New Santa Monica City Services Building will produce more energy than it uses

March 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The City of Santa Monica will soon welcome a new civic building that will not only bring the various municipal departments scattered throughout the city under one roof but will also fulfill the Living Building Challenge — making it the largest civic building of its kind to meet the world’s most rigorous and comprehensive green building standards. Designed by Frederick Fisher and Partners , the building will be a model for self-sufficiency and ecological resilience by producing more energy than it uses. Scheduled to open to the public in April 2020, the 50,200-square-foot Santa Monica Services Building was designed to surpass “even the highest LEED certification requirements,” according to its press release. To meet those ambitious standards, the civic building follows passive solar principles and is equipped with numerous energy-saving and -producing systems, such as a series of photovoltaic arrays throughout the structure that total nearly 15,000 square feet, composting facilities and a rainwater recycling system. The building is the first structure in California to be granted the rights to convert rain to potable water onsite. Related: The net-zero Frick Environmental Center is officially one of the world’s greenest buildings The glass that surrounds the building aids in natural daylighting while also symbolizing its civic commitment toward government transparency. Its simple, rectilinear form also complements the original Art Deco design of the historic Santa Monica City Hall, which is connected to the new building via a courtyard. In addition to serving as a landmark structure for environmental sustainability, the Santa Monica City Services Building also champions financial sustainability. The building, which is planned to have a 100-year lifespan, is expected to cost less than the projected cost of the private commercial lease agreements that had previously housed the disjointed city agencies around Santa Monica within 30 years. The building was created in collaboration with BuroHappold Engineering and general contractor Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction Company. + Frederick Fisher and Partners Photography by Takashige Ikawa, renderings by Frederick Fisher and Partners

Go here to see the original:
New Santa Monica City Services Building will produce more energy than it uses

WOHA to transform polluted swamp into green university

March 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

For nearly 50 years, Bangladesh-based nonprofit  BRAC  has championed change for good, and now the NGO will take its do-gooding a big step forward with the establishment of BRAC University in Dhaka. Designed by Singaporean architecture firm  WOHA , the university will be a beacon of environmental and social sustainability as well as a catalyst for positive change in the local community. Slated for completion in 2021, the development will accommodate over 10,000 students on a site that has been remediated from polluted swampland.  In addition to serving as a place of learning, BRAC University will become a showcase of sustainable low-tech solutions for mitigating Bangladesh’s intense summers and heavy monsoons. Key to the design will be the abundance of greenery that blankets the building, which translates to over 26,000 square meters of landscaping that grows both vertically and horizontally to help cut out glare and dust and promote natural cooling to reduce dependence on air conditioning. The architects will also remediate the swamp grounds into a bio-retention pond filled with lush native landscaping that will further enhance a comfortably cool microclimate through evaporate cooling.  Due to Dhaka’s density, the roughly 88,000-square-meter university will rise to a total of 13 stories. Rooms will be based on nine-by-nine-meter structural  modules  to ensure flexibility so that classrooms can combine to former larger units or be subdivided as needed. A “single-room-thick design” also gives every classroom easy access to cross ventilation and daylighting. Gathering spaces will be open and airy yet sheltered from the elements.  Related: WOHA revamps Singapore office with lush ‘pocket parks’ A large recreational sky park known as the “University Green” will crown the roof of the university and comprise a recreational field, a swimming pool and a 200-meter running track beneath a large photovoltaic canopy. Harvested  solar  energy will be used to power giant High Volume Low Speed (HVLS) fans, common area lights and student laptops.  + WOHA Images via WOHA

