This interactive woven canopy at MoMA PS1 changes colors as the sun sets

June 30, 2017 by  
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New Yorkers looking for a place to cool off during the summer will do well to duck into Long Island City’s MoMA PS1 – and it’s not just because the museum’s galleries are air-conditioned. A new interactive installation there, called Lumen , is an experience well-worth the trip. Lumen feels like a bright underwater landscape with 250 jellyfish-like tubular structures that interact with light, heat and movement. As the sun sets, colorful solar-powered lights come on, transforming the entire courtyard with an otherworldly vibe. Designed by Jenny Sabin Studio and debuting to the public June 29, Lumen is the winner of The Museum of Modern Arts and MoMA PS1’s 18th edition of the Young Architects Program and will serve as the setting for the 20th season of the Warm Up outdoor concert series this summer. The project integrates various disciplines, including biology, materials science, mathematics, engineering and design, to produce an artistic micro-climate that is both environmentally responsive and beautiful. The canopy is made of over 1,000,000 yards of digitally knitted and robotically woven fiber. During the day, the sun shines through the gaps in the canopy’s fabric to create murals of light and shadows against the concrete walls.Because the design requirements called for shade, water and seating, a responsive water system was incorporated into the hanging fabric tubes. Called stalactites, the tubes spray a fine mist when bodies draw near. In addition, 100 recycled spool stools (also robotically woven) provide a place to rest tired feet after a day roaming through the galleries, meeting another criteria that designs incorporate sustainability and recycling in its elements. The recycled fabric absorbs solar power over the course of the day and then emits it at night. Related: MoMA PS1 unveils futuristic solar canopy that reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement Lumen appeals to the senses; the soft white fabric is juxtaposed against the hard wooden seats and floors engraved with white geometric patterns. The installation invites visitors to play among the hanging fabric as water hits their skin. Lumen exudes both weightlessness and levity as the canopy sways in the breeze during the day and then almost an eeriness when it morphs into a photoluminescent wonderland. Once the Warm Up music series kicks off July 1, custom lighting incorporated into the installation’s design will complement the shows to provide both a visual and aural experience. All of which should make for one vibrant summer. Lumen will be on view at MoMA PS1’s courtyard from June 29 though August 27. + Jenny Sabin Studio All images by Dorkys Ramos for Inhabitat

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This interactive woven canopy at MoMA PS1 changes colors as the sun sets

