Vietnam’s "Forest in the Sky" apartment building is topped with 50,000 trees

April 27, 2017 by  
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This lush residential complex in Hanoi takes green living to the extreme. More than 50,000 trees, shrubs and colorful flowering vines were used to cover the Forest in the Sky building, virtually camouflaging it into the surrounding forest. Along with the ample greenery, the building is equipped with various advanced green technologies and uses 20 percent less energy, and water than a traditionally-constructed building. The green “jungle” building is a prime example of green living and will set a new sustainability standard for Vietnam building practices. Besides its green exterior, which helps insulate the building, the tower is equipped with numerous sustainable features. Under the lush greenery, the interior and exterior walls are made of eco-friendly cellular lightweight concrete blocks that offer optimal insulation from extreme heat and cold as well as sound. Related: Posh new Vietnamese hotel with a lush green facade brings guests closer to nature The building also uses high-efficiency hot water boilers, low-flow plumbing fixtures, and energy-efficient lighting to reduce energy usage. Future residents will not only be able to enjoy the amazing greenery and stunning views of the location, but will also enjoy the benefits of green living such as low utility bills. The Forest in the Sky project has recently been awarded the preliminary EDGE certificate from SGS Vietnam , which is awarded to buildings that achieve a minimum standard of 20 percent less energy, water and embodied energy than traditional buildings. + Coteccons

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Vietnam’s "Forest in the Sky" apartment building is topped with 50,000 trees

World’s last male northern white rhino joins Tinder to avoid extinction

April 27, 2017 by  
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He may not make the coziest of bedfellows, but if a northern white rhino pops up on your Tinder screen, it might behoove you to swipe right. Dubbed by wildlife experts as the “world’s most eligible bachelor,” 43-year-old Sudan is the sole remaining male of his kind. “I don’t mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me,” the rhino’s profile reads on the dating app. “I perform well under pressure.” Sudan isn’t looking to make a love connection, however. There are only two remaining female northern white rhinos left, and neither are viable candidates for mating. To stave off the subspecies’s extinction, Ol Pejeta Conservancy , the Kenyan wildlife group in charge of Sudan’s care is hoping to raise $9 million for research into breeding methods such as in-vitro fertilization. Related: 21 rare one-horned Indian rhinos drown in monsoon flooding Tinder users who swipe right will be directed to a donation site where they can dig deep for the cause. “We partnered with Ol Pejeta Conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match,” Matt David, head of communications and marketing at Tinder, said in a statement. “We are optimistic given Sudan’s profile will be seen on Tinder in 190 countries and over 40 languages.” Sudan lives under round-the-clock protection at Old Pejeta with the two females, Najin and Fatu. “The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet,” said Richard Vigne, the conservancy’s CEO. “Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized.” Via Time Photos by Unsplash

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World’s last male northern white rhino joins Tinder to avoid extinction

Barn ruins transformed into contemporary home with spa

April 27, 2017 by  
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Parisian architecture studio Antonin Ziegler converted an abandoned barn into a metal-clad home crafted to evoke a “contemporary ruin.” Located in France’s Regional Natural Park of Boucles de la Seine, the adaptive reuse project, called The Barn, sits between a wheat field and river and was formerly used to store fodder for horses. With the barn’s weatherboarding worn away, the architects encased the timber structure in a new shell of zinc to preserve the building’s monolithic and distinctly agricultural gabled shape. The metal cladding was left untreated and will develop a patina over time. The original timber framework, however, is still visible from the outside and peeks through along a window that runs along the home’s stone foundation base. “The framework is the fundamental element of the new residence,” write the architects. “From the outside, it remains partially visible, beneath the zinc envelope, thus conferring an incomplete aspect to the construction, as though eroded by the surrounding nature. The windows and doors are visually understated: the archetypal house is kept at bay to give rise to another kind of habitat, more in keeping with the surrounding wilderness. A lone crack that pierces the roof and walls thus gives the project the appearance of a contemporary ruin .” Related: Zinc-clad Midden Studio hides a cozy interior with a see-through floor The interior echoes the facade’s simple and rustic appearance with a material palette of breezeblocks, battens, and exposed concrete. Natural light pours into the home on all sides and the windows frame views of the river and landscape. The ground floor is mostly open plan with few partitions, with the double-height kitchen, dining room, living room on one end, a double-height swimming spa on the other, and a master bedroom and utility room located in the middle. Four bedrooms are tucked away on the upper floor in the former hay loft. + Antonin Ziegler Via ArchDaily Images via Antonin Ziegler

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Barn ruins transformed into contemporary home with spa

