Shigeru Ban Architects unveil plans for the worlds tallest hybrid timber building

June 6, 2017 by  
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Pritzker Prize-winning architect Shigeru Ban just unveiled plans for the world’s tallest timber hybrid high-rise, the Terrace House . Slated for Vancouver’s Coal Harbour neighborhood, the angular structure will have multiple tiers of abundant greenery rising up through a latticework frame made out of locally-sourced timber . According to the design description, “meticulously engineered timber” will be used to create the building’s latticework frame , which will be interspersed with an abundance of greenery rising up from the ground floor. The proposed design will create not only the world’s largest timber hybrid structure, but will be a luminous icon for Vancouver’s growing cityscape. Ban’s proposed design will hold court right next to the city’s famed Evergreen Building , designed by late architect Arthur Erickson . Related: Nation’s largest cross-laminated timber academic building is an icon of sustainability The stunning project, which will be led by Vancouver-based developer PortLiving , was carefully crafted by Ban to stand out for its cutting-edge design without taking away from the existing architecture, “We have brought together the best of the best – a team of true experts in creative collaboration, working together for the first time ever on a single project. The result is truly a once-in-a-lifetime project setting new standards in design and construction,” said Macario Reyes, founder and CEO of PortLiving. “Every detail has been considered right down to the specific foliage on the terraces. It only made sense to bring on Cornelia Oberlander to continue her vision and create continuity between the Evergreen Building by Arthur Erickson and Terrace House by Shigeru Ban.” Although Ban’s design is sure to be a stellar icon of timber architecture , it won’t be the city’s only wooden wonder; the world’s current tallest timber building, Brock Commons , was completed in Vancouver just last year. + Terrace House + Shigeru Ban Architects Via Archdaily Images via PortLiving

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Shigeru Ban Architects unveil plans for the worlds tallest hybrid timber building

This amazing underground house in Greece frames views of an olive grove

June 5, 2017 by  
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This underground holiday home in Greece is topped with a green roof that offers panoramic views of the Peloponnese peninsula. The owners commissioned LASSA Architects to design a house that would activate the periphery of the plot and provide a vantage point from which to observe the surroundings. The 1614-square-foot Villa Ypsilon is located in an olive grove in southern Peloponnese. A three-pronged concrete shell forms the roof and establishes three courtyards with different exposures to the sun. An eye-shaped swimming pool and sun deck are partially sheltered underneath a concrete lip that defines the green roof. Two other curved facades frame a sunken seating area and the main entrance to the building. Related: Take a Peek at a Stunning Secret Swiss Villa Hidden Into a Mountainside! “The design of the concrete shell and the courtyards’ orientation is such that it produces shadows at specific times of the day,” said the architects. “We are interested in the idea of form integration. That is, that form can be the result of overlapping and precise design decisions . . . in this case the vaulting concrete shell is structural, its bisecting axes frames specific views, its sloping [form] makes it walkable and its extent is a result of environmental optimization.” Related: Beautiful Underground Aloni House Blends in With The Earth Most of the structure is prefabricated, which significantly reduced assembly costs and construction time. The architects used a CNC machine to fabricate prototypes of the concrete shell and develop the final shape of the house. The use of locally sourced materials – such as concrete, terrazzo and marble – root the design in its cultural and geographic context. + LASSA Architects Via Dezeen Photos by NAARO

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This amazing underground house in Greece frames views of an olive grove

