Chemical-free community swimming pool is filled with recycled rainwater filtered through plants

January 9, 2017 by  
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This isn’t your run-of-the-mill neighborhood swimming pool. Instead of harsh chemicals and bland concrete, this elegant pool, designed by Philippe Barriere Collective is filled with naturally-filtered , recycled water and built out of local rocks, gravel and stone. To keep the partially-open space warm in the cooler months, recycled steam from the hamman in the complex is distributed throughout the space, giving the lucky residents who get to use it an organic experience closer to romping around in a natural spring than slogging through another boring session of laps in an antiseptic gym. The aquatic complex, called Lilu for the Berber term for rainwater, comprises a health club, cafe (organic, of course), a hamman and the pool. The complex has flexible hours to encourage neighborhood residents to socialize and relax after a healthy session in the fitness spaces. Just don’t call it “going to the gym” – this is a much more natural and all encompassing experience. Related: The UK’s first natural public swimming pool will use plants, not chemicals, to stay clean The water is filtered into the pool by allowing rainwater to run down an olive orchard hill, through the complex pavilions, through filtering and finally purified by running through plants (water lily, water hyacinth, phragmites australis, caltha palustris, menthe aquatic for purification and hippuris vulgaris, waterweed for oxygenation). There is no chlorine required to keep things clean. This eco-system, filled with biodiversity, ensures a low-maintenance, self-sustaining system that can be enjoyed by the whole community. The vaults enclosing the pool are made out of local materials . These vaults cover the top space, but the sides are left semi-open and the main level partially submerged below ground. This allows the space to be filled with natural light and air. To keep the space warm in the cooler months, steam from the hamman is recycled and redistributed through the complex. + Philippe Barriere Collective Via V2com

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Chemical-free community swimming pool is filled with recycled rainwater filtered through plants

Why did this Olympic diving pool suddenly turn bright green?

August 10, 2016 by  
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After concerns over the water quality near Rio de Janeiro beaches before the Rio 2016 Olympic Games , now a supposedly clean Olympic pool has inexplicably turned green. At the Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre, startling pictures showed a blue pool and a green pool next to one another. Officials allowed Olympians to continue diving in the green pool as they seek the cause of the weird color change. The change occurred overnight. One day the pool was blue and the next day it was green. Olympic officials tested the water quality and said there were “no risks for the athletes” in a tweet . They also said they’d be “investigating the cause.” Related: Experts to Rio Olympic athletes: Don’t put your head underwater While some speculated urine produced the color, Jim’s Pool Care national manager Brett Blair told The Guardian the Olympic pool was too large to have turned green from urine. Blair speculated poor filtration could be a cause. He told The Guardian, “…the main reason a pool normally goes green is lack of sanitation…The scary part is how at a world event, a pool could go green. It’s unbelievable.” Another leading theory is that algae caused the change , because the water is so cloudy. Some Olympic divers said they couldn’t see their partners when they dove into the green water. Algae blooms can also happen when chlorine levels in a pool change, and if that’s the case at the Rio pool, it might mean some worker wasn’t doing their job. Chlorine can probably solve the pool problem; Blair said the issue could be resolved in 24 to 48 hours. While the AP reported Rio spokesperson Mario Andrada saying that algae proliferated “because of heat and a lack of wind,” we’re still waiting for the official word from the Olympic committee on why the issue happened. Via The Guardian and Gizmodo Images via Tom Daley on Twitter and screenshot

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Why did this Olympic diving pool suddenly turn bright green?

BLESS turned a hand-knotted rug into a cozy hammock for the workplace

August 10, 2016 by  
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Get ready to kiss another day of slouching in front of your computer screen good-bye. The designers behind the BLESS N° 56 WORKER’S DELIGHT installation at the Vitra Design Museum in Germany are looking to provide ergonomic solutions that improve workers’ health and well-being while getting them to step away from the screen. But they aren’t just creating another standing desk or balance ball chair. Instead, they’ve created an ingenious hammock  made out of a hand-knotted rug. Photo by Ludger Paffrath Design label Reuber Henning turned a hand-knotted rug into a cozy hammock for the BLESS N° 56 WORKER’S DELIGHT installation, demonstrating the versatility of everyday objects. The rug label teamed up with two BLESS designers and redefined their product as a suspended, moving piece of furniture in line with the concept of an experimental workspace . Four-meter fringes were used as ropes to suspend the carpet, transforming it into a large relaxing piece of furniture. Photo by Ludger Paffrath Related: Vitra’s new museum will house a permanent exhibition of iconic furniture designs The new installation BLESS N° 56 WORKER’S DELIGHT combines different materials, everyday objects , patterns and purposes to redefine the modern workspace, turning the Vitra Design Museum Gallery into a playful environment filled with experimental ergonomic and quirky design prototypes of new types of office furniture. The exhibition will be on show from 10 June until 9 October 2016. + Reuber Henning + BLESS Lead photo by Bettina Matthiessen © Vitra Design Museum

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BLESS turned a hand-knotted rug into a cozy hammock for the workplace

Fletcher Studio Unveils Terraced Garden With Biopool in Zurich, Switzerland

October 31, 2013 by  
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Situated in Zurich, Switzerland, this serene garden and biopool by Fletcher Studio is suspended on the edge of a steep hillside. By placing the garden on the hillside, the architects opened up views of the surrounding environment and made them an integral part of the garden. The existing hillside flora and additional plantings form a backdrop that encloses the garden, screening it from an adjacent street and enabling the area to function separately from the house. The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Read the rest of Fletcher Studio Unveils Terraced Garden With Biopool in Zurich, Switzerland Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , biopool , Botanical , eco pool , Fletcher Studio , garden , Green Building , green design , green pool , sustainable design , Switzerland , Zurich        

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Fletcher Studio Unveils Terraced Garden With Biopool in Zurich, Switzerland

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