Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

April 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

The innovative team at U.K.-based Inclume has come up with a unique way to take a break from the stresses of life. Its latest design is a reclaimed wood raft that accommodates two people. The Tetra raft even features a peaceful shading canopy made out of delicate, origami paper forms. Inspired by the shape of an abstracted sail, the volume of the raft incorporates multiple tetrahedron shapes. Entirely constructed out of reclaimed materials, Tetra achieves its buoyancy thanks to three old barrels that were donated to the team. Atop the barrels is the main platform, which is made of salvaged shipping pallets provided by a local carpenter. Several discarded garden bamboo canes comprise the frame and canopy. Even the boat’s oars, which were sanded and painted with a triangular motif, were donated from a local boat club. Related: Floating ICEBERG creatively confronts global warming With its tiny size and rustic nature, the reclaimed wood raft is perfect for an escape on the water. Adding a bit of serenity to the design is a beautiful, handcrafted canopy. This canopy consists of several triangular frames, which are crafted from thread entwined with recycled paper. The canopy is then covered in origami paper forms that add whimsy to the overall design. Intricately folded by hand, the paper forms sway gently in the wind and allow natural light and shade to dance across the raft. The Tetra raft was a temporary installation that took place on a local lake. During the day, passersby were encouraged to help the team construct parts of the raft on the shore. According to the designers, the aim of the event was not only to build a temporary, water-based shelter out of reclaimed materials, but to also encourage people to participate in similar projects in their communities. + Inclume Images via Inclume

See the original post here:
Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

First home solar pavement installed on a driveway

April 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Solar tiles aren’t just for roofs anymore. Platio, a Budapest, Hungary-based tech company, has just installed the first solar pavement for use on a residential driveway. “Roofs are not the only surfaces that can be used for solar energy production,” said Platio co-founder and engineer Imre Sziszák. “Paved areas absorb solar radiation all day long as well. The walkable solar panels of Platio can utilize this new source of clean energy.” Related: New recycled plastic sidewalk harvests energy from the sun The system consists of interlocking units called Platio solar pavers. Each paver is made from 400 recycled PET plastic bottles for a product more durable than concrete, according to the company’s product video . Pavement can be installed in sizes of 10 to 30 square meters and is suitable for driveways, terraces, balconies and patios. The energy generated by Platio tiles is fed back to the household’s power network. A 20-square-meter solar pavement can cover the yearly energy consumption of an average household, according to the video. The developers aimed for aesthetically pleasing tiles that would look good in a driveway and would increase a home’s energy efficiency. The solar pavers are available in black, red, blue and green. Hardened glass tiles protect the solar cells. They are anti-slip, so people can safely walk on them, and the tiles are designed to be able to bear the weight of a car occasionally driving over. Electric car drivers can also use the solar paving system to fuel their vehicles. Inhabitat previously reported on a 50-square-foot solar sidewalk Platio installed at an EV charging station in Budapest. Other uses include connecting a Platio solar paver system in an outdoor square to benches equipped with digital boxes, from which people can charge their mobile devices. Pavers could also fuel streetlights on nighttime walking paths. Unlike roof-mounted solar tile systems, paved areas with good sunlight access have a larger-scale potential for energy production. + Platio Images via Platio

More here:
First home solar pavement installed on a driveway

This modern art museum was once a cheese factory in Arkansas

March 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This modern art museum was once a cheese factory in Arkansas

