Tiny indoor vertical garden grows micro-veggies on its own in 10 days

March 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

You don’t need green thumbs to grow microgreens with this EcoQube Frame. The tiny indoor vertical garden grows micro-veggies in 10 days with only fertilized water, doing all the work for you. Compact and low-maintenance, the design is suited for apartments, homes and offices of all sizes, and allows you to grow nutritious food sources quickly, without worrying about watering and feeding your plants . Aqua Design Innovations (ADI) launched EcoQube Frame on Kickstarter , and it has been a smashing success. The group tripled their goal and raised over $30,000 in the first 40 minutes of crowdfunding. Learn more about this amazing design after the break. The EcoQube Frame contains two sections with one plant pad for each section; each plant pad has hundreds of small pockets that hold seeds in place so that plants can sprout evenly. The reservoir below contains fertilized water that provides all the necessary nutrients for successful germination. “It’s really the simplest, easiest and most compact way to grow indoor plants vertically without soil,” said the designers. “It’s also great for those who don’t feel like they have a green thumb. Since the reservoir waters the plants automatically, you don’t have to worry about over watering or root rot – which is a common problem when growing plants or micro-veggies.” Related: Smart Taiga Tower is like having an 80 square foot garden right inside your home EcoQube’s seed pads are all made from natural, 100 percent compostable fibers, and provide just enough water to allow the plants to grow. The designers claim that EcoQube can grow up to $25 worth of micro-veggies in a little over a week, and pays for itself after only one month of growing. + EcoQube Frame Kickstarter + Aqua Design Innovations (ADI)

Read the original post:
Tiny indoor vertical garden grows micro-veggies on its own in 10 days

Cloud House makes it rain on demand with creative water harvesting system

March 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

You won’t have to do a rain dance to make it rain at the Cloud House—sitting in one of its rocking chairs should do the trick. Artist Matthew Mazzotta created the Cloud House, a gabled pavilion with a cloud-like sculpture that releases collected rainwater whenever someone sits inside the building. Crafted from reclaimed materials , the art installation was commissioned in Springfield, Missouri to bring attention to our dependence on natural systems, like the water cycle, that grow the food we eat. “Located at Springfield , MO’s largest farmers’ market, CLOUD HOUSE is a poetic counterpoint to the busy market, inviting visitors to a meditative space in which they can slow down, enjoy the fresh edible plants, and listen to rain on a tin roof,” writes Mazzotta. Topped with a cloud-shaped resin sculpture attached by a pipe, the gabled structure is built of barn wood and tin reclaimed from an abandoned Amish farm. Edible plants grow on the windowsills and the building’s two ends are left completely open to reveal a sparse interior decorated with two rocking chairs and a small table. https://vimeo.com/189592923 Related: Open House Renovates an Abandoned Building into a Transforming Open Air Theater Rainwater is collected with a gutter system that funnels the water into an underground storage tank. When someone sits on the rocking chair, a pump is triggered to bring the harvested rainwater up to the artificial cloud where it’s released as droplets onto the roof. The rainwater simulation waters the windowsill plants and creates a “warm pleasant sound of rain on a tin roof.” During periods of drought, however, the cloud will not rain to illustrate man’s dependence on the natural world. + Matthew Mazzotta Via Dezeen Images by Tim Hawley

Read more here:
Cloud House makes it rain on demand with creative water harvesting system

Parasitic wooden cubes slash Parisian building’s energy consumption by 75%

March 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Parasitic wooden cubes slash Parisian building’s energy consumption by 75%

Stéphane Malka has designed a clever way of optimizing the energy efficiency of older urban structures while working within the restrictions of Parisian building codes. Malka’s Plug-in City 75 design envisions attaching parasitic wooden cubes to the facade of a 1970s-era building, extending the living space and significantly reducing the building’s annual energy consumption by approximately 75 percent. The innovative design is slated for a 1970s-era building in the French capital’s 16th arrondissement. Like similar buildings in the city, this one is burdened with low energy performance due to thermal bridges, poor insulation, and permeable windows. However, current building laws are quite restrictive and do not allow for the structures to be raised to make way for better, more efficient space. Related: Parasitic prefabs mounted atop buildings create affordable green housing in Paris Malka’s solution is to incorporate a type of parasitic architecture to improve the building’s energy envelope. According to the design, a series of bio-sourced wooden cubes would be mounted onto the facade, extending the apartments horizontally through openings in the exterior. Extending the apartments outwards would divide the total energy consumption of the building by four. This would significantly reduce the rehabilitated building’s annual energy consumption from its current 190KWh per square meter to 45KWh per square meter. The modular boxes , made from wood particles and chips are quite lightweight, which allows for easy transport and on-site assembly. Once mounted onto the building, the cubed extensions would not only add more living space and light to the interior, but would also create an inner garden courtyard on the first floor. The new facade would be draped in hanging greenery, greatly improving the structure’s overall aesthetic. + Malka Architecture