How climate change could alter the environment in 100 years

June 5, 2017 by  
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Want to know exactly what President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement means? Here are some projections of how climate change could alter our planet in the upcoming century. From rising sea levels to a thawing Arctic and bleached coral reefs , the Earth we leave to our grandchildren could be a remarkably different place. Director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies Gavin Schmidt told Business Insider we can’t stop global warming . It’s already in motion even if we were to curb all carbon emissions tomorrow. But Schmidt said it’s possible for us to slow climate change so we can better adapt to our changing world. Business Insider drew from several sources to examine what our world could look like – if nations do indeed stick to the Paris Agreement. Related: Several scientists predict the apocalypse will occur uncomfortably soon We’ll see more temperature anomalies – or how much a given temperature is off the normal temperature of a region. Greenland summers could be utterly free of ice by 2050. Tropical summers could have 50 percent more extreme heat days by 2050. Water resources will be impacted, with scientists predicting severe droughts will occur more frequently. Rising sea levels could also change life on the coasts of numerous countries, and unexpected collapses of ice shelves could erratically change sea levels. Oceans could rise two to three feet by 2100, which could displace around four million people even in the best case scenarios. Meanwhile oceans will warm as they absorb carbon dioxide and lead to acidification that threatens coral reefs – nearly all of tropical reefs could be harmed. Half of those tropical coral reefs are still under threat in best case scenarios. Schmidt said the 2100 Earth could be between “a little bit warmer than today and a lot warmer than today.” We have an opportunity now to curb emissions and slow climate change through solutions like renewable energy or carbon capture technology. We just have to take action. Via Business Insider Images via NASA , Andreas Kambanis on Flickr , and Matt Kieffer on Flickr

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How climate change could alter the environment in 100 years

World’s first ‘cranehouse’ hoisted over Bristol harbor is completely carbon neutral

June 5, 2017 by  
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Could a new urban vacation trend take the trees out of treehouses ? The world’s first “cranehouse” has opened in Bristol and it’s every bit as spectacular as their conventional trunk-supported counterparts. Designed by vacation specialists Canopy & Stars , the tiny structure is hoisted by a cargo crane 26 feet over Bristol Harbor. What’s more, the low-impact wooden structure is completely carbon neutral, and it was built using sustainable materials . The “hanging basket” is a collaboration between Canopy & Stars and DIY company, B&Q, who decorated the space with a chic collection of sustainable furnishings. Touches of nature are found throughout the space, including walls inlaid with tree branches, a watering can shower, and a bed made out of a reclaimed tree trunk . Industrial hints such as copper finials, polished concrete, and natural vegetable-fiber mats complete the rustic, yet sophisticated interior design. Related: 9 treehouses you can actually rent for an off-the-ground getaway Along with a “living painting” by local artist Anthony Garrett, the design focused on creating a similar “multi-sensory experience” one might experience in a true treehouse. Scents of woodlands such as lavender, sage, and bark waft through the interior. Wild flowers are planted in recycled wooden crates on the exterior of the house and various pollinators were planted on the roof to attract bees and butterflies. Guests at Crane 29 will be able to enjoy the beautiful off-grid retreat by spending their time swinging in the indoor hammock and taking in the spectacular panoramic views of the harbor. Reservations, which run £185 a night, include a gourmet breakfast basket delivered to the house in the morning. Tom Dixon, managing director of Canopy & Stars, explains that the project was a labor of love for the company, “It’s taken three years of planning and design, and only three weeks of building, but we got there. What started as a dream has now become a reality,” said “We hope people enjoy their stays in this amazing building and wake up to the great outdoors feeling they are truly part of this pocket of nature in the city – a real natural high.” Crane 29 will only be opened to guests for just 100 days, but all of the profits from the rental space will be donated to the environmental organization, Friends of the Earth . + Canopy & Stars Via Telegraph Images via Canopy & Stars

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World’s first ‘cranehouse’ hoisted over Bristol harbor is completely carbon neutral

New Feyenoord sports center has a perforated facade made from weathered steel

June 1, 2017 by  
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A perforated weathered steel envelope shelters the interior of the new Feynoord Training Complex in Rotterdam , providing privacy and daylight for players and staff. Moederscheim Moonen Architects designed the complex as a new landmark for the city which will house various medical and wellness facilities, changing rooms for players, hospitality spaces and an auditorium. Offering facilities in line with the needs of a modern football club, the Feynoord Training Complex will be realized in a sub-area of the new Stadionpark district in Rotterdam as part of a larger masterplan . The building opens up towards two football pitches, while its rear facade “turns its back” to the public road. This provides privacy while enabling as much transparency and interaction as possible between the fields and the building. Related: Zigzagging Het Anker community center in the Netherlands is partially buried underground A sharply delineated facade doubles as a pronounced roof overhang . This element is made up of trapezium-shaped, expanded weathering steel panels with varying degrees of perforation . A red hue referencing the club’s distinctive colors reinforces the unique Feyenoord atmosphere. + Moederscheim Moonen Architects

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New Feyenoord sports center has a perforated facade made from weathered steel