Self-sufficient Platypus Bend House was built to float above torrential flooding

March 4, 2016 by  
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Self-sufficient Platypus Bend House was built to float above torrential flooding

Watch this passive PopUp House snap together like LEGOs

January 14, 2016 by  
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German architect Werner Sobek wants to create an emissions-free city in five years

October 12, 2015 by  
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Imagine an emissions-free electric city, in which homes generate more than enough power for their needs and are built to share their excess with neighbours, cars, and the surrounding grid. It sounds like a wonderful fairy tale, but German architect Werner Sobek says it can be accomplished in just five years. The architect, who was recently awarded the prestigious Fritz-Leonhardt Prize , used his award acceptance as a platform to discuss the “electric city”. Read the rest of German architect Werner Sobek wants to create an emissions-free city in five years

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German architect Werner Sobek wants to create an emissions-free city in five years

A sculptural timber roof addition turns a crumbling holiday home into a sustainable forest getaway

July 15, 2015 by  
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Rather than tear down a crumbling 1950s holiday home in the Netherlands, Bloot Architecture decided to turn the residence into a sustainable escape that feels like a modern day treehouse. The accomplish this, the team created a sculptural rooftop extension that climbs out of the original structure and seeks it’s way towards the trees of the surrounding forest. A new new off-grid solar system provides energy, and a wood stove provides warmth in the winter. Wastewater now ends up in a septic tank filtered by a halophyte filter. The rooftop extension was constructed out of timber, with flax insulation, and the facades and roofing  were covered with untreated Larch cladding. It offers space for two bedrooms and a landing with a wash table. Hanging stairs in the existing living room provides access to the new extension. The beds and storage space are built-in so no further furniture will be needed, maximizing space and creating a home that harmonizes with the natural surroundings. + Bloot Architecture The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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A sculptural timber roof addition turns a crumbling holiday home into a sustainable forest getaway

A sculptural timber roof addition turns a crumbling holiday home into a sustainable forest getaway

July 15, 2015 by  
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Rather than tear down a crumbling 1950s holiday home in the Netherlands, Bloot Architecture decided to turn the residence into a sustainable escape that feels like a modern day treehouse. The accomplish this, the team created a sculptural rooftop extension that climbs out of the original structure and seeks it’s way towards the trees of the surrounding forest. A new new off-grid solar system provides energy, and a wood stove provides warmth in the winter. Wastewater now ends up in a septic tank filtered by a halophyte filter. The rooftop extension was constructed out of timber, with flax insulation, and the facades and roofing  were covered with untreated Larch cladding. It offers space for two bedrooms and a landing with a wash table. Hanging stairs in the existing living room provides access to the new extension. The beds and storage space are built-in so no further furniture will be needed, maximizing space and creating a home that harmonizes with the natural surroundings. + Bloot Architecture The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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A sculptural timber roof addition turns a crumbling holiday home into a sustainable forest getaway

Net-zero Happy Meadow Courtyard House is a perfectly passive residence in North Carolina

June 26, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Net-zero Happy Meadow Courtyard House is a perfectly passive residence in North Carolina Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arielle Condoret Schechter , Arielle Condoret Schechter Happy Meadows , Daylighting , green architecture , green design , green homes , Happy Meadows Courtyard , net zero construction , net zero homes , net-zero house , rainwater catchment , rainwater collection , reader submission , solar home

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Net-zero Happy Meadow Courtyard House is a perfectly passive residence in North Carolina

EcoCasa Suyana is an sustainable, open-source home project in Argentina

April 27, 2015 by  
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EcoCasa Suyana is a project lead by a couple of young engineers and travelers that is the first ecological, economical and 100% open-source home in Argentina. Suyana means “hope” in Quechua language and idea of EcoCasa Suyana project is to build a green, sustainable, affordable home, that can be a model for the construction of community housing . The concept was created by Noa and Cristian, a couple who decided to change their life nine months ago. They sold their few possessions in Buenos Aires and began a trip in Latin America. During their trip, they discovered social and environmental problems that appeared to have an easy solution given the right materials and know-how. Noa and Cristian realized that “in order to improve the quality of life and reduce the impact on the environment, we need to bring together various sustainable technologies and practices into one place: in a house that can be visited and serve as an inspiration for better housing.” Each stage will be documented and the project will be 100% open source in order to share the information with people in need. The design can be adapted depending on the climate, population and the materials available in order to adapt the model to other locations. + Fund EcoCasa Suyana + Follow Cristian and Noa The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco building , eco homes , EcoCasa Suyana , Green Building , green homes , IndieGoGo , open source construction , open source home building , reader submission , Sustainable Building , Sustainable Homes

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EcoCasa Suyana is an sustainable, open-source home project in Argentina

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