In Bentonville, Arkansas, a giant factory that once processed cheese for Kraft Foods has been given new life as The Momentary, a modern art museum satellite to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Chicago-based Wheeler Kearns Architects led the adaptive reuse project, which has carefully preserved as much of the existing structure as possible while introducing contemporary additions. Like the building, the landscape also follows sustainable design principles and was created in collaboration with Tulsa-based Howell Vancuren Landscape Architects to purify and clean rainwater through a bioswale system. Officially opened on February 22, 2020, The Momentary was conceived as a cultural hub for contemporary international art with both indoor and outdoor areas. The oldest part of the original 63,000-square-foot decommissioned cheese factory was converted into The Galleries, an area spanning more than 24,000 square feet. The old fermentation room was converted into a 100-seat black box theater, called Fermentation Hall, while the former milk intake room has been renamed the RØDE House, which serves as a 350-seat multidisciplinary performance space that can be closed or partially open-air. The employee lunchroom has turned into a social space called The Breakroom. Related: A forgotten railway takes on new life as a new cultural destination in France New additions to the building have been differentiated with materials like steel and glass. An example of this can be seen in the museum’s 70-foot-tall vertical element, dubbed The Tower, which is the largest space in the program. It builds on multiple pre-existing intermediate mezzanines and is topped with a Tower Bar surrounded by panoramic views. Gallery space extends to the outdoors, including sculptures, courtyards like the Arvest Bank Courtyard and the 24,000-square-foot Momentary Green.  “The design centers on authenticity,” said Calli Verkamp, lead project architect at Wheeler Kearns Architects. “Embracing the history of the site, it maintains the industrial integrity of the building and preserves the connection between past and present that it represents for the community .” + Wheeler Kearns Architects Photography by Dero Sanford via The Momentary

The rest is here: 
This modern art museum was once a cheese factory in Arkansas

Rundown lodge near the Nile River is now a solar-powered eco-resort

February 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Rundown lodge near the Nile River is now a solar-powered eco-resort

Once known as one of Uganda’s most popular hotels, the Nile Safari Lodge had fallen into disrepair over the years. When it was tasked to breathe new life into the property, Kampala-based studio Localworks decided to pay homage to the building’s history by respectfully and carefully rebuilding the existing facilities instead of tearing them down and starting from scratch. Now, the fully refurbished accommodation is an incredible, solar-powered eco-retreat offering guests a direct connection to the nature surrounding the property. Located on the southern bank of the Nile River, the Nile River Lodge is enveloped in wilderness. Looking over the famed river, the lodge offers guests a chance to recharge their batteries while taking in the views. This calm atmosphere became the focal point of the green renovation process. Related: Two abandoned 1960s buildings in the middle of a desert become a chic eco-retreat Starting with the main building, the architects wanted to break open the communal spaces as much as possible. They did this by covering the existing building with a series of thick, grass-thatched roofs . The design strategy also aimed to implement new openings around the property to allow for indoor-outdoor living. The Ugandan climate is typically very hot and humid, so passive cooling strategies , such as natural light and ventilation, were used whenever possible. The wide, triangular openings and curved walkways found throughout the hotel allow guests to enjoy framed views of the river and surrounding Murchison Falls National Park from nearly anywhere onsite. At the heart of the eco-retreat is a soothing infinity pool that looks out over the river. A covered pavilion opens up to the pool and serves as the perfect spot to take in both the sunrise and the sunset. Guests will be able to enjoy down time in one of the eight cottages, all of which face the river. Although distinct in size and amenities, the cottages, referred to as bandas , are raised on stilts to reduce their impact on the landscape and generate air flow under the buildings. Made of natural materials such as wood, grass and stone, the buildings were all positioned to protect the interiors from the harsh equatorial sunlight. While passive strategies were used throughout the eco-resort, several modern features were also implemented to reduce the project’s environmental impact. Completely free of mechanical cooling systems, the lodge runs solely on solar power . + Localworks + Nile Safari Lodge Via ArchDaily Photography by Will Boase via Localworks

Read more:
Rundown lodge near the Nile River is now a solar-powered eco-resort

MVRDV to revive complex with BREEAM-certified groundscraper

February 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MVRDV to revive complex with BREEAM-certified groundscraper

