These colorful hexagonal wall tiles are made from sound-absorbing "wood wool"

April 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on These colorful hexagonal wall tiles are made from sound-absorbing "wood wool"

These colorful hexagonal wall tiles by Form Us With Love strike a brilliant balance between sustainable materials, economy and functionality. The modular tiles are available in a variety of different colors and can be assembled in various patterns to create a gorgeous mural on your wall. The tiles are made from wood fibers mixed with cement and water, and they have sound-absorbing properties that can actually improve the acoustics of a room. Form Us With Love collaborates with different manufacturing companies to create everyday objects, furniture, and lighting products that challenge conventional design initiatives. For the production of these hexagons, they work with the only manufacturer of wood wool in Sweden – a 20-man traditional family business called Traullit . The tiles are made from wood slivers which are known primarily as excelsior or wood wool in North America. The material is mainly used for packaging, cushioning, insulation, and even stuffing teddy bears. The process of making wood wool cement is very simple: wood slivers are cut from local tree logs and then get mixed with some water and cement, which acts as a binder and provides strength. The mixture is then put into a mold and left to dry into shape. The result is a material that is environmentally friendly, moisture and sound absorbent, and fire and water resistant. + Form Us With Love

Original post: 
These colorful hexagonal wall tiles are made from sound-absorbing "wood wool"

This hexagonal indoor farm grows more food in less space with 90% less water

March 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This hexagonal indoor farm grows more food in less space with 90% less water

Hexagro ‘s Living Farming Tree is a groundbreaking indoor garden that uses technology to grow food faster using less space. The innovative design combines aeroponics with efficient grow lights, full automation, and a modular tiered structure to optimize space, crop yield, and water use – allowing anyone to grow crops in practically any room. Hexagro aims to bring nature indoors and nurture the urban farming movement. This goal led them to create Living Farming Tree, an automated vertical growing system controllable with an app. As seen in the video above, poles and hexagonal connectors pop together to create the tree, providing a structure to support small growing modules. The system, which can be customized and scaled up with more modules, is built entirely with recyclable materials . Related: Build your own indoor garden with modular LEGO-like blocks Living Farming Tree uses aeroponics , a process that enables urban growers to cultivate produce sans soil or pesticides and with around 90 to 98 percent less water. The plants flourish in an inert substrate with roots hanging underneath; well-aerated, their roots absorb nutrients via a nutrient mist and oxygen, causing the plants to grow faster and taste better. According to Hexagro, this system—which boasts low energy consumption—allows for a 150 percent increase in the plants’ nutritional value as well. The tree also lets you sit back and relax, for the most part: LED lights, sensors, and a proprietary monitoring computer keep your maintenance time to a minimum. Leafy greens, sprouts, herbs, air-filtering plants, or small fruits like strawberries will be available for budding urban farmers, and Hexagro hopes to offer spices, edible and non-edible flowers, and even vegetables like eggplants or tomatoes in the future. Sold yet? Their website does not yet say how much the Living Farming Tree will cost, but Hexagro’s first international crowdfunding campaign is in the works, and you can let the sales team know you’re interested via this Google Documents form . In the words of CEO Felipe Hernandez, “With your help, [Hexagro] will transform your house into an indoor farm . Anybody, anywhere, can access healthy food .” + Hexagro Urban Farming Images courtesy of Hexagro Urban Farming

View original post here:
This hexagonal indoor farm grows more food in less space with 90% less water

Green walls are great, but they need to work efficiently

March 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Green walls are great, but they need to work efficiently

