A green remodel gave this 1950s home major treehouse vibes

September 13, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Your home might be cozy, but nothing compares to the fun of a childhood treehouse . Hazel Road Residence combines modern home design with treehouse vibes to showcase the best of both worlds. Completed by Oakland -based firm Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design, this project transformed a 1950s residence into a gorgeous family home with sustainable features. Located in Berkeley, California , this house began its life in 1952 as a 1,714-square-foot structure. Bringing the home’s “good bones” into the modern era took thoughtful planning. Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design started the transformation with a kitchen remodel in 2012. Warm wood cabinets echo the trees outdoors, while steel appliances keep the kitchen looking modern and fresh. This remodel also laid the groundwork for an upstairs addition, completed with the help of IDA Structural Engineers and Jetton Construction, Inc. The project was completed in 2018. Related: Residential building from the ’60s gets an energy-efficient remodel Now a 2,392-square-foot home, Hazel Road can comfortably house a family with kids. But more space isn’t the only welcoming element to the updated house. As stated in a project description, a “unifying concept to the project was to use the yard to greater effect.” This is where Hazel Road’s “tree-house feel” comes into play. The green yard features inviting wood and concrete stairs leading up to a deck shaded by a gorgeous Magnolia tree. Flush sliders added to the family room/kitchen blur the barrier between indoor and outdoor spaces . Continuing to bring the outdoors in, windows throughout the home frame views of the tree. This includes the upstairs master bedroom’s full-wall sliding windows with an ‘invisible’ glass safety rail. Sustainability features reinforce the home’s green perspective. For example, spray foam insulation and energy-efficient LED lighting were used throughout the structure. Exterior shades and deep overhangs control both glare and western light to minimize solar gain. The residence also includes a “state of the art rainscreen wall” with cementitious panel siding. + Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design Photography by Cesar Rubio, Matthew Millman and Buttrick Projects A+D

Read the original post: 
A green remodel gave this 1950s home major treehouse vibes

400-year-old baroque restaurant Three Roses receives a sensitive facelift

July 19, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 400-year-old baroque restaurant Three Roses receives a sensitive facelift

This monastery-turned- restaurant has given architectural planners 400 years of layers to reveal — and celebrate. The gradual unveiling is being handled by ADR architectural studio with a mission to respect the original architecture in the process. Known as the Broumov Monastery, the building originated in the era of baroque architecture. Rather than demolishing the masterpiece in favor of modernization, the design team is painstakingly refurbishing one section at a time. This is in conjunction with a variety of other projects the studio has tackled in the complex, including the Café Dietzenhofer, revitalization of the R?žový dv?r (The Rose Yard), a new visitor center and the U T?í r?ží (Three Roses) restaurant in the south wing. Related: Eco-friendly spiritual living at Holy Wisdom Monastery Over the centuries, the monastery has seen many uses and suffered a period of neglect and disrepair. The current investor asked the team to renovate the space while staying true to the original footprint, which didn’t exactly match modern needs. The resulting Three Roses Restaurant is a nod to the original pub that served food and drink in the location for the first few hundred years before the decay began, so history was on their side. Still, designers had to reverse inadequate previous attempts at improvements and overcome other obstacles. Working with preservationists, the studio worked meticulously to salvage items with historical relevance and replicate the authentic appeal of the baroque era. Separate yet connected vaults, a kitchen, an event room and indoor and outdoor dining areas are discovered through corridors accented by distinctive archways and terrazzo tile floors made from a local producer. Along the way, every surface that could be salvaged or resurfaced has remained inside the building, including old flooring that became a bar top and layers of paint that were left as-is to reveal the history of the space.  Inside the kitchen, the original tile stove, stone moldings and a number of tiny little windows and doors found in unexpected positions have benefitted from refurbishing, too. Original casement windows and paneled doors were preserved in the spirit of authenticity as well as inspiration for modern conversation. All salvageable, historically relevant items have been refurbished or replicated, and the restaurant is filled with rustic wood tables and wall paneling for a traditional pub vibe. + ADR Studio Photography by BoysPlayNice via ADR Studio

View post: 
400-year-old baroque restaurant Three Roses receives a sensitive facelift

"This House Never Ends" is a sustainable reno in Melbourne

July 7, 2021 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on "This House Never Ends" is a sustainable reno in Melbourne