Original post:
WOHA to transform polluted swamp into green university

Northern Chinas largest bamboo pavilion covers nearly half an acre

March 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

After years of building bamboo houses across rural China, Italian architect Mauricio Cardenas Laverde completed his largest bamboo project yet — the Bamboo Eye pavilion, a 1,600-square-meter structure constructed entirely from 5,000 locally sourced moso bamboo poles. Completed last April for the 2019 International Horticultural Exhibition in Beijing, the new pavilion is the largest of its kind ever built in northern China, according to the International Bamboo and Rattan Organization (INBAR) . The massive pavilion was created to house programmatic activity while showcasing the architectural possibilities of bamboo in modern, low-carbon construction. Created to follow the INBAR Garden’s theme of “Bamboo and Rattan for Green Growth,” the Bamboo Eye Pavilion shows off the tensile strength of bamboo, which is greater than that of mild steel. China, which is home to over 6 million hectares of bamboo, has used bamboo for construction for thousands of years. Modern construction in the country, however, mainly depends on steel and concrete. In an effort to promote the use of bamboo for sustainable development, INBAR teamed up with Laverde to show how bamboo could replace steel and wood and thus reduce pressures on forest resources. Related: Turtle-inspired bamboo shelter contracts to half its size in case of extreme weather “We have to change the way we think about construction,” Laverde said. “If we used natural building materials in cities and changed our mindset, then it would be easy to rebuild every few decades without the huge cost of today.” The organic form of the Bamboo Eye pavilion is achieved with bamboo arches, which span 32 meters in length and 9 meters in height. The arches were bent and formed by fire baking, a process that turns the bamboo to a golden yellow and expands the material’s lifespan to 30 years. Lightweight yet strong, the truss arch structure is also sturdy enough to bear the weight of a green roof , which helps blend the building in with the nearby bamboo forest. The self-ventilating interior houses an auditorium and exhibition area. The Bamboo Pavilion was built for the International Horticultural Exhibition that was held from April to October 2019.  + Mauricio Cardenas Laverde Images via INBAR

View post: 
Northern Chinas largest bamboo pavilion covers nearly half an acre

LEED Platinum high-rise in Toronto promotes sustainable living

March 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on LEED Platinum high-rise in Toronto promotes sustainable living

Aqualina at Bayside, a new multistory residence in Toronto, has just earned LEED Platinum certification — a first for a high-rise condo in Toronto and the second designation for a building of its kind in all of Canada. Developed by Hines Canada and Tridel, Aqualina was created as part of an ongoing effort to revitalize the city’s waterfront with sustainable design. As the flagship condominium residence in the masterplanned Bayside Toronto Community, Aqualina is the first of four residential projects onsite and was completed in 2019. Designed as an example for sustainable residential living across Canada , Aqualina incorporates a range of energy-saving systems that result in energy efficiencies of 45% compared to the model national energy code. Energy-saving technologies include high-efficiency lighting throughout as well as a rooftop photovoltaic array that produces up to 30 kW of electricity and doubles as a shade structure for an outdoor barbecue area for residents. Aqualina also includes a NetZED suite specially engineered to produce as much electricity as it consumes. Related: Canada’s first net-zero carbon, mass-timber college building to rise in Toronto Most importantly, the building design encourages sustainable lifestyles. Aqualina is accessible by all forms of transportation and is connected to the Bayside Village community through an interactive laneway. A community garden located on the sixth-floor terrace offers residents the opportunity to grow their own produce while interacting with their neighbors. The surrounding community has also benefited from the construction, which emphasized local job generation and local material sourcing. In contrast to the site’s post-industrial origins, the redeveloped site makes human health a priority. In addition to the remediation of contaminated soils, the building is outfitted with low-VOC materials and finishes while the majority of waste materials were diverted from landfills and recycled wherever possible. Fresh air is continuously brought into the building through a high-efficiency Energy Recovery Ventilator. + Aqualina Images via Aqualina

Original post: 
LEED Platinum high-rise in Toronto promotes sustainable living

Green-roofed Stonecrop home rises from rural English landscape

March 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Green-roofed Stonecrop home rises from rural English landscape

