This lightweight, soda can-sized air purifier destroys mold, VOCs and odors

May 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This lightweight, soda can-sized air purifier destroys mold, VOCs and odors

Did you know that indoor air pollution can be as bad as or worse than outdoor air pollution? From off-gassing chemicals in paints to mold and dust, the contaminated air inside our homes and offices negatively impacts our health and can lead to fatigue and dizziness, or even respiratory diseases in the long-term. Fortunately, air purification technology has improved in recent years to offer easy and affordable ways to combat indoor air pollutants. Read on to see our review of one such product, the Luft Qi , an on-the-go and filter-free air purifier billed as the smallest of its kind in the world. About Luft Qi Developed by Taiwanese company Titus & Wayne, the Luft Qi air purifier is described as the “first compact air purifier using nanotechnology.” The air purifier uses a method called photocatalytic oxidation (PCO), a technology originally invented by NASA to prevent food spoilage — for instance, by removing bacteria in meat or pesticides from fruits and vegetables — and has since been applied to air purification. Here’s how it works: broad-spectrum ultraviolet light — Luft Qi uses UV-A LEDs  — is combined with a tungsten oxide modified titanium oxide (TiO2) filter to create highly reactive oxidizers that break down harmful molecular-sized and microbial pollutants. Luft Qi isn’t the first to use PCO technology for air purification; followers of Ellen DeGeneres might remember her shout-out to the Airocide PCO air purifiers on her show in 2013. Advantages of Luft Qi Unlike Airocide, however, Luft Qi is much smaller and more compact. Made of aluminum , the soda can-shaped device only weighs 160 grams and its modern design, available in six different colors, means it probably won’t clash with your existing setup. Moreover, since Luft Qi only uses PCO, the device is conveniently filter-free, meaning that you’ll never need to buy or replace the filter. When plugged in, Luft Qi will gently draw air in through its perforated base, where pollutants are then broken down through photocatalytic oxidation. The purified air is then pushed through the top, with carbon dioxide and water molecules as byproducts. PCO technology has also proven effective at removing ultra fine particulates, airborne mold spores and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as formaldehyde and exhaust fumes. Luft Qi is designed for on-the-go convenience and comes with a standard 3.3-foot-long USB-C to USB-A cable that can plug into a laptop or any USB port adapter outlet. The startup says that the device can be safely used 24 hours a day and attribute its minimal electricity demands of 2.5W to an energy-efficient design. The air purifier uses a hidden brushless fan — the same as those used for computer servers — with a measurable noise level of around 25 decibels, which isn’t very quiet, but isn’t loud enough to be distracting either; it is quieter than most air purifiers. Luft Qi is estimated to last at least 4.5 years without replacement. Disadvantages of Luft Qi Despite Luft Qi’s many benefits, there are several downsides to the product. Firstly, since Luft Qi only uses PCO technology instead of filters, the device cannot remove larger particulates like traditional devices with HEPA filters can. This means Luft Qi will not eliminate pollen, dust, dust mites or pet dander, which are among the major contributors to poor indoor air quality and allergies. Due to its small size, Luft Qi also requires a long time to achieve desirable results and is best used in contained rooms such as bedrooms or car interiors. And while Luft Qi does eliminate odors, it also does so at a fairly slow rate; carbon filters are a better choice for odor removal. Moreover, PCO technology produces carbon dioxide as a byproduct. While the amount produced is likely small, those who want to keep Luft Qi turned on 24 hours a day will need to introduce adequate ventilation. Speaking of constant use, Luft Qi’s PCO technology also has its drawbacks for those hoping to sleep with it plugged in at night. While the constant fan noise can be dismissed as white noise, the device’s bright blue light can be distracting in an otherwise dark room. Putting Luft Qi on the ground isn’t a good option either; the air purifier should be elevated above the floor since it relies on the surrounding environment’s air circulation to work optimally. Should You Buy Luft Qi? Overall, Luft Qi isn’t the best air purifier given its small size and the limitations of PCO technology. If you really want to get rid of indoor air pollution, it’s best to use PCO technology in conjunction with air purifiers with filters. Luft Qi’s relatively steep price may also put buyers off. However, if you’re mainly interested in removing VOCs, microbial pollutants, odors and mold spores in small, contained environments, Luft Qi is a good choice. This particularly holds true in small offices or rooms in tropical and humid environments where mold is an ever-present concern, like Taiwan, where the Luft Qi startup is based. Furthermore, the product is nicely designed, well-constructed and doesn’t become hot to the touch. Titus & Wayne launched Luft Qi on Indiegogo in a successful crowdfunding campaign that’s since raised more than $215,000. From now until mid-June, Luft Qi is available for $99 , not including shipping, in an early-bird special with an estimated delivery in July 2018. The product’s regular retail price is $169. + Luft Qi Images via Luft Qi