You may have heard about green walls or even seen a few. Also called living walls , live walls, eco-walls and vertical gardens , these structures are essentially walls covered in vertically grown plants, and they can appear either inside or outside. The idea has been around for a while, and it’s really caught on lately due to their environmental and health benefits, as well as appealing aesthetics. But not all green walls are made equal. Read on to learn how a green wall should be designed in order to be useful and friendly to the environment. How Do They Work? There are several types of green walls. Some might consider regular walls covered in ivy as a green wall, while others would limit the definition to walls specifically designed to hold vegetation. The latter type can be constructed in various ways . They might consist of panels with pre-planted vegetation, or replaceable trays that fit into slots in the wall, enabling easy removal if necessary. Vertical gardens also vary in terms of how they function. The simpler models require hand watering, while others have self-watering pipe systems. Many green walls rely on hydroponic systems that use drip irrigation. Based on the desired aesthetics and effects, you might choose different types of plants. You can include many varieties of plants, including groundcover, ferns, shrubs, flowers and more. Benefits Green walls have become popular in urban areas where people want to make their space greener but don’t have a lot of room to do so. Vertical gardens ensure the benefits of green space without taking up too much space. They also improve air quality, which is advantageous for people as well as animals and the overall environment. Plants remove carbon dioxide from the air and produce oxygen. They also filter out various contaminants, creating cleaner air, and can remove up 87 percent of airborne toxins inside a home within just 24 hours. This helps people breathe easier, especially indoors where air quality is notoriously bad. Ecowalls can reduce the urban heat-island effect and improve thermal insulation, reducing a building’s energy costs. They can also absorb noise and provide mental health benefits. Research has shown that having plants around can reduce stress and increase productivity by up to 15 percent. Challenges Critics have identified several potential issues with green walls. If the designer doesn’t adequately plan for their project, they say, the costs might outweigh the benefits. Maintaining a green wall requires more work and resources than a regular wall, especially if it doesn’t have a self-watering system. You’ll have to manually water the plants, and even with a self-watering system, the plants will need care at some point. Green walls typically require large amounts of water, which can be unsustainable if supplies are low and the wall isn’t equipped with water recycling equipment. Operating a living wall also requires energy. Producing this energy can have a negative impact on the environment if derived from fossil fuels. How to Make a Green Wall More Efficient A green wall’s efficacy depends on how it’s constructed, operated and maintained. Drip irrigation systems appear in walls that use panels and hydroponic systems, while walls with replaceable trays use tank systems. Drip irrigation tubing is typically about 85 percent more efficient than tank systems. They connect to the building’s plumbing system, while tray systems require manual watering. Drip irrigation systems can also automatically recycle water. You could use recycled water in a tank system from an air conditioning system or another source, but you’d have to do so manually. Because tray systems require more water and use soil, they can attract bugs and form mold, fungus and even introduce pathogens. Due to this possibility, they don’t comply with strict health, safety and hygiene codes in places such as healthcare facilities. These buildings would need to use a hydroponic system. For these reasons, the soil in tray systems must be replaced about every month, which can be costly. Panel systems don’t require this and therefore don’t need as much maintenance. Another factor that can impact a green wall’s efficiency is the type of vegetation with which it is populated. Drought-resistant and local plants need less water than other types of vegetation, so they’re more water-efficient. Plants also, of course, require sunlight. Placing a living wall in an area with a lot of natural light will reduce the amount of artificial light needed and, therefore, the amount of energy it requires. The Importance of Truly Green Green Walls For a green wall to be truly beneficial, you need to use an efficient watering system, put it in the proper place (with ample natural light), and plant vegetation that’s easy to maintain and requires minimal irrigation. Anyone interested to install a green wall, as well as the architects and engineers in charge of designing them, ought to consider the efficiency of the system in addition to their benefits and aesthetics. Photos via Depositphotos , Scott Webb on Unsplash , Mike.dixon.design  via Wikimedia Commons , Kaldari via Wikimedia Commons , AlejandroOrmad via Wikimedia Commons , and Terry Robinson via Wikimedia Commons

View post:
Green walls are great, but they need to work efficiently

Tetra is a brilliant see-through dishwasher that fits in even the tiniest apartments

January 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tetra is a brilliant see-through dishwasher that fits in even the tiniest apartments

Most people living in tiny apartments are resigned to the fact that their kitchens will never have space for a dishwasher – but that’s no longer the case. Heatworks just unveiled Tetra – a new compact, tankless dishwasher that’s sure to make apartment dwellers jump for joy. According to the Heatworks team, if a two-person household were to switch from handwashing to the Tetra, they could save a whopping 1500 gallons of water every year. The Tetra, which will cost under $300, is the size of a small microwave, and it not only reduces water waste , but in fact, requires no plumbing connection at all. Since there are no faucet connections, water is loaded by hand. This simple design is a big asset, because it lets users know exactly how much water is being used. A typical Tetra load lasts just a few minutes and it uses about half a gallon of water. Detergent use is also reduced with small loads – the internal detergent reservoir will last dozens of cycles. Another cool feature is the machine’s transparency, which lets you keep track of the wash cycle. Related: Hand-powered Circo dishwasher saves time, space, money and water Standard dishwashers are designed to fit up to 13 place settings, which is great for large families. By contrast, the Tetra is designed for small households of two or three people who lack space for a full-size dishwasher and are looking to conserve water . Although compact, the Tetra can fit up to 2 place settings or 10 plates or 10 pint glass. Jerry Callahan, CEO and founder of Heatworks, revealed that the Tetra was inspired by the need to provide more efficient options to smaller households: “Our research indicates that although the average household is comprised of 2.58 people, the modern dishwasher holds place settings for 13 or more. This makes people believe that they either need to handwash their few dirty dishes — which wastes 10 times more water than using a dishwasher — or wait for a fill load to run a cycle. With Tetra, we hope to change people’s mindset.” + Heatworks Images via Heatworks