London-based architecture firm  Featherstone Young  recently completed Stonecrop, a new home in Rutland, East Midlands that’s also an example of how thoughtful architecture can draw new interest to declining rural communities. Topped with a sloping green roof that touches the ground, the sculptural building features two wings — one that houses the main living areas and the other for guest quarters — that wrap around a central courtyard. To reduce the home’s environmental footprint , the architects used locally sourced Clipsham limestone and oriented the home according to passive solar principles.  When the architects were asked by their clients to design a home on the edge of a village designated as a conservation area, they were initially met with pushback from the local planning authority. In response, the firm created a successful two-stage planning approach that not only detailed designs for a 347-square-meter sustainable home, but also showed how sensitive new construction could protect and enhance the surrounding countryside by preventing linear sprawl.  “Releasing overlooked sites such as these helps keep villages compact and distinct, and kicks against the usual housing development we see sprawling into the countryside,” explained Sarah Featherstone, architect and co-director of Featherstone Young. “This, coupled with the house’s two-wing strategy, makes for a more sustainable approach to building in  rural settings .” Related: Contemporary barn-inspired home adheres to passive house principles Stonecrop’s two-wing design also helps clients save on energy costs. When the secondary wing for guests is not in use, the clients can choose to only heat the main wing for day-to-day living. The principal wing is defined by its “buffer” wall of textured dry stone that provides privacy and thermal mass. In contrast, the three-bedroom guest wing, which is also constructed from the same locally sourced Clipsham  limestone , features a smooth ashlar finish. The two wings wrap around a central courtyard that helps funnel natural light and ventilation indoors. Large glazed walls frame views of the garden and meadow, while a natural material palette further ties the interiors to the outdoors.  + Featherstone Young Images © Brotherton-Lock and © James Brittain

View post:
Green-roofed Stonecrop home rises from rural English landscape

Reima designs a traceable, recyclable jacket for kids

March 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Reima designs a traceable, recyclable jacket for kids

Finnish children’s activewear brand Reima has released its 100% recyclable children’s jacket. The stylish and sustainable outerwear is crafted from recycled polyester and comes with a tracking code for users to follow the product’s journey throughout its recycling and reuse. Even better, when you register to track the jacket, Reima will donate to organizations that help clean toxic blue-green algae from the Baltic Sea. The brand, founded in Finland in 1944, is tailored toward giving children the wearable tools they need to enjoy the great outdoors safely and sustainably. The Voyager joins Reima’s eco-minded collection featuring non-toxic, waterproof finishes and sustainable materials such as recycled polyester from plastic bottles, bamboo viscose and organic cotton . Each jacket comes with a traceable ID, and for each ID that is registered, Reima donates $11 to the Finland’s John Nurminen Foundation. Related: P+365 is turning abandoned festival tents into wearable merchandise “Another child reusing the Voyager jacket will save as much CO2 as it would take to produce a new garment,” said Shahriare Mahmood, R&D and sustainability director at Reima. “The high-quality and classic design of the Voyager jacket ensures it has enough value to be resold and reused by several children. We want to make an ecosystem with a true circular approach and provide the opportunity for our customers to act responsibly. We know that polyester recycling is possible, and by creating a proper ecosystem, we are heading to add even more value through upcycling .” Every part of the Voyager jacket — besides the zipper lock and snaps (which can be recycled as metal) — is made from polyester, a material that can be recycled into polymers to reuse for different products. The jacket’s material dries quickly and can be washed at lower temperatures with less detergent, features that contribute to saving energy and water while using less chemicals. Reima is also introducing a summer collection using SunProof Repreve recycled polyester jersey fabric made from plastic water bottles. The Reima SunProof PES jersey will provide UV 50+ sun protection. + Reima Images via Reima

See the rest here:
Reima designs a traceable, recyclable jacket for kids

BAS breaks ground on energy-efficient Discovery Building to study climate change in Antarctica

February 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on BAS breaks ground on energy-efficient Discovery Building to study climate change in Antarctica