Read the original here:
This lightweight, soda can-sized air purifier destroys mold, VOCs and odors

Product Review: Inhabitat tests out the Honeywell Lyric WiFi Thermostat

August 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Product Review: Inhabitat tests out the Honeywell Lyric WiFi Thermostat

Honeywell’s Lyric Wifi Thermostat is a smartphone-connected device that allows you to regulate the temperature of your home while you’re there or on-the-go. Because you can control it via the Lyric app , it gives you the flexibility to start cooling your place down as you leave the office on a hot day, or to shut the system down from 30,000 feet in the air if you forget to switch it off before leaving to catch your plane. Like other programmable thermostats, it can be set up on a schedule so that it maintains a comfortable temperature during the times you’re usually at home while switching the system off during times you’re not. There’s also a handy geofencing feature that allows you to map off a radius around your home so that the system can detect that you’re nearby using your phone’s GPS system and start heating or cooling your home to your preferred temperature. A thermostat that knows when you’re almost home? That’s pretty cool! RELATED: VIDEO: How to save money and energy with a programmable thermostat Design-wise, the Honeywell Lyric WiFi Thermostat is one of the most visually pleasing models on the market, although you have to admit that its round form factor does look pretty similar to the Nest’s (a competitor that rings in at about $50 more at $249). On the other hand, it should be noted that Honeywell came up with the first round thermostat way back in 1953, so maybe they’re just getting back to their roots. With a pristine white face wrapped in a sliver of silver, the unit is almost like an artpiece or accessory for your wall. The minimal touchscreen buttons light up in a cool blue, giving it an even more soothing appearance. In the box: The unit itself, a battery, two screws and anchors for mounting, instructions and an optional wall plate. Setting the device up was a breeze, although I should note that since I live in an apartment with no existing in-unit thermostat system, I was unable to actually install the thermostat as you would if you were actually going to use it to control your heater and air conditioner. Instead, I simulated the installation process using a wall adapter, so this part of my review is based solely on the ease of setup, rather than how the device actually regulated the temperature in my home. The first steps are downloading the Lyric app and connecting to your WiFi, and after that, your phone guides you through the entire setup and installation process. Although I wasn’t fiddling with any wiring or anything like that, I was still able to appreciate the step-by-step instructions that popped up right on my phone to guide me through the installation process if I was. It even asks you questions along the way so that you can tailor the experience to your particular system, taking the hassle out of fumbling with an instruction manual and leafing through the parts that may or may not apply to you. The whole thing took me about 5 minutes to complete (though you would probably need to spend at least 20 if you were actually following the steps). One thing I did find was that the touchscreen buttons were not quite as responsive as I wanted them to be and I had to press down harder than I’m used to doing on my smartphone. Luckily, there’s not much need to use the buttons on the unit itself after setup since you can just use your phone to make any changes, or simply rotate the face of the unit clockwise or counterclockwise to turn your temps up or down. The Lyric app itself is intuitive, easy-to-use and starts up in a matter of moments. The Lyric WiFi Thermostat is also fully compatible with Apple HomeKit, Samsung SmartThings, Amazon Echo and other home ecosystems. In terms of energy and cost savings, Honeywell’s energy savings calculator estimates that I stand to save about $142 per year on my energy bill (based on my zip code) using the Lyric WiFi Thermostat. That means that in addition to keeping my home comfortable and reducing my power usage, I could also make back the $199 spent on the Lyric Thermostat in a little over a year. To learn more about how the Lyric Wifi Thermostat can help you slash your energy bills, check out the video above or visit Honeywell’s Lyric Connected Home website here . + Honeywell Lyric WiFi Thermostat Editor’s note: The Honeywell Lyric WiFi Thermostat was supplied to this writer free-of-charge by Honeywell in exchange for an unbiased review. Photos: Honeywell and Yuka Yoneda