This stunning vintage Airstream is a Scandinavian design dream come true

June 1, 2017 by  
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We always love a great Airstream conversion , and this Scandinavian-inspired renovation is making us green with design envy. Natasha Lawyer and Brett Bashaw renovated the vintage 1971 Airstream Sovereign by implementing simple, but gorgeous design principles inspired by Scandinavian functionality. Using white walls and semi-minimalistic decor, the tiny 200-square-feet space is now a beautiful home the couple affectionately calls their “ Tin Can Homestead .” The adventurous couple are no strangers to breathing life into vintage vehicles. Before buying the old airstream, they converted a 1978 Volkswagen van into a livable camper to travel around the country. Once that trip was over, they had been permanently bitten by the tiny home living bug and decided to buy the 1971 Airstream, which gave them more living space. After one year of renovations and restorations, they now have a beautiful 200-square-foot home with an amazing interior. Related: 7 retro-chic Airstream renovations The Tin Can Homestead is a stunning example of Airstream conversion done right. The renovation process as well as the interior design was inspired by Scandinavian design, meaning that the process focused on custom-made furniture and a clean, clutter-free design. The result is a living space that is light and airy, but doesn’t take itself too seriously. All-white walls and ceilings open up the interior, which is enhanced with fun hints of colors, warm wood tones, and personal knick-knacks from the couple’s travels. The couple’s most prized possession – besides their two little dogs – is a patterned daybed mattress that adds a hint of “bohemian eclectic glam” to the interior design . The kitchen design is an enviable space thanks to its clutter-free layout and simple black-and-white tiled backsplash. The bedroom is also a warm space, with a king-size bed that is big enough for 6-foot tall Bashaw. The camper is equipped with plenty of storage and various hanging plants around the home also enhance the healthy, airy atmosphere. Although the transformation resulted in a beautifully mellow space, the conversion process was anything but uncomplicated. When asked about the hardest part of the process, Lawyer said that building furniture to fit around the airstream’s curves presented quite the challenge, “Never again will I build furniture to fit inside what is basically a Twinkie.” Such a dreamy day in Seattle today so I threw open all the windows and did a little planting. A post shared by tin can homestead (@tincanhomestead) on May 3, 2017 at 4:30pm PDT The couple recently sold the home to a new family, but you can check out tons of dreamy photos of the Tin Can Homestead on their Instagram page. + Tin Can Homestead Via Apartment Therapy

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This stunning vintage Airstream is a Scandinavian design dream come true

Korean barista creates incredible works of latte art

June 1, 2017 by  
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Latte art is nothing new; your favorite barista at the local coffee shop probably serves up drinks adorned with hearts or flowers. But Korean barista Kangbin Lee’s latte art, which he calls creamart, will totally blow your mind. From Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night to Disney-inspired pieces, these pieces of art look far too beautiful to drink. Lee, owner of Cafe C.Through in South Korea, has been a barista for 10 years. He says he’s never had any training in drawing, but that didn’t stop him from creating stunning latte art. You might be suspicious there was some Photoshop involved, but Lee demonstrates how he creates his art in the video below. Related: Artist paints stunning leaf art from leftover coffee grinds and stains Lee actually paints the colors on with a small spoon, using the foam as a backdrop and a color in many pieces. A metal stir stick allows him to add smaller details or blend colors. My Modern Met noted the process is remarkably similar to conventional painting . In another method of his latte art, Lee adds the pigments to the foam first before pouring it out over a cup of coffee to create colorful swirling shapes. #Rainbowlatteart . . . . . . . . #??? #cthrough #????? #?????? #???? #?????? #?????? #??? #????? #??? #????? #????? #???? #???? #????? #latteartporn #dailyart #coffee #barista #baristalife #latte #latteart #baristadaily #cafelatte #coffeetime #creamart #espresso #artwork A post shared by ??? (@leekangbin91) on May 18, 2017 at 4:48pm PDT In an Instagram post Lee said creamart is cold coffee, but that the taste doesn’t change as time passes. He’s as serious about coffee as he is about art and said taste is important to him. According to UPROXX , the artist uses espresso, chocolate sauce, and food coloring to create the works of art – so they’re entirely edible. He said customers always say they’ll never be able to drink the works of art but eventually doing just that. Lee is working to share his art with the world and has also started giving classes in creamart. + Kangbin Lee Via My Modern Met Images via leekangbin91 on Instagram