To establish Britain as a world leader in the fight against climate change, the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has broken ground on the new Discovery Building at Rothera Research Station, its largest facility for ongoing climate-related research in Antarctica. Designed by Hugh Broughton Architects (HBA) as part of the Antarctic Infrastructure Modernisation Partnership, the new operations building and ongoing modernization efforts will follow a bespoke BREEAM accreditation and assessment system to ensure that the upgraded facility meets the highest environmental standards. Located on a rocky promontory at the southern extremity of Adelaide Island, the Rothera Research Station has operated year-round since its opening in 1975 and serves as a major logistics center for all BAS operations on the continent. The new cutting-edge facility — named The Discovery Building to commemorate the discovery of Antarctica in 1820 by the British naval officer Edward Bransfield — will consolidate the existing facility by replacing a series of scattered buildings that are too outdated or costly to maintain. Spanning an area of 4,500 square meters, the two-story building will comprise preparation areas for field expeditions, a central store, medical facility, offices, recreational spaces, workshops and areas for plant. Related: Antarctica reaches record high temperature To minimize environmental impact, The Discovery Building will feature an energy-efficient, aerodynamic design oriented into the prevailing wind. A snow and wind deflector — the largest of its kind in Antarctica — will channel air at higher speeds down the leeward face to minimize snow accumulation. The exterior composite insulated metal panels will be tinted a pale blue in reference to the Antarctic sky and to minimize impacts of degradation from high levels of UV. Triple glazing will let in natural light while ensuring an airtight envelope. Health and wellness for field staff is also considered in the design. Vibrant colors, transparent glazed screens between spaces and access to natural light will help mitigate the effects of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) during the long, dark Antarctic winters. Open-plan workspaces and break-out areas will help foster collaboration. The Discovery Building is expected to finish construction in 2023. The project was designed with BAM Nuttall Ltd and its team, design consultants Sweco, Hugh Broughton Architects as well as with Ramboll acting as BAS’s Technical Advisers and with its team Norr and Turner & Townsend. + Hugh Broughton Architects Images via Hugh Broughton Architects

Go here to see the original:
BAS breaks ground on energy-efficient Discovery Building to study climate change in Antarctica

Sculptural, energy-saving office boasts the smartest building advances in Germany

February 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sculptural, energy-saving office boasts the smartest building advances in Germany

In the heart of Berlin, Danish architecture firm 3XN has recently completed Cube Berlin, a striking new office showcasing the latest advances in sustainability, digitization and design. Opened this month, Cube Berlin also serves as a new city landmark with its sculptural, reflective facade designed to engage the pedestrian realm at the historically significant site of Washingtonplatz. The building is expected to achieve DNGB Gold certification and is engineered with smart office technologies that learn and adapt to user behavior to optimize comfort and energy efficiency. Designed as a prismatic reinterpretation of the cube, the sculptural Cube Berlin measures 4.25 meters in all directions. Reflective glazing wraps around the exterior to mirror the surroundings and engage passersby while allowing natural light into the building without compromising privacy. The floor-to-ceiling windows frame stunning views of Berlin landmarks, and select operable openings let in natural ventilation. Solar coatings to the facade, described by the architects as an “osmotic skin,” along with external solar shading mitigate unwanted solar gain and ensure high energy savings. Related: 3XN unveils new, sustainable building for UNSW Sydney In addition to providing visual interest, the reflective prismatic facade also provides opportunities for outdoor terraces on all levels. Outdoor space has also been created on the roof — the “fifth facade” — that features a spacious rooftop terrace shared by office tenants. The office building comprises 10 floors of flexible, multi-tenant office space as well as a ground-floor food market and office lobby, underground parking, plant rooms, conference areas and a rooftop terrace.  As a “next generation smart building,” Cube Berlin allows for greater interactivity between users and the building operations. Building operational information is stored in a “digital brain” server that collects data on energy flow and consumption. Users can use an app to interact with the system by remotely controlling features such as access control, indoor heating and cooling, maintenance, energy supply, room and parking reservations, charging of electric cars and bicycles and more. “In this way, the building and its users enter into an interplay where both are learning from each other,” the architects explained. “The building learns to adjust to the preferences of its users, while the users can control and adapt the building’s settings according to their desires and needs.” + 3XN Photography by Adam Mørk via 3XN