“This House Never Ends” is a sustainable renovation project located in Melbourne, Australia and designed by Steffen Welsch Architects. The project created additional space in an existing building and added visual contrast with a unique combination of textures and colors. Building next to the existing home, a structure that was historic and Edwardian in nature, the designers let the neighborhood’s eclectic vibe inspire the renovation . The building was stretched over the entire length of the site, rotated 45 degrees and pulled apart to create a sequence of interconnected spaces. Related: Residential building from the ’60s gets an energy-efficient remodel As a result, moving throughout the house creates a marriage of old with new while revealing complex vistas through the rooms and outdoor spaces . “This is a house with a sense of discovery,” said lead architect Steffen Welsch. “It has no clearly identifiable building form but a series of almost equally sized rooms both inside as well as outside that each relate differently to each other. As a result, this home is experienced not as an object but a journey that doesn’t want to end.” Welsch chose to change the main entry point to a north-facing courtyard formed with three walls of three separate materials, including the weatherboard from the old house, recycled brick and a link clad in a timber screen. Specifically, the new house was actually designed for arrival via bicycle. The first floor patio is accessible from the lounge, and a private study provides views over the neighborhood. Upstairs, a private terrace extends views from the neighborhood to the rest of the city and nearby mountain range. The design applies passive solar principles, including solar control, thermal mass, insulation and cross ventilation. The efficient, double-glazed timber doors combined with thermal mass provided by the recycled brick adds to the insulation. Outside, a 4.75 kilowatt interactive photovoltaic system powers the house, while a heat pump and induction burner negate the need for gas. + Steffen Welsch Architects Via ArchDaily Photography via Shannon McGrath and Peter Clarke Steffen Welsch Architects

View original post here:
"This House Never Ends" is a sustainable reno in Melbourne

Berlins famed brutalist Bierpinsel tower hits the market for $3.8m

October 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Berlins famed brutalist Bierpinsel tower hits the market for $3.8m

You can now live in one of Berlin’s most iconic examples of brutalist architecture – for the price tag of $3.8 million. The famous Bierpinsel tower was originally built in 1972 as a restaurant, but it has sat vacant for years – and now it’s officially for sale . Soaring 150 feet over the cityscape, the tower has a whopping 12,765 square feet of space – and it could be repurposed into one very funky home or a sweet boutique hotel in the sky. Designed by architects Ralph Schüler and Ursulina Schüler-Witte, the tower holds court over Schlossstrasse – the second biggest shopping street in Berlin . It was originally a restaurant before converting into a nightclub and cafe, but it has been vacant since 2006. Related: 1970s Berlin Restaurant Transformed into Graffiti Art Tower In 2010 four street artists created vivid artwork on the Bierpinsel tower’s exterior , but it has failed to find any commercial use. Although the work has faded over the years, the art by Honest and Soyzone Gonzales is still visible. Sotheby’s Real Estate lists the tower as a “four-bedroom home”, but it could be put to many uses. Of course, potential tenants will have a large renovation on their hands. The interior of the tower has already been gutted, but it would take quite a bit of work to turn it into a home or hotel. + Sotheby’s Real Estate Via The Spaces Lead image by Jan M / Creative Commons

Read more from the original source: 
Berlins famed brutalist Bierpinsel tower hits the market for $3.8m

Melbourne architects upcycle 1960s warehouse into stunning energy-efficient home

October 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Melbourne architects upcycle 1960s warehouse into stunning energy-efficient home

Melbourne-based Zen Architects  converted a rundown 1960s warehouse into a gorgeous, energy-efficient home . The green-centric architects focused the ethos of the project on retaining and reusing as much of the warehouse’s original materials as possible while simultaneously creating an ultra-efficient, light-filled family home. The architects focused the project on using whatever they could from the almost 60-year-old space to create a contemporary home. The original frame and open layout of the 2,583-square-foot warehouse was kept as it was in order to start with an open slate. To begin the project, the design team carefully stripped various original features from the warehouse such as light fixtures, sprinkler pipes, doors, cladding, and roof sheeting – all to be repurposed into the new home, which has a 6.1 star energy rating. Related: Perkins + Will overhauls a boring concrete warehouse into beautiful LEED Gold offices The existing concrete floor of the warehouse was kept in tact for two reasons: to retain the industrial character of the building and for the energy-efficient benefits that come along with a concrete base. The living space was carefully crafted into the open layout to create a comfy living area down below with the bedrooms on a newly created “floating” mezzanine level installed in the roof’s volume between the existing trusses. Plywood pods were used to create spaces for the bedrooms and en suite bathrooms, which are reached by a wooden staircase. A continual sense of light and space was achieved by strategically placing windows and glazed panels that provide a seamless connection between the interior living space the outdoor areas. To add open-air space within the living area, the architects created a north-facing interior courtyard, which in addition to flooding the interior with natural light , provides natural heat to the interior during the wintertime. To waterproof the space, the architects laid a new ground level slab that drains rain water to a storm water pit. The slab is hidden under a timber deck made of recycled wood that runs through the interior and exterior spaces. + Zen Architects Via Dwell