Originally posted here: 
Tetra is a brilliant see-through dishwasher that fits in even the tiniest apartments

Nanoleaf’s new dodecahedron Remote controls your smart home with a turn of the wrist

January 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Nanoleaf’s new dodecahedron Remote controls your smart home with a turn of the wrist

Nanoleaf is known for its brilliant lighting products – and now they’re launching an innovative dodecahedron-shaped remote that makes it easy to control any smart device in your house. The new Bluetooth -enabled Nanoleaf Remote just debuted at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) – and it promises to let you “fully customize your entire home with a quick turn of the wrist.” Nanoleaf ‘s new Remote allows users to easily control the company’s Light Panels and other HomeKit products. The device aims to take the frustration out of controlling multiple smart home products with numerous apps by simplifying tasks into the single controller. Users can program each one of the device’s 12 sides with commands to accomplish tasks like turning off lights, raising window blinds or your home’s temperature, or activating different pre-set scenes for events like parties or quiet nights in. Related: Nanoleaf’s new Rhythm module turns any Aurora array into a dazzling music visualizer Users rotate to the top the side they want to trigger, with the Remote glowing as it moves to offer feedback. On Nanoleaf’s website, prototype tester Pin-Yu from Singapore described the device as a “glowing ball of awesome from outer space.” Nanoleaf CEO Gimmy Chu said in a statement, “ Smart technology should cater to how people are using their products, making life easier and more enjoyable without being intrusive. The Nanoleaf Remote is designed to make the smart home smart again. We want to give people the option of controlling their smart home without always relying on their devices. Everyone is so glued to their phones these days, the Nanoleaf Remote offers the possibility to just sit back and enjoy living smarter.” The controller is incredibly light, weighing 0.13 kilograms, or around 0.28 pounds. The Remote is slated for release in February. + Nanoleaf Images courtesy of Nanoleaf

Here is the original post: 
Nanoleaf’s new dodecahedron Remote controls your smart home with a turn of the wrist

Belize votes to indefinitely end all oil exploration in its waters

January 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Belize votes to indefinitely end all oil exploration in its waters

The small Central American nation of Belize has decided to indefinitely end all new oil exploration in its waters. Belize only produces 3,000 barrels of oil a day, in contrast to the 1.5 million barrels that the United States produces each day in the Gulf of Mexico. However, this small but significant action sends a message to other developing countries trying to balance economic development with conservation. Like many developing economies, Belize’s depends on the export of its natural resources. Despite the economic importance of oil exports, the government decided that the preservation of its coral reefs and pristine waters were more important in the long run than petrodollars today. Home to a bit less than 400,000 people, Belize also hosts the longest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere. This and Belize’s other natural attractions, such as lush rain forests, attract tourists from around the world and generate $200 million annually, over 10 percent of the country’s GDP, in tourism revenue. Allowing oil exploration along the coast could seriously endanger the country’s tourism industry and ecological health. Environmental groups have been advocating for a ban on oil exploration since 2006, when Belize’s only oil company discovered new reserves. Related: Gorgeous Belize eco-resort will offer 100% carbon neutral villas The coral reef and its accompanying tourism supports the livelihoods of more than 190,000 people in Belize, so it is no surprise that the public is engaged in protecting the ecosystem . “Belize is a small country making a mighty commitment to putting the environment first,” said World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) reef scientist Nadia Bood, according to Quartz . Environmentalists hope that Belize will inspire similar action in other countries. “Ending oil activities will encourage other countries to follow suit and take the urgent action that is needed to protect our planet’s oceans ,” said WWF campaigner Chris Gee, according to Quartz . “Like the Belize Barrier Reef, nearly half of natural World Heritage sites worldwide are threatened by industrial pressures.” Via Quartz Images via Depositphotos (1)