See original here:
Sculptural, energy-saving office boasts the smartest building advances in Germany

First CLT Passive House project in Boston breaks ground

February 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on First CLT Passive House project in Boston breaks ground

Move over steel and concrete — a pioneering cross-laminated timber (CLT) project that’s set to break ground in Boston could spearhead a greater adoption of mass timber across the country. Local startup  Generate Architecture + Technologies  has teamed up with progressive developer Placetailor to lead the project — the city’s first-ever CLT Cellular Passive House Demonstration Project — and provide live/work spaces in Lower Roxbury. Developed with the startup’s Model-C system for prefabricated kit-of-parts construction, the building will forgo conventional concrete and steel materials in favor of carbon-sequestering engineered wood products. Expected to break ground in June of 2020, the CLT Passive House demonstration project will comprise five floors with 14 residential units as well as innovative and affordable co-working spaces for the local community on the ground floor. In addition to introducing low-carbon, mixed-use  programming to the neighborhood, the project will be a working prototype for Generate’s Model-C, “a replicable system for housing delivery methods designed to address climate and community.”  The Model-C system is not only designed to function at net-zero carbon levels, but is also Passive House certified and built to the new Boston Department of Neighborhood Development “Zero Emissions Standards,” which were developed with Placetailor. As a result, the demonstration project is expected to have a significantly reduced carbon footprint as compared to traditional construction. The  CLT  rooftop canopy is also engineered to make it easy to mount solar panels. Modular units, like the bathrooms, can be prefabricated offsite and then plugged into the building to reduce construction time and waste.  Related: This student housing is the largest Passive House-certified building in the Southern Hemisphere Thanks to  prefabrication  methods and the reduction of interior framing, the Model-C prototype is expected to completed by the end of 2020 and will be available for tours at the Industrial Wood-Based Construction (IWBC) conference in Boston on November 4. Generate is also exploring the possibility of applying the Model-C system to projects that range from six to 18 stories across the U.S. + Generate Images by Forbes Massie Studio

Here is the original post: 
First CLT Passive House project in Boston breaks ground

This dynamic parking garage doubles as a public sculpture

January 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This dynamic parking garage doubles as a public sculpture

In Denmark’s fourth-largest city of Aalborg, Copenhagen-based architecture firm Sangberg has designed a deceptively simple parking garage that offers much more than parking spaces. Dubbed the Parking House G2, the monolithic building features a dynamic and lightweight facade of extruded aluminum slats that “animates itself” in different ways depending on how and from where it’s viewed. The aluminum slats of the playful graphic facade were also engineered with reusability in mind and to encourage the growth of habitat for birds and insects.  Located in a part of Aalborg that’s currently being transformed from an industrial harbor to a new multi-use neighborhood, the Parking House G2 references the industrial heritage of its surroundings with its monolithic aluminum construction, while injecting new life with its sculptural appearance. “Whether you’re driving by in a car or you’re passing by as a pedestrian, your experience will differ as the facade animates itself in accordance to the speed travelled,” the architects said on the Sangberg blog . “The expression also changes whether it is viewed nearby or far away, from straight on or from the side – and with the light conditions and seasons.” The building’s facade gets its dynamic characteristics from the subtle variations in the profiles of the light gray aluminum slats that surround the concrete frame like a piece of cloth. In addition to creating a textural expression, the angled slats are spaced apart to let natural light and ventilation into the building. The facade also provides opportunities for greenery to take hold, a feature that was inspired by the master plan for the area that includes a green buffer zone along Nyhavnsgade, a major thoroughfare near the harbor. Related: Denmark’s first timber parking garage will be enveloped in greenery Completed over two years, the 15,200-square-meter building includes 590 parking spaces. The aluminum facade can be easily disassembled and recycled for use in other building projects. Its compact build, sustainable design, and its playful facade earned the project an Aalborg Municipality building award.  + Sangberg Images by Ramus Hjortshøj – COAST Studio

Go here to read the rest:
This dynamic parking garage doubles as a public sculpture

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1705 access attempts in the last 7 days.