MVRDV  has unveiled designs for a BREEAM Excellent-certified office building in Amsterdam as part of a redevelopment plan for the Tripolis office complex, a project created by celebrated Dutch architect Aldo van Eyck and long considered a commercial failure. In addition to the renovation of the old buildings and the addition of a park, the Tripolis Park project will feature a new 11-story “groundscraper” office block that will stretch along the site’s south boundary to unite the campus while protecting the complex from the noise of the adjacent A10 highway. Ever since its completion in 1994, the Tripolis complex has struggled to attract tenants despite its eye-catching wood-and-granite facades and colorful window frames. In 2019, the complex was granted Municipal Monument status and grouped with the nearby Amsterdam Orphanage, a 1960 masterwork also by Van Eyck, and has since attracted new attention. Tapped to make the complex commercially viable, MVRDV was invited to sensitively renovate the Van Eyck structures while injecting new life onto the grounds with a  mixed-use  program and new construction.  At the heart of the redevelopment project is the new 31,500-square-meter,  solar -powered office block that will sit along the southern boundary and feature an indented facade informed by the complex geometry of two of the existing Tripolis buildings. An interior public route will be created between the new and old structures and enclosed by glass walls, bridges, and stairs to join the buildings into a unified whole. In addition to updating the office spaces inside the old buildings, the architects will green the project with new roof gardens and a new park. The third Tripolis building, located on the north side of the site and physically separated from the others, will be transformed into affordable rental apartments.  Related: Tencent gets proposal from MVRDV for green smart city “The new building guards and shelters the existing Tripolis complex as it were, thanks to the protective layer we create,” Winy Maas, MVRDV Founding Partner, explained. “We literally echo Tripolis, as if it was imprinting its neighbour. The space between will be given a public dimension and will be accessible to passers-by. As a visionary in his time, Aldo already saw  office  spaces as meeting places. I want to continue that idea by promoting interaction between the two buildings in various ways.” + MVRDV Images by Proloog and MVRDV

Originally posted here: 
MVRDV to revive complex with BREEAM-certified groundscraper

Century-old building is reborn as a LEED Platinum home in San Francisco

February 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Century-old building is reborn as a LEED Platinum home in San Francisco

When architect Jonathan Feldman of Feldman Architecture began remodeling his home in San Francisco in the early 2010s, the growing green building movement in the city inspired him to turn his residence — dubbed ‘The Farm’ after its overgrown backyard — into a testing ground and laboratory for sustainable design. From installing renewable energy systems to sourcing sustainable materials, his pursuit of green, net-zero energy standards earned the project LEED Platinum certification. Purchased with the intent of green renovation, the 1905 historic home that Feldman and his wife, Lisa Lougee, renovated was rebuilt from the inside out to merge the building’s classic Edwardian features with more contemporary elements. Critical to the project’s success was the addition of new windows and skylights as well as an open-floor plan to undo the home’s closed-off character. The basement was also transformed to include a usable backyard and deck. Related: Green-roofed San Francisco townhouse features an indoor swing In pursuit of LEED Platinum certification, Feldman worked with the San Francisco building department to allow an unprecedented type of water system in the city: a water recycling system that includes both rainwater and gray water harvesting with tanks tucked below the rear deck. A heat recovery ventilation system pumps fresh air into the home with minimal energy loss, while solar thermal panels partially heat the mechanical system. All materials are sustainably sourced and non-toxic. Water and electricity monitoring can be accessed via panels throughout the home or smartphone technology. “The key to achieving LEED Platinum or any kind of green standard is to identify and commit early on to the features of interest,” said Feldman, who strives to reach net-zero energy with many of his firm’s projects. “We didn’t push for the passive house standard because we didn’t believe it made sense for this particular project.” + Feldman Architecture Photography by Matthew Millman via Feldman Architecture

Here is the original: 
Century-old building is reborn as a LEED Platinum home in San Francisco

Portugal-based nonprofit refurbishes old buildings with natural insulation

February 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Portugal-based nonprofit refurbishes old buildings with natural insulation