Biodesign Competition winners announced – algae takes center stage

October 5, 2016 by  
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When it comes to design, mother nature has a lot to teach us. The field of Biodesign has emerged as an exciting new discipline which integrates the best ideas from nature with the cutting edge of modern technology, fostering technological breakthroughs that could allow us to live better lives, more in harmony with our environment. We recently invited architects and designers from all across the world to submit their wildest visions for a Biodesigned future, and they delivered so much creativity and ingenuity that it was extremely difficult to narrow it all down to a short-list and then determine a winner. From algae structures, to aquaponic fish homes, to self-healing homes, we were thoroughly impressed by the entrants of our Biodesign Competition . And the winner is… GRAND PRIZE WINNER: Chlorella Oxygen Pavilion by Adam Miklosi Designer Adam Miklosi was inspired by the concept of symbiosis to create a futuristic oxygen bar called the Chlorella Pavillion which would allow tired people to enter, relax, and fill up on energizing, oxygen-rich air. Miklosi proposes piping living algae through the structure to create a swirling “algae fountain” throughout the exterior and interior of the space. Like all photosynthesizing organisms, algae naturally consumes CO2 and produces oxygen through respiration. Humans relaxing (and breathing) in the space would give the algae the CO2 it needs to survive, and, in turn, the algae would give Chlorella Pavilion visitors an extra oxygen boost. HEALING SPACES CATEGORY WINNER: Chlorella Oxygen Pavilion by Adam Miklosi The Chlorella Pavillon was the category winner for ‘Healing Spaces’ in addition to being selected by the judges as the Grand Prize Winner. Designer Adam Miklosi’s algae pavilions are built with molded beech wood and covered with a semi-transparent isolating film. Each pavilion is designed to live and breath interdependently with humans using photosynthesis – exhaled carbon dioxide and fresh oxygen mixes in the central algae fountain. The algae-filled water then circulates in tubes spiraling around the structure that soak up sunlight. Each pavilion is meant to be a “temple of relaxation” in a hectic urban environment. HOUSING CATEGORY WINNER: Self Healing House by Edwin Indera Waskita Designer Edwin Indera Waskita’s Self-Healing House explores the value of social sustainability by fostering communities in which humans, animals, plants, and the environment benefit from a mutual symbiosis. The proposal transforms marginalized city spaces into dynamic and productive zones (like urban farms ) to ensure positive and sustainable social growth. The Self-Healing House relies on community participation to improve both the quality of life of inhabitants and ecological balance, and it benefits residents through improved resource distribution. The Self-Healing House is wrapped in an “ecological skin” of mosses and plants which provide a source of food and water for birds. In exchange, by depositing new seeds and plant life, birds will encourage new growth of the skin. HONORABLE MENTIONS: Aquaponic Future Housing by Mihai Chiriac: Aquaponic Future Houses are 3-story homes made out of 3D-printed biodegradable vegetable-based bioplastic , housing living plants and fish in a closed-loop system, where the plants feed the fish, the fish feed the plants, plants produce oxygen for the home’s inhabitants and the fish produce food. In order to create a more sustainable environment, the building uses built-in hydroponics and aquaculture for growing food at home. The home is intended for neglected urban spaces to help urban dwellers live a greener, healthier life. Jellyfish Lodge by Janine Hung: The Jellyfish Lodge proposes to rehabilitate the world’s most polluted river slums by removing waste , treating water, growing food, and purifying air all through solar power. The structure’s jellyfish-inspired tentacles will remove garbage from the water while testing water toxicity levels, and microbial digestion chambers within the design will break down harmful microorganisms before returning treated water to the river. An aquaponics system would produce food for nearby residents. Oculus emergency shelter by Chalmers University of Technology: Oculus is a prototype for a rapidly deployable shelter inspired by the Beehive house – a traditional Syrian dwelling with bionic geometry. With a focus on material efficiency, the Oculus is a small den-style single-family unit made of expanded polystyrene (EPS). The dwelling consists of 29 rings set inside each other to form a stepping shell structure. The prototype was developed by 4 students at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden focusing on material efficiency, off-site manufacturing and low-tech assembly. It was developed as a case study through work with the Al-Zataari camp in Jordan. Algaevator urban revitalization by Jie Zhang: The Algaevator inserts an algae farm into a weather-tight, transparent and lightweight roofing system that can be used in abandoned buildings to help revitalize urban environments. The algae can be used for various applications in consumer products and alternative fuels. The Algaevator’s funnel shape optimizes sun exposure for algae production and can also harvest rainwater for additional sustainability. Hybrid Fibrous Morphologies by Ruxandra Gruioniu: Ruxandra Gruioniu’s Hybrid Fibrous Morphologies project seeks to create a new bio-integrative material system out of fungus. Gruioniu experimented with fusing living and non-living matter to develop a cost and energy-efficient architectural solution that resembles the biological model. Fungus is a very simple multicellular microorganism consisting of numerous filaments (hyphae) that have the ability to branch out and reconnect with each other to form a biological transport network over a manmade structure, such as a metal lattice. Urban Pure BioTower Dennis Dollens: Urban Pure: BioTowers are environmentally-friendly buildings for housing, schools, or offices. The design for the towers was inspired by the shape of plants and trees to support healthy living. Enhanced using synthetic biology, AI, and biorobotics, BioTowers “eat” air pollution while contributing energy and green spaces to modern cities. + Inhabitat Biodesign Competition

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Biodesign Competition winners announced – algae takes center stage

‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

April 7, 2016 by  
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Geometric shapes come together to form a smooth design that plays with space and function. Called Limits, the idea is “a compact table that pushes our perception of physical and philosophical boundaries,” states Singaporean designer, Kimberly Koh. Created entirely from wooden flat triangles, the joints have been smoothed over, giving the illusion of weightlessness and a sleek composition. Tapered joints and contrasting wood tones maintain the contrast between the various triangular planes, which therefore appear independent from one another. The absence of any vertical edges distorts the sense of perspective, thus distorting the ‘spatial limits’ of the table. The projecting, cantilevered design establishes a sense of imbalance, which suggests that the center of gravity will shift when items are placed on top of it. The middle compartment is removable, creating a more flexible design for users, who can mold the table to suit their creative and practical needs. + Florence Institute The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

Five stunning gardens unveiled for the International Garden Festival in Quebec

February 19, 2016 by  
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Five stunning gardens unveiled for the International Garden Festival in Quebec

INFOGRAPHIC: What you need to know about rising sea levels

February 10, 2016 by  
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We hear a lot about the rising sea levels, but besides the obvious, what does that really mean? Global warming, melting glaciers and thermal expansion is causing oceans to rise, and at this point, we aren’t going to be able to stop it. That means cities like Washington D.C., Miami and New York City are going to start seeing some terrible floods. Addressing the problem could cost billions of dollars. The following infographic is a quick and dirty guide to rising sea levels and what our future holds (it isn’t good). Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: What you need to know about rising sea levels

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INFOGRAPHIC: What you need to know about rising sea levels

Fabric Chair is a stunning sci-fi design made out of hardened fabric

December 21, 2015 by  
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This sci-fi-looking chair – called Fabric Chair – is an investigation into the use of fabric as a structural material in furniture design. A special resin was developed to harden fabric placed on a rigid mold, which hardens the fabric in place to become structural while retaining its soft appearance. The design was part of eVolo Magazine’s 2015 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition , which recognizes innovative design. The first place-winning Fabric Chair was created by I-Ting Tsai, Xixi Zheng, Yiru Yun, and Somdatta Majumdar from the United Kingdom. + eVolo

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Fabric Chair is a stunning sci-fi design made out of hardened fabric

Incredible Napmobile lets you test drive a cozy mattress on the road

September 17, 2015 by  
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A classic old home in China is transformed with a mirror-clad exhibition space

July 24, 2015 by  
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These life-sized willow whales swim through a sea of plastic bottles to raise pollution awareness

July 16, 2015 by  
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A sculpture of two life-sized whales, made from Somerset willow and 70,000 upcycled plastic bottles, has been unveiled in Bristol to mark the city’s status as the UK’s first European Green Capital . Weighing six tons, The Bristol Whales will be situated in Bristol’s Millennium Square from July 17 to September 1. The artwork depicts a blue whale and humpback whale swimming through an ‘ocean’ of plastic bottles, and represents the fragility of our oceans and the increasing threat of plastic pollution. Visitors can add their own pledge message in a virtual bottle using The Bristol Whales app, which will then be displayed on a big screen above the whales. The Bristol Whales has been designed and built by Cod Steaks , initiated by Arts Project Earth and funded by Arts Council England as part of Bristol’s year as European Green Capital. + The Bristol Whales  The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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These life-sized willow whales swim through a sea of plastic bottles to raise pollution awareness

Rogers Partners & ASD to team up for new St. Petersburg pier

April 30, 2015 by  
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St. Petersburg is getting a new pier — again. A group of Tampa-based architects, including ASD , Rogers Partners Architects+Urban Designers , and Ken Smith Landscape Architect have been announced as the winners of the second St. Petersburg Pier redesign competition. After the Florida city decided not to implement the original design proposed by Michael Maltzen Architecture due to strong public opposition, a new competition was announced. “Pier Park,” the winning proposal, takes a more scaled down (and affordable) approach to redesigning the site’s landmark 1970s pier by focusing on public experience rather than “architectural intervention.” Read the rest of Rogers Partners & ASD to team up for new St. Petersburg pier Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: asd , Design Competition , design contest , florida pier project , ken smith landscape architecture , pier competition design , pier park , pier redesign , Rogers Partners , st. petersberg florida

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