let’s start out with my in-the-moment string of notes during the Press Preview at this year’s NAIAS (Detroit Auto Show). This covers the main ideas about this year’s program at the time. I’ll add a few more comments and expanded thoughts at the end. Not sure if it’s an actual color trend, but there’s a lot of orange at this year’s #NAIAS #NAIAS2018 Attendance seems down and space more open at #NAIAS2018. Things just seem off this year. First thought it was decline of auto industry. There’s been gap-filling of various kinds over the last few years, suppliers and related fields, but not the vacant corridors this year. The concept of automotive ownership may be starting to decline, but it’s not to that level yet. More media info is being released directly from the companies’ media sites directly – cheaper and easier than preparing press kits. The political environment can’t help. I don’t have #NAIAS info, but my personal impression is that foreign journalist turnout seems low. Even the “rides” are empty. Maybe journalists are all jaded, and these will fill during the public show. But lotsa folks standing around. There’s a hominess to a number of the displays. Wood flooring, even on the turntables. And a giant cozy shadowbox wall display. Maybe fewer booth babes (of the stand next to the car on the turntable variety) at #NAIAS2018 Don’t know about public show in comparison. Pretty sure this display was also at #naias2017 so there’s some recycling going on, even if -green- is no longer part of the program. Again, I don’t have specific numbers, but there seem to be fewer cars per display. There’s a subduedness, even in all the flash &bombast Outrageous seems to be the antithesis of #NAIAS2018 There’s too much of it in the world already, and adding to it won’t go far. They get it. Not sure if #NAIAS is relevant to @ecogeek anymore. Transport is an important element in a greener world, but carmakers have moved on. It wasn’t the first thing that occurred to me, but gradually, I had the growing sense that this was not nearly as full of a show as previous years.  There are several things that could be causing that, and it’s likely some combination of all of those factors.  (And I could be completely wrong, the numbers might be different, but it’s my sense of what I observed this year.)  I’m fairly certain that foreign coverage was down from previous years.  The increased travel difficulties (getting a visa at all, let alone a working visa) mean fewer reporters.  A few years ago, I recall the big, welcoming banner in the giant media room with flags of many nationalities.  In 2011, I wrote elsewhere : “The polyglot nature of the show is reinforced both by the numbers of national flags hanging from the ceiling overhead as well as the languages one overhears walking through the room.”  There was none of that in 2018. The cost of travel could be another factor.  With the big automakers increasingly running their own media, the handouts and press kits are in decline.  Now, all a writer needs to do to get lots of press releases and images is go to the media website of the company (media.carcompany.com or some such) and download all the information they need.  No travel and dealing with Michigan winter required. Could it be that ownership of automobiles is beginning to decline, and with it a waning interest in cars in general?  I’m not sure that we are quite at that point yet, but there could be an overall fading of interest in cars, and a matching reduction in the amount of coverage that media outlets are willing to provide for it.  Even the local TV and radio stations, that have had a notable presence at recent years’ shows were less present this year. There were cars to be seen, of course, but very much a less compelling show, especially for an EcoGeek.  Sure, there are still electric vehicles as part of the mix, and some ongoing forward steps from a couple of the companies that seem to be doing some things toward being greener.  But, at the end of the day, not a strong show, and not one with much in the way of green news at all.

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A series of other thoughts about NAIAS 2018

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