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Nonprofit teaches communities how to build homes out of straw, clay and soil

May 31, 2017 by  
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Emily Niehaus was working as a loan officer when she see realized that there was a need for affordable, sustainable housing options in her community. So she founded Community Rebuilds – a nonprofit that teaches people to build affordable homes out of “dirt cheap” materials like clay , straw and soil . Interns participate in a 5-month program, completing two homes from foundation to finish using sustainable living principles. Community Rebuilds started in Moab, UT as a way to ease the financial strains of people living in the community. Since then, the project has spread to southwestern Colorado and the Hopi Reservation in Arizona. The initiative has constructed 25 homes in four communities with the goal of expanding knowledge about valuable natural building skills across the US. Homes are built out of natural materials like straw, soil and clay using passive design techniques. They are equipped with green tech like solar arrays and sustainable features like adobe floors, earthen plasters and greywater systems. Related: Navajo mum gets new lease on life with this solar-powered home The first home was built in 2010, and since then the internship has evolved to include 16 people over a five-month term. Interns build two homes from the ground up. In exchange for their labor they get housing, food and an invaluable education in sustainable building. + Community Rebuilds  

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Nonprofit teaches communities how to build homes out of straw, clay and soil

Glowing see-through garden house lets plants soak up the sun

May 31, 2017 by  
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Sometimes less really is more. This beautiful glowing home by H.a Architects was inspired by just one thing – lush greenery. Located in Ho Chi Minh City , the Less Home is clad in perforated white metal that lets in optimal natural light for the abundant vegetation that weaves throughout the interior. The home’s two-story tower design had to be strategic to make the most out of the small plot of land where the building stands. The compact space, which currently houses a family of seven, led the architects to create a flexible interior layout. Composed of various moveable partition s, the system allows the family to customize different layouts throughout the lifetime of the home. Related: Renovated Vietnamese home ‘sewn’ together with intricate steel threads On the interior, the design is minimalist in terms of furniture and decoration, instead using lush vegetation as the foremost design feature. Inspired by the surrounding tropical environment, the designers wanted to pull the exterior inside as much as possible. As a result, various trees and garden pockets are distributed throughout the home, creating a healthy, vibrant greenhouse feel. The home’s perforated white cladding helps feed the vegetation, which in return, provides clean breathing environment for the family, something especially important in a city known for its urban pollution . Via Archdaily Photography by Quang Dam  

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Glowing see-through garden house lets plants soak up the sun

Solar-powered Villa Schoorl blends into Hollands polder landscape

May 31, 2017 by  
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Natural materials and sustainable principles led the design of Villa Schoorl, a contemporary home nestled in the green polders near the North Holland dunes. Surrounded by mills and farmhouses, the contemporary villa references the local rural vernacular with its vertical timber cladding but distinguishes itself using an eyecatching sawtooth roof. Designed by Paul de Ruiter Architects , the energy-efficient dwelling is predominately powered by rooftop solar panels. The Villa Schoorl was mostly built with natural materials to blend the building into the landscape as much as possible. “It was essential to design a villa which in its appearance and its materials is in sync with this context,” said the firm, which clad the home in untreated timber to match the nearby forests. The majority of the villa is tucked underground to further minimize its visual effect on the landscape. Despite its partially subterranean design, Villa Schoorl is flooded with natural light thanks to floor-to-ceiling glazing, skylights, and a central glass atrium . Bedrooms, a hobby room, yoga room, and bathroom are located underground. An open-plan living area, dining room, and kitchen are placed aboveground and surrounded by sliding glass doors that can be shielded with vertical folding elements for privacy and solar shading. Homeowners also have access to a covered terrace on the south end. Related: Solar-powered luxury villa is an energy-neutral gem set in a Dutch dune landscape Rooftop solar panels are mounted on the southernmost part of the sloped roof and the renewable energy harnessed provide a major part of the home’s energy supply. A wood stove connected to central heating helps to heat the home efficiently in winter. + Paul de Ruiter Architects Images by Tim Van de Velde

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Solar-powered Villa Schoorl blends into Hollands polder landscape

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