UPS to buy huge amount of renewable natural gas to power its truck fleet

May 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

It’s the largest purchase order by any company in the U.S.

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UPS to buy huge amount of renewable natural gas to power its truck fleet

Turning methane into carbon dioxide could help us fight climate change

May 22, 2019 by  
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Methane is 84 times worse as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. What if we could chemically change methane into carbon dioxide?

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Turning methane into carbon dioxide could help us fight climate change

A tale of two companies: Tesla, Ford and the need for long-term plans

May 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

How can we tell now if Tesla, Ford or any company is ‘future-fit’ when they don’t publicly disclose their long-term plans?

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A tale of two companies: Tesla, Ford and the need for long-term plans

It’s a circular world: AI, robotics and chemical recycling are redefining a $110 billion industry

May 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Yes, the system is under pressure but municipalities like New York and Minneapolis have figured out ways to find value in their recycling streams.

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It’s a circular world: AI, robotics and chemical recycling are redefining a $110 billion industry

Cement giant Heidelberg pledges carbon neutral concrete by 2050

May 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

In a first for the sector, the world’s fourth largest maker said it would cut emissions in line with Paris climate goals.

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Cement giant Heidelberg pledges carbon neutral concrete by 2050

Artist installs nature-inspired tiny house made out of recycled glass and plastic in Times Square

May 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Brooklyn-based artist Fernando Mastrangelo has combined his passion for art and sustainability into one gorgeously green tiny home . The artist, who is known for using unique materials in his work, has just unveiled Tiny Home, a “recycled tiny house sculpture” made out of recycled plastic and glass. The 175-square foot home, which comes complete with a garden-filled courtyard, is currently open to the public in New York’s Times Square. According to Mastrangelo, the design for the 175-square-foot home was inspired by nature and climate change. Part of the ongoing NYCxDESIGN event, the tiny home is an interactive space that the artist hopes will demonstrate to visitors how eco-minded architecture is fundamental in creating a better world with less waste. Related: 8 tiny homes built tough for off-grid living The unique tiny home is made out of a variety of reclaimed materials. The ombre effect on the exterior, which gives off the illusion of a mountain range, was made out of recycled plastic . On the interior, reclaimed glass fragments were used on the walls and ceiling using the artist’s signature cement casting technique. Further into the space, a blue wall with large circular cutout leads to a soothing courtyard with a lush garden (designed by  Brook Landscape ) that wraps around the exterior, highlighting the strong connection between architecture and mother nature. Mastrangelo explains that as an artist, he feels the need to not only use eco-friendly materials to expand his own artwork, but as a way of embracing a new model of creation, “as spaces begin to be experienced more and more virtually, the boundaries of our imaginations — as architects and designers — are no longer limited to what we can physically build,” he explains “that’s where tiny house comes in; a space where the future of design can be experienced in real life.” The Tiny Home will be on display and open to the public at Time Square until May 22. + Fernando Mastrangelo Via Designboom Images via Fernando Mastrangelo Studio

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Artist installs nature-inspired tiny house made out of recycled glass and plastic in Times Square

Meet ‘Blade’, the world’s first 3D-printed hypercar

May 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

At first glance, any motorhead would be head over heels for Blade — a sleek sportscar with shimmery deep magenta facade. The aerodynamicity of the car is obvious from its low, curved volume. Yet, this isn’t just any supercar that has just hit the market. Created by San Francisco-based startup  Divergent Microfactories,  Blade’s chassis was entirely 3-D printed. 3D printing is already revolutionizing the manufacturing process around the world. Printing in 3D makes products such as furniture, jewelry, machinery and even cars, more lightweight, but without sacrificing durability. Not only does 3D printing offer a new, faster and more reliable way of manufacturing, but it is also more affordable and sustainable. Related: World’s first mass-producible 3D-printed electric car will cost under $10K Within the automotive industry, sustainability is an aspect that, according to Divergent founder and CEO, Kevin Czinger, can no longer be ignored. “We have got to rethink how we manufacture, because — when we go from 2 billion cars today to 6 billion cars in a couple of decades — if we don’t do that, we’re going to destroy the planet,” Czinger expains. The startup has been working on the Blade design for years. The car’s chassis is a 3D printed aluminum “node” joint, which is made up of carbon fiber tubes that plug into the nodes to form a strong and lightweight frame for the car, weighs just 1,400 pounds. According to the company, the 3D manufacturing process reduces the weight of the chassis by as much as 90 percent when compared to conventional vehicles. The Blade features a 700HP engine capable of running on both compressed natural gas (CNG) and gas. As for performance, its light weight enables the supercar to accelerate to 0-60 m.p.h in 2.2 seconds. But, in case you’re itchin’ to get the metal to the pedal in this sweet ride, you’ll have to wait. The company has only manufactured a few models, but hopes to start working with boutique manufacturers soon to start producing more. + Divergent 3D Images via Divergent 3D

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Meet ‘Blade’, the world’s first 3D-printed hypercar

New report reveals 70 million metric tons of plastic burned worldwide each year

May 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

A new report reveals the scale of the world’s plastic problem and the alarming amount of plastic that is burned. Despite the grave and well-documented consequences for human health, about 12 percent of all plastic in the U.S. is burned. In middle- and low-income countries without the infrastructure to recycle, plastic is burned at a much higher rate. According to the report , published by Tearfund, Fauna & Flora International, WasteAid and The Institute of Development Studies, a double-decker bus full of plastic is burned or dumped every single second. When calculated annually, that is equivalent to 70 million metric tons. Burning plastic releases toxic chemicals into the air that have been linked to heart disease, headache, nausea, rashes and damage to the kidney, liver and nervous system. In low- and middle-income countries without garbage facilities, the majority of trash is burned near homes — such as in the backyard — and poses direct threat to the inhabitants. In many cases, repeated exposure to the chemicals can lead to respiratory problems such as asthma and emphysema. Related: Microplastic rain — new study reveals microplastics are in the air In wealthier countries, new incinerator technology claims to burn trash with fewer direct health concerns. The negative health impacts of plastic are not new; in fact, this month the United Nations voted to list plastic as a hazardous waste material . Since the 1950s, 8.3 billion tons of plastic have been produced, and nearly half of that is only used once . This number is enormous but hard for many people to truly understand. According to National Geographic , this will be equivalent to the weight of 35,000 Empire State Buildings by 2050. But do these abstract numbers really help us put our problem into perspective? The first step is understanding the world’s addiction to plastic, but then specific actions must be taken. The American Chemistry Council, which contested the report’s results, argues that governments and companies need to enforce stricter requirements for packaging. Last year, major plastic producers formed the Alliance to End Plastic Waste , inclusive of Dow Chemical, ExxonMobil, Formosa Plastics Corp. and Procter & Gamble. The Alliance promised to invest $1.5 billion into the effort to reduce plastic’s impact on the environment. Via HuffPost Image via Stacie DePonte

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New report reveals 70 million metric tons of plastic burned worldwide each year

What’s the (right) word on climate change?

May 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The words we use most frequently to describe the climate problem may be the least impactful, according to new research. At least one big media company already is taking action.

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What’s the (right) word on climate change?

Sustainable Road Trip: a Green Getaway to Carmel, California

May 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Some people feel that 3D movies offer the ultimate adventure. … The post Sustainable Road Trip: a Green Getaway to Carmel, California appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Sustainable Road Trip: a Green Getaway to Carmel, California

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