Read the rest here:
Parasitic wooden cubes slash Parisian building’s energy consumption by 75%

Timberland transforms recycled plastic bottles into shoes, bags

March 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Timberland transforms recycled plastic bottles into shoes, bags

For its latest collection, Timberland is turning to the bottle—the plastic bottle, that is. The outdoor-wear maker has teamed up with Thread , a Pittsburgh, Penn.-based manufacturer of sustainable fabrics, to transform plastic bottles from the streets and canals of Haiti into a dapper collection of footwear, bags, and T-shirts. The Timberland x Thread collaboration goes “beyond environmental sustainability,” according to Timberland. Not only does the partnership turn an ecological blight into a resource but it also creates social value in the form of cleaner neighborhoods and job opportunities for one of the planet’s poorest nations. “The Timberland x Thread collection is incredible proof that style and sustainability can go hand-in-hand,” Colleen Vien, director of sustainability for Timberland, said in a statement. “This collection delivers good with every fiber, not just by recycling plastic bottles that would otherwise end up littering the streets, but also by creating job opportunities and cleaner neighborhoods in Haiti. Related: Take a first look at Timberland’s new boots and bags made out of recycled plastic “Consumers can feel good about pulling on their Timberland x Thread boots or backpack, and know they are making a positive impact in someone else’s life,” she added The Timberland x Thread capsule comprises five styles of men’s shoes and boots, a duffel bag and a backpack, and one T-shirt. All incorporate Thread’s “Ground to Good” fabric, which the certified B Corp. spins in the United States using 50 percent post-consumer recycled polyethylene terephthalate , better known as PET. Thread says that every yard of fabric can be traced throughout the supply chain, from bottle collection to textile creation and delivery to the manufacturer. The “bottle to boot” process employs more than 1,300 bottle collectors, entrepreneurs, and manufacturing employees in Haiti alone. “At Thread, we believe that dignified jobs cure poverty—and our fabric creates those jobs,” said Ian Rosenberger, founder and CEO of Thread. “Our partnership with Timberland marks a seismic shift in the fashion industry, combining Timberland’s large supply chain and loyal customer base with Thread’s responsible, transparent approach to creating premium fabrics and vital jobs in the developing world. The Timberland x Thread collection is a major step towards improving the way our clothes are made.” + Timberland + Thread

Excerpt from: 
Timberland transforms recycled plastic bottles into shoes, bags

Dramatic disintegration of Canada permafrost threatens huge carbon release

March 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Dramatic disintegration of Canada permafrost threatens huge carbon release

Permafrost , or frozen soil , is rapidly collapsing across a 52,000 square mile area in northwest Canada – about the size of the entire state of Alabama. New research from the Northwest Territories Geological Survey (NTGS) finds the permafrost thaw is intensifying, a dramatic disintegration that could speed up climate change . When these slabs of Arctic permafrost collapse, they send silt and mud rich in carbon into waterways. The research shows the decay is resulting in landslides that could alter large swaths of landscape. Similar phenomenon have been noted in Scandinavia, Siberia, and Alaska. The new study sought to measure permafrost decay in Canada using satellite images and other data – and Steven Kokelj of NTGS, lead author of a paper published in February by Geology , said “things have really taken off” in the face of climate change. Scientists from universities in New Zealand and Canada also contributed to the research. Related: Alaskan permafrost could melt in the next 55 years, says world’s leading expert The scientists observed permafrost disintegrating in 40- to 60-mile stretches of the terrain, revealing “extensive landscapes [that] remain poised for climate-driven change.” Other research has suggested thawing permafrost could lead to the collapse of coastlines or creation of new lakes or valleys. All that silt and mud could affect fish and other species living in the waterways, limiting development of aquatic plants, but scientists still need to determine how exactly this added mud might impact fish. Also up for debate is how quickly the carbon in melted permafrost becomes carbon dioxide (CO2). Scientist Suzanne Tank of the University of Alberta told InsideClimate News the carbon in permafrost becomes coarse particles that don’t become CO2 right away. But Swedish researchers conducted a study suggesting soil particles are in fact converted rapidly to CO2 when the soil is carried along to the sea. Via InsideClimate News Images via Wikimedia Commons and U.S. Geological Survey on Flickr