Read the original post: 
Melbourne architects upcycle 1960s warehouse into stunning energy-efficient home

Italy seeks to phase out coal power plants by 2025

October 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Italy seeks to phase out coal power plants by 2025

Nation by nation, Europe is going green. The latest country to prove its commitment to sustainable solutions is Italy . On Tuesday, the Italian Industry Minister announced that by 2025, the country plans to phase out coal power plants. Additionally, the country plans to meet 27 percent of “gross overall energy consumption” with renewable sources by the year 2030. During a parliamentary hearing, Minister Carlo Calenda asked the national grid company to identify the infrastructure needed to make the transition. Shortly after, the country’s biggest utility, Enel, said it will not invest in new coal-fired power plants. Unlike other countries in Europe, Italy’s renewable sector is constantly growing. In 2015, for instance, renewable energy sources generated just under 38 percent of the country’s electricity. Hydro-electrical plants remain the biggest contributor (15.5 percent), and solar and wind sources have reached nearly 13 percent, according to ZME Science. The country has no nuclear plants, as they were banned through a referendum in 1987 . Related: Supervolcano in Italy is “becoming more dangerous” as magma builds beneath the surface Chris Littlecott, who heads a fossil fuel transition program at think tank E3G , applauded the development. “Italy’s positive commitment to phase out coal by 2025 demonstrates real international leadership as it completes its year holding the G7 Presidency,” he said in a statement. “Italy now joins its G7 peers in Canada, France, and the UK in taking action to phase out coal power generation over the next decade. Together, they can lead a growing coalition of countries and regions that are now acting on coal,” he said. Though this development is commendable, nothing has been confirmed just yet. The strategy should receive governmental and parliamentary approval at the beginning of November. If it passes, the measure will also speed up the introduction of vehicles powered by alternative fuels , and it will raise the number of EV charging stations to 19,000 by 2020. Via ZME Science Images via Public Domain Pictures, Pixabay

View original here:
Italy seeks to phase out coal power plants by 2025

Beech Architects convert 125-year-old windmill into a modern guesthouse

September 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Beech Architects convert 125-year-old windmill into a modern guesthouse

Beech Architects converted a 125-year-old windmill in Suffolk, England, into a modern guest house for rent. Complete with a metal-clad observation pod on top, the new guesthouse is well insulated and features custom-made furniture that fits its constraining circular layout. The 60-foot high windmill was built in 1891 and had a role in agricultural production at the time. However, the building had been disused for decades–until Beech Architects restored it. The owners, a surveyor and his wife who live in the house next door, plan to rent out the new guesthouse for extra income. Related: This windmill converted into a beach house is the perfect waterfront getaway “The biggest design challenge was the reinstatement of the cap or ‘pod’, which was not intended as a faithful historic reconstruction, but rather as contemporary and innovative interpretation that would also serve as the principal living and viewing platform ,” Beech Architects told Dezeen. Related: Rothschild Foundation Moves Into Beautifully Renovated Windmill Hill Dairy Farm The architects added insulation panels to the exterior walls and topped the entire structure with a wooden observation pod. The flexible timber rib system, manufactured by MetsaWood , is covered by 200 panels of zinc. This particular element of the conversion is why some locals complained that the structure doesn’t fit into its surroundings and looks “alien”. Nevertheless, the conversion project has recently received a RIBA award nomination. + Beech Architects Via Treehugger

Read the original post: 
Beech Architects convert 125-year-old windmill into a modern guesthouse

Wolves return to Rome’s periphery for the first time in 100 years

September 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Wolves return to Rome’s periphery for the first time in 100 years