Go here to see the original: 
Belize votes to indefinitely end all oil exploration in its waters

This ultra-chic Paris micro studio is part home, part transformer

December 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This ultra-chic Paris micro studio is part home, part transformer

The old adage “necessity is the mother of invention” is never more appropriate than when trying to design a beautiful home in an extremely tiny space . Paris-based Batiik Studio managed to create a spectacular home out of just 118 square feet by outfitting the entire space with transforming furniture. Batiik’s Marie Josephine apartment is the epitome of space-saving architecture and design. In the kitchen, most everything of use is hidden behind a minimalist façade. The fridge and oven are hidden behind a retro flexible wall, and the countertops and cabinet doors swivel open to reveal hidden storage. Seating is also covert – a cobalt blue table folds down flat when not in use. Related: Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet The compact studio certainly befits from Batiik’s minimalist design approach . Neutral colors keep the space light and airy, and beautiful archways add character to the apartment while delineating spaces. A loveseat couch doubles as a fold-out bed, and a small table pulls double duty as nightstand and coffee table. An invisible closet is hidden behind another arch. + Batiik Studio Via Apartment Therapy Photography via Batiik Studio

See more here: 
This ultra-chic Paris micro studio is part home, part transformer

Ore Streams: Studio Formafantasma creates striking furniture from salvaged e-waste

December 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Ore Streams: Studio Formafantasma creates striking furniture from salvaged e-waste

Millions of tons of e-waste clog up our landfills every year, but Studio Formafantasma is on a mission to breathe new life into the world’s discarded electronics. Designers Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin just unveiled “ Ore Streams ” – a new collection of geeky chic office furniture made from salvaged e-waste. According to the designers, “The collection of objects created for Ore Streams act as a trojan horse, using form and colour to initiate a deeper exploration of ‘above ground mining’ and the complex role design plays in transforming natural resources into desirable products.” Ore Streams is a collection of office furniture including a cabinet, desk, table, low chair, and a series of accessories such as a lamp, shelf and trash can. All of the products were made from e-waste – including dead-stock or recycled materials. Related: New biodegradable semiconductor could make e-waste a thing of the past While many designers who strive to mask repurposed products under a glossy new façade, Formafantasma’s furniture celebrates its techy origins. At first glance, the furniture may appear like any brand of austere, contemporary furniture, however the objects have retained much of their original features. The minimalist table incorporates an aerating grid from an old microwave, along with old mobile phone castings on the underside. The original body of the microwave can be found built into a shelf, while an entire keyboard has been inserted onto the side of the desk. + Studio Formafantasma Images via Studio Formafantasma

Read the original here:
Ore Streams: Studio Formafantasma creates striking furniture from salvaged e-waste

Luxurious eco-resort overlooks Sri Lankans most famous wildlife park

December 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Luxurious eco-resort overlooks Sri Lankans most famous wildlife park