Excerpt from:
Dramatic disintegration of Canada permafrost threatens huge carbon release

Architects transform an old hay barn into a stunning minimalist home

February 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Architects transform an old hay barn into a stunning minimalist home

OFIS Architects have converted an old hay barn in Slovenia into a gorgeous living space. The barn was originally used to house cattle on the first floor and store hay on the upper level, but had been left empty for years. To convert the space into a comfortable loft space without sacrificing the building’s local vernacular, the architects were determined to use as much as the existing structure as possible. The Slovenian countryside is full of decrepit barns that serve as symbols of the country’s rural lifestyle. To pay respects to the local vernacular, the architects made impressive strides to use what they could of the barn’s original materials . Related: Architects transform 18th century barn with seamless contemporary extension Surprisingly, the renovation team was able to maintain almost all of the external wooden cladding and concrete roof slates. A few strategic renovations were made to include windows and an opening for the front porch to let in natural light to the home, and a ramp that previously led animals into the barn was also fixed to serve the same purpose for the new, human inhabitant. https://youtu.be/cBDAeyO7WC0 Inside, the home has an open floor plan with minimal furnishings and exposed wooden beams. The interior floors, walls and furniture are covered in locally-sourced spruce panels, resulting in a homey cabin feel. The open living and dining area make up the main volume, and a raised bedroom was installed in the back. The kitchen, sauna, fireplace and bathroom are all strategically placed out of sight behind a wall of sliding vertical planks to further open the living space. + OFIS Architects Via Ambienti TV Photography by Tomaž Gregori?

See the original post here: 
Architects transform an old hay barn into a stunning minimalist home

Couple converts 16-year-old van into a compact solar home on wheels

February 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Couple converts 16-year-old van into a compact solar home on wheels

An increasing number of digital nomads are replacing their conventional houses with practical, mobile homes powered by renewable energy technologies . Freelancer photographer Norbert Juhász and his fiancée Dora, a writer, have joined the fray with a 16-year-old van they transformed into a solar-powered home on wheels, and they’re driving it from Budapest to Morocco. While the exterior of the van is unremarkable, its interior packs all the amenities the couple needs on their journey. A multifunctional seat turns into a bed for two and includes a storage space and electrical system underneath. Opposite the bed is a small kitchen unit with a gas cooktop, gas cylinder, sink and a large water tank with a pressure-sensing pump. The tank is connected to an extra hook-up that leads to the rear of the van, where the water is used for quick showers. An L-shaped cabinet accommodates a refrigerator and more storage spaces, and features another section that doubles as a seating structure. Related: How this photographer escaped the grid with her tiny Teardrop Trailer The vehicle is powered by a 12-volt electrical system charged by either the 250-watt solar panels mounted on the roof, or the engine’s generator. Excess energy can be stored in 200-Ah batteries attached to an inverter. The couple spent around $7,200 for the van’s transformation, including its custom-made furniture. They will travel through Southern Europe all the way to Morocco, and document their journey on the Rundabella website and Facebook page . + Norbert Juhász + Rundabella Via Treehugger Photos by Norbert Juhász

Go here to read the rest:
Couple converts 16-year-old van into a compact solar home on wheels

Fallingwater Institute adds four timber ‘portals’ to Frank Lloyd Wright landmark

February 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Fallingwater Institute adds four timber ‘portals’ to Frank Lloyd Wright landmark