With a background in social initiatives, nonprofit Critical Concrete aims to refurbish socially relevant spaces that are shared by low-income communities in Portugal. In addition to refurbishing homes for those in need, Critical Concrete is also focused on educating the local community on sustainable actions and earth-friendly practices by running several different educational programs and activities. The organization promotes green architecture and social action through a summer school program that refurbishes a home for a family in need every year. In August, 32 students from 20 countries were brought together for three intense weeks, with a plan to establish a model to refurbish housing through sustainable methods. With the help of 15 experienced mentors and support from the team at Critical Concrete, the group worked on a home in the Bairro dos Pescadores (Fishermen’s Neighborhood) of Matosinhos in northern Porto. The old quarter was originally built for fishermen and their families around the turn of the 20th century. Related: Derelict property transformed into a vibrant, sunny hostel in Portugal To ensure that the theories behind the actions were being absorbed as well, students spent Tuesdays and Thursdays attending lectures by the program mentors, who were experts in architecture , new ways of building and urban perspective. Critical Concrete has made these lectures available on its Youtube channel , so anyone can learn more about these topics. Along with cooperation from the Municipality of Matosinhos, Critical Concrete also worked alongside public organization MatosinhosHabit, who contributed the cost of materials. The original building was constructed in the 1930s and is a representation of typical homes found around the Bairro dos Pescadores neighborhood, as in it is built without insulation . Previously, the nonprofit had used materials such as mycelium and wool to create an insulation solution for these types of structures, but in 2019, Critical Concrete started working with a new mixture of cardboard and lime. While this blend proved to be the most durable solution, it was also quite arduous. First, the cardboard is wetted and shredded, then mixed with sand, hydraulic and hydrated lime and plaster. Finally, the mix is applied to the formwork molds of the structure and dried. Though the transformation of even one house per year is impressive enough, Critical Concrete hopes to convert even more homes through additional projects in the future and have a more positive influence on similar communities throughout Portugal . + Critical Concrete Images via Critical Concrete

See the original post here:
Portugal-based nonprofit refurbishes old buildings with natural insulation

Egyptian pavilion proposal for 2020 Venice Biennale targets climate change

February 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Egyptian pavilion proposal for 2020 Venice Biennale targets climate change

According to the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency, climate change and poaching are putting approximately 70 animal species in the country at risk of extinction. In a bid to highlight Egypt’s biodiversity crisis and environmental threats, international design collective Cosmos Architecture submitted a climate change-focused design proposal to the Egyptian Ministry of Culture’s design competition for the Egyptian pavilion at the 2020 Venice Biennale. The project was selected as a runner-up in late December 2019. Cosmos Architecture’s Egyptian pavilion proposal comprises a small entry area in the front, an open-plan main exhibition space, a screening area and storage space. The minimalist pavilion explores two main topics: the negative aspects of the Anthropocene, the proposed geological epoch defined by human influence, such as climate change and deforestation; and case studies of current technologies and solutions that aim to “balance ecological diversity in Egypt … and create a new symbiotic urban environment.” Related: Immersive, dystopian exhibit shows what life could be like post-climate change The architects have dubbed the case study projects and proposed environmentally friendly solutions “watermarks” and propose projecting some of these example projects inside steel mesh installations that hang from the ceiling to educate pavilion visitors. The case studies cover a range of topics, from conservation of natural habitats to the sensitive adaptive reuse of post-industrial sites. “The case studies that were examined to represent the good watermarks in Egypt were done so with the intention of researching how different places are reacting and responding to the effects of Anthropocenic climate-related phenomena (i.e. loss of habitat , scarcity of farmable land from overgrazing, species extinction and industrial scars),” explained the project team, which comprises Mohamed Hassan El-Gendy, Sameh Zayed, Pietro Paolo Speziale, Juan Martinez, David Sastre and Nader Moro. “What the selected case studies will tell us is that designing for climate change comes in many different forms.” + Cosmos Architecture Images via Cosmos Architecture

More here:
Egyptian pavilion proposal for 2020 Venice Biennale targets climate change

Transformed midcentury modern home focuses on sustainability

January 31, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Transformed midcentury modern home focuses on sustainability