Sri Lanka’s most celebrated wildlife park is famous for leopards, elephants, and sloth bears—and now Yala National Park is also known for a stunning, sustainably minded safari camp next door. Designed by Nomadic Resorts and Bo Reudler Studio , the Wild Coast Tented Lodge is an eco-resort with organic architecture set between golden beaches and the national park’s jungles. Located on the country’s southern tip, the “five-star” lodge welcomed its first guests in November 2017 and promises an unprecedented intimate experience of Yala with unique and luxurious offerings. Created for Resplendent Ceylon, the Wild Coast Tented Lodge comprises a collection of grid-shell bamboo buildings clad in reclaimed teak shingles and 28 cocoon five-star suites. The arched buildings, organized in six clusters, mimic the area’s giant rocks and boulders and are placed in a shape suggestive of a leopard’s paw print. High vaulted ceilings and large openings let in natural light, ventilation, and outdoor views. Natural and local materials were mainly used in construction and help seamlessly blend the organic architecture into the surrounding dryland forests. A rich palette of copper, brass, terrazzo , and textiles complement the materials. “The five-star lodge is designed to give visitors an intimate experience of Yala, celebrating the flora, fauna and culture of the area with minimal intrusion on the landscape,” wrote Nomadic Resorts. “Local influences form an integral part of the project, from vernacular traditions and materials to community involvement. The architecture references natural formations in Yala’s landscape, namely the massive rounded boulders scattered throughout the park, at a macro scale, and termite mounds, at a micro scale. Adopting a human scale in between, the camp’s main buildings appear as outcrops of boulder-like pavilions clustered organically together at either end of the site.” Related: Breezy Bungalow Mathugama Stands on Stilts Over the Sri Lankan Jungle Solar energy will provide 40 percent of the eco-resort’s energy needs and graywater is recycled for irrigation. Organic waste is composted onsite for use in the landscape, while the hotel’s conservation station is set up to monitor and protect vulnerable wildlife such as the Sri Lankan leopard. Guests can choose between the Cocoon Pool Suite, Cocoon Suite, and the Family Cocoon Suite that sport an adjacent twin-bedded Urchin tent for kids and young adults. Sixteen of the property’s suites are placed around a watering hole designed to attract wildlife. Rates at the Wild Coast Tented Lodge start at $354 a night for one or $384 for two in the Cocoon Suite. + Wild Coast Tented Lodge Images by Nomadic Resorts and Marc Hernandez Folguera

View post:
Luxurious eco-resort overlooks Sri Lankans most famous wildlife park

Nanoleaf’s new Rhythm module turns any Aurora array into a dazzling music visualizer

November 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Nanoleaf’s new Rhythm module turns any Aurora array into a dazzling music visualizer

Last year Nanoleaf unveiled Aurora – a stunning lighting array made of modular, energy-efficient LED panels . They’re continuing to develop the system, and they just unveiled the Rhythm – a new module that transforms any Aurora array into a glimmering music visualizer. Simply plug the Rhythm into an Aurora panel and fire up your stereo – it’ll listen to your tunes and light up to the beat of your favorite songs. Inhabitat has followed Nanoleaf for years – and they’ve come a long way from making LED light bulbs . The Aurora is a sophisticated lighting system that can display over 16 million colors – and it’s getting smarter by the day. When they reached out to us with their latest innovation, we knew we had to try it out for ourselves. The Rhythm is a clever device that transforms music and ambient sounds into shimmering bursts of LED light. Setting it up is a snap – simply construct an Aurora array and then plug the Rhythm module into one of the triangular panels. The device uses a built-in microphone to listen to sound – so you don’t need to plug it into your stereo – and all of the processing is conducted on-board in real-time. Nanoleaf has created an impressive smartphone app that makes it easy to control your Aurora array. The app automatically senses the configuration of the panels and it provides options for different color palettes and Rhythm patterns – with the option to download many more. We generally found that the patterns respond quite well to a wide range of music – although your mileage will vary based on how many panels you own and how your array is set up. Songs with strong beats and well-isolated elements tend to produce better results than music with complex rhythms and overlapping textures. Certain patterns like “Meteor Shower” and “Streaking Notes” tend to benefit from large, densely packed arrays, while the “Sound Bar” pattern works best with more linear arrays. The obvious application for Aurora panels is adding colorful mood lighting to a room – but the Rhythm module expands their appeal to DJs and musicians, audiovisual artists, and anyone who wants to bring home a bit of ‘Blade Runner’ futurism. We’re also excited to see the applications that makers come up with – the panels support Apple HomeKit, Google Assistant, IFTTT, and Amazon Alexa, so your Aurora array can interface with other smart devices in your house. Our only gripe is that an Aurora array can be a bit tricky to install – it takes some planning and a lot of adhesive strips, and the chips connecting the panels don’t lock in place. If I were to install an array in my home, I’d consider mounting it to a board, trimming the excess material, and then hanging it as a single unit. Overall, we’re very impressed by the vibrancy and brightness of Nanoleaf’s Aurora panels, and the Rhythm module brings a fun new dimension to the system. A single array is enough to wash an an entire room in color, and the panels are capable of subtle, pulsing hue changes as well as dazzling firework-style effects. The Nanoleaf Rhythm is currently available as a module for $49.99 or bundled along with an Aurora kit for $229.99. + Nanoleaf

Originally posted here:
Nanoleaf’s new Rhythm module turns any Aurora array into a dazzling music visualizer

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 9126 access attempts in the last 7 days.