Students participating in the Fallingwater Institute’s summer residence program will now have a beautiful new home-base from which to study the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright design and national monument. Architecture firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson designed four “modest wood portals” to provide updated lodging to the rustic 1960s teaching facilities. Wright completed work on the iconic Fallingwater home in 1939. The stunning design, which was built for the Kaufmann family, sits over a waterfall in southwest Pennsylvania. Today, the home is a National Historic Landmark run by the Fallingwater Institute, which has been offering summer residency programs to architecture lovers of all ages for over 20 years. Related: Frank Lloyd Wright’s unbuilt Trinity Chapel brought to life in vivid renderings Now, students will be able to live a bit more comfortably as they study thanks to four new cabin-like structures built on the High Meadow farm next to the main home. The new residences are made up of four wooden cabins clad in a cedar stained shale gray. On the interior, built-in shelves and most of the furniture were constructed out of simple plywood, and cork flooring is used throughout the cabins. A horizontal pine screen, which was harvested and milled on site , connects the four cabins, which all have stunning views of the surroundinga. The angled nature of the design was strategic to provide shade in the summertime while also optimizing air ventilation throughout the cabins. Bill James, project architect from Bohlin Cywinski Jackson’s Pittsburgh office, explains that the four new cabins were designed to be subtle, but comfortable additions for summer tenants: “The building’s main entry welcomes visitors into a central screened porch, which joins the new architecture to an existing cabin and serves as the outdoor gathering and dining space,” he said. “A horizontal screen, made of Norway Spruce harvested and milled on site, extends from the main cabin and continues along the walkway leading to the dwellings.” + Fallingwater Institute + Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Via Archinet Photography by Nic Lehoux

Read the original post: 
Fallingwater Institute adds four timber ‘portals’ to Frank Lloyd Wright landmark

Mecanoo to update Washington’s MLK Library with massive green roof

February 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mecanoo to update Washington’s MLK Library with massive green roof

Renovating historic architectural landmarks is no easy task, but Dutch firm, Mecanoo , will be taking on the responsibility of breathing new life into the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C, originally designed by modernist master Ludwig Mies van der Rohe . Although the plans certainly call for retaining the original design’s most prominent features, the new version will include contemporary touches focused on adding more public space, such as an expansive green rooftop terrace . https://youtu.be/BUORTgTKBkg The library is a massive 37,000 square feet landmarked building that opened in 1972. The original design was focused on transparency and light, metaphors for the pillars of freedom and knowledge so often referenced by Dr. King. Related: Cedar Rapids turns tragedy into triumph with new LEED Platinum public library Working in collaboration with local firm Martinez+Johnson Architecture , the building will soon be getting a fresh new makeover that still pays homage to Dr King’s legacy. The main entrance and two adjacent cores will become the focal point of the space, opening them up to more light and community interaction. A Great Hall will be at the heart of the building, serving as a central area specifically setup to host cultural and informal events. The design also calls for new spacious stairwells to add a more fluid motion of traffic to the interior. The distribution of the library’s various departments and functional areas will also be rearranged to make the space more people-friendly. The glazed perimeter, previously lined with books shelves, will be converted into public areas. Visitors will be able to enjoy a new café on the ground floor and an expansive green rooftop terrace with beautiful views of the urban surroundings. + Mecanoo + Martinez+Johnson Architecture Via World Architecture News

See original here:
Mecanoo to update Washington’s MLK Library with massive green roof

Flexible trailer-office tucked into an old ambulance garage in Portland

February 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Flexible trailer-office tucked into an old ambulance garage in Portland

Designers are constantly coming up with new flexible solutions for urban office spaces– from multi-use backyard structures to road-ready office pods  . Exploring this concept further, Portland-based studio LOS OSOS teamed up with Coroflot , a website that connects designers with clients and peers, to design and build a mobile trailer -office which can be installed on any unoccupied urban lot. Their first Mobile Work Unit (MWU) is located inside an old ambulance garage in downtown Portland, and functions as a workspace for the retail shop Hand-Eye Supply. The team wheeled a trailer into the space and built the structure in place using a post-and-beam structural system, which limits the wall’s structural role. The designers used polycarbonate as siding in order to allow natural light to reach the interior while functioning as an acoustic barrier. Locally-sourced, custom-milled, and kiln-dried wood from Douglas fir trees was used for the walls, while modular furniture systems, specially developed for the project, define different personal spaces. The new office space can be repurposed and adjusted for different work scenarios. It can be easily adapted and expanded to accommodate a growing company. Related: Tiny workplace on wheels can make each day at the office different! “I see the next version in so many different flavors—office, retail, showroom , home,” said Laurence Sarrazin, principal of LOS OSOS. “And each has its own challenges and parameters that would determine what the skin would be, the size, how much light is let in, how much storage, all those fun design problems. It would be exciting to find manufacturers.” + LOS OSOS + Coroflot Lead photo by Josh Partee

Original post:
Flexible trailer-office tucked into an old ambulance garage in Portland

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1024 access attempts in the last 7 days.