The wolf , an animal that has served as a symbol of Rome since ancient times, has returned to the historic Italian city for the first time in a century. The alpha predators were recently sighted in a nature preserve at Castel di Guido, only a short distance from Leonardo DiVinci international airport and the perimeter highway encircling the capital of Italy. Scientists estimate that there are at least four wolves, two cubs and two adults, that reside in the area. According to Roman mythology, Romulus, Rome’s founder, and his brother Remus were suckled by a female wolf in a cave after being abandoned on the Tiber River. This episode is represented throughout Roman iconography, including the seal for Rome’s soccer club, AS Roma. The return of this iconic species to Rome is welcomed by the locals. “We’re very pleased that they are back,” said Alessia De Lorenzis, a professor whose work involves tracking and documenting the wolf pack. Related: American Coywolf is a fascinating hybrid species with supercharged adaptation Wolves were originally hunted in Europe and North America, nearly to extinction, in part due to their predation of livestock animals. The modern wolves of Rome seem to pose little threat to livestock as an analysis of their feces has demonstrated that they rely almost entirely on a diet of wild boar, a plentiful animal in the region. In Italy, the killing of wolves was promoted until the 1970s, a time when the Italian wolf population had fallen to about 100 animals. Wolves received protected status in 1971 and the population has since recovered to about 1,500-2,000 individuals, with a particularly robust population in the mountainous region on the border of France . Via The Telegraph Images via  the Italian League for Bird Protection

See the original post:
Wolves return to Rome’s periphery for the first time in 100 years

Former chicken coop transformed into a backyard artists studio in Berlin

September 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Former chicken coop transformed into a backyard artists studio in Berlin

We’ve heard of horse stables transformed into dwellings for people, but converted chicken coops are a first. Büros für Konstruktivismus turned an old henhouse into a timber-lined artist’s studio in the backyard of a Berlin villa. The adaptive reuse project, called Hühnerhaus (German for henhouse), preserves part of the original facade and completely overhauls the interior into a modern light-filled space. Constructed just after World War II in a lush garden, this former henhouse is a simple gabled structure with rustic roots. Architects Sandra Bartoli and Silvan Linden wanted to maintain the building’s slightly ruinous and overgrown appearance, while gutting and remaking the interior. Thus, the architects largely left the henhouse facade intact but transformed the interior into a single-room pine-lined space with an added mezzanine. The original chimney and steel beams were also covered in pine to create a near-seamless timber appearance. Related: Eight lucky hens live in this high-end chicken coop equipped with underfloor heating in New York Natural light pours in through large glazed surfaces. Stairs with in-built storage lead up to the mezzanine , where the attic for sheltering pigeons used to be. The door for pigeons was transformed into a triangle-shaped window that frames views of the trees and garden. + Büros für Konstruktivismus Via Dezeen Images via Büros für Konstruktivismus

Go here to read the rest: 
Former chicken coop transformed into a backyard artists studio in Berlin

Compact New Zealand home sets its sights on going off the grid

September 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Compact New Zealand home sets its sights on going off the grid

High on a hill above New Zealand’s idyllic Peka Peka beach sits an eco-friendly compact home that responds to the surrounding landscape. Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects designed the dwelling, named Peka Peka House I, as three boxy units perfectly positioned to maximize shelter as well as views of Kapiti Island, forestry, and farmland. In response to the client’s desires to eventually go off-grid, the home is equipped with photovoltaic panels, solar hot water panels, above-code insulation, and other energy-saving features. Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects separated the living, sleeping, and garage functions into three interconnected box-like volumes, each positioned in response to climate and views. Two of the boxes are clad in black-stained cedar ; one contains the living functions, while the other comprises bedrooms. The third box is clad in profiled polycarbonate and contains the garage and workshop. At night, the polycarbonate-clad volumes glows like a lantern. Timber decking surrounds the three volumes. Related: Dreamy cabin is a luxurious escape in the New Zealand bush The cedar-clad boxes are arranged to form a sheltered north-facing courtyard that provides views towards the sea and is protected from coastal winds. “As requested by our knowledgeable clients, the house promotes some eco values in the form of a combination of PV and solar hot water panels and above code insulation,” wrote the architects. “Their long-term ambition is to go off-grid. LED lighting throughout and exposed and insulated concrete slab as a heat store helps reduce power consumption. Natural ventilation picks up the consistent afternoon sea breezes.” + Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Jason Mann

Read the original:
Compact New Zealand home sets its sights on going off the grid

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8541 access attempts in the last 7 days.