Originally designed in 1956, this mid-century property in Indianapolis has been remodeled to reflect the new owner’s modern style. The design plan included methods to turn the 60-year-old house with outdated fixtures and overgrown landscaping into an organized, harmonious, private living space. By prioritizing the preservation of the original architecture as much as possible while maintaining privacy for the occupants, the designers were able to create a “Midcentury Modern” home with sustainability features. The sustainability features that characterize the MCM 220 Modern Home include reclaimed structural elements in the wooden structure and fireplace, double-glazed low-E floor-to-ceiling windows and an unvented insulated roof system. Outside, a membrane roof combined with a deep roof channels stormwater to the screened porch for a “sensory experience” during rainfall. Additionally, a moss garden around the bedrooms creates a zen-like ambiance. New skylights and floor-to-ceiling high-efficiency windows were added to increase the flow of natural passive light inside the living areas, replacing the original small south-facing windows and outdated skylights. To create even more light, the outdoor landscape was completely overhauled, trees were pruned and brush was cleared to allow the windows to be more exposed. This also helped create an indoor-outdoor connection and make the home feel more spaciously associated with nature. A mudroom inside includes room for coats, laundry, crafting and space for the family dog. Custom walnut cabinetry can be found inside both the gallery and kitchen, with original brick stonework used to finish the fireplace and refurbished cantilevered hearth. A series of smaller, supplementary sustainability steps were implemented, such as high-efficiency plumbing fixtures, HVAC systems, LED light fixtures and light-colored roofing. Natural wood (oak, walnut and cedar) was used in aspects of the interior and exterior, including the dining room table. The inside is also decorated with reconditioned and reupholstered furniture and the interior is finished with a mix of slate and oak plank flooring built on the structure’s original concrete slab. + HAUS Via Dwell Images via HAUS

Original post: 
Transformed midcentury modern home focuses on sustainability

Restored Georgian townhouse has rainwater-fed green roof

January 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Restored Georgian townhouse has rainwater-fed green roof

The Sun Rain Room is an extension and restoration of a two-story Grade-II listed townhouse designed and constructed by Tonkin Liu. Partnering with local craftspeople to complete the project, the London-based architecture firm was able to create an extension of the existing structure through a landscape that feeds off of the sun and rain . The house, which was built as a home and studio for the owner, features a green roof , garden room and reflecting pool that are all designed to uniquely celebrate nature. The garden room on the ground floor is encased in a wall of curved glass that works as both a living space for occupants and as a meeting area for the owner’s professional studio. The covered outdoor area connected to the garden room contains a studio workshop, kitchen, potting shed, recycling bay and a store. Another wall of sliding mirrors conceals the planter for a collection of small trees that grow through the green roof overhead. The neighboring open patio covers a basement refurbished with a new bedroom, two bathrooms and a utility area. The courtyard garden’s perimeter walls support a roof made of plywood cut to allow the most possible light into the site. Between the patio (which frames the terrace) and the house sits an etched glass staircase to bridge the two spaces. The true meaning of “Sun Rain Room” comes to play with the 110-millimeter structural shell roof that is perforated with coffered skylights made to mimic raindrops that land onto the pool . This creates an ethereal, organic environment inside the home. To make the townhouse more sustainable, heat loss from the ground floor is decreased through double-glazed, double-laminated glass with low-e coatings. Waterproof concrete was used in the construction of the basement, which removed the need for a backup waterproofing system. What’s more, the light-well from the plywood roof around the courtyard has improved the affecting passive ventilation strategy for the home. The green roof not only contributes to sustainable drainage, but is also planted with local trees and plants that suit the natural habitat to improve the site’s biodiversity . The reflecting pool is filled naturally with harvested rainwater, also used to irrigate the green roof. + Tonkin Liu Images via Alex Peacock, Greg Storrar, Tonkin Liu, and Alexander James Photography

More here:
Restored Georgian townhouse has rainwater-fed green roof

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1552 access attempts in the last 7 days.