Here is the original:
Product Review: Inhabitat tests out the Honeywell Lyric WiFi Thermostat

Product Review: The Nubagg Lets You Smartly Reuse Your Plastic Bags As a Garbage Can

November 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Product Review: The Nubagg Lets You Smartly Reuse Your Plastic Bags As a Garbage Can

Garbage cans belong to that group of mundane household items that have been around for so long that it seems there really isn’t much that can be done to improve on their design. Or so we thought. Industrial designer Arnold Castro recently introduced us to the Nubagg , and at first glance, we could hardly tell that it was a trash receptacle at all. With no walls or sides, Castro’s design basically consists of what he calls a “freakishly lightweight” metal frame that is used as a support for the plastic bags you bring home from the supermarket. We were very interested in the Nubagg ‘s extremely minimalist design and the way it encourages reuse, so we decided to take it for a test drive to see how well it would stand up to our trash. Read on for our full review. The beauty of the Nubagg is that it allows you to save money by substituting plastic bags you get at the store for garbage bags. But since we already do that (using regular trash cans), we weren’t quite sure what the added benefits might be. Upon checking it out more carefully, we realized that its design, which features two protruding bars for you to sling your bag handles over, solves one of our biggest pet peeves – when the sides of our bags cave in and we have to reach into the muck to readjust them. We also noticed that we had to take the garbage out less with the Nubagg because it can be filled up to the full capacity of each bag and is not restricted by walls. If you’ve ever picked up a full-looking trash bag to go throw it out and realized that there was still a lot of room in the bag itself, you’ll see why it’s better to use each bag to its full capacity. The one precaution we did have about the Nubagg was that it probably should not be used with just one bag unless you’re only trashing dry goods. Double or triple bagging is a better idea, especially in the kitchen, but the upside to this is that the Nubagg can do double duty as a plastic bag storage unit. Just keep all of your bags on there and when the top few are full, throw them (and the trash) away to reveal clean bags underneath. In addition to being a vehicle for the reuse and recycling of bags, the Nubagg is, itself, recycled. The body is made of 100% recycled metal and weighs about 1 lb., cutting down on the fuel needed to ship it. The box it’s shipped in is also recycled. If you’re interested in getting your hands on your own modern Nubagg , they recently launched an Indiegogo campaign where your contribution of $20 will not only help you get this product off the ground, but also score you a Nubagg Classic (or a Nubagg mini for $15) just in time for the holidays. + Nubagg + Preorder your Nubagg here

View original here: 
Product Review: The Nubagg Lets You Smartly Reuse Your Plastic Bags As a Garbage Can

PRODUCT REVIEW: We Try Out Water-Saving Vege Aqua Fruit and Vegetable Wash

February 10, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on PRODUCT REVIEW: We Try Out Water-Saving Vege Aqua Fruit and Vegetable Wash

If you’ve been trying to incorporate more fruits and veggies into your diet but find washing them to be a chore, Vege Aqua is a new product that might make it feel like less cumbersome. Unlike other produce washes that contain a long list of ingredients like oleic acid, glycerol, ethyl alcohol or potassium hydrate, Vege Aqua is 99.7% water and 0.3% anion (negatively charged ions). In addition to making it easier to eat fresh fruits and vegetables, we were also interested in how Vege Aqua requires much less water to be used to get your food clean. We recently tried out this handy spray for ourselves – read on to see what we thought. Read the rest of PRODUCT REVIEW: We Try Out Water-Saving Vege Aqua Fruit and Vegetable Wash Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bacteria on fruits , clean vegetables , e.coli , fruit and veggie wash , fruit rinse , fruit wash , inhabitat review , produce wash , vege aqua , vegetable wash , wash produce

See the rest here:
PRODUCT REVIEW: We Try Out Water-Saving Vege Aqua Fruit and Vegetable Wash

Bad Behavior has blocked 892 access attempts in the last 7 days.