Could the U.S. benefit from a national green bank?

July 27, 2017 by  
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Third time’s the charm for the Green Bank Act of 2017.

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Could the U.S. benefit from a national green bank?

How chickens are powering the circular economy

July 27, 2017 by  
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Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to the renewable energy plant that’s turning its waste into electricity. Sponsored

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How chickens are powering the circular economy

Episode 76: Energy productivity and green banks gain traction

May 19, 2017 by  
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On this week’s podcast: Navigating renewables in the age of Trump, green banks fill the void, and EP100 turns one year old.

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Episode 76: Energy productivity and green banks gain traction

Filling the gap: Why demand for green banks is growing

May 15, 2017 by  
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Organizations such as NY Green Bank offer new ways to finance renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. But concern lingers over how the Trump administration will impact demand.

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Filling the gap: Why demand for green banks is growing

Heres every bank funding the Dakota Access Pipeline, and how to switch

December 6, 2016 by  
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People around the world are celebrating the U.S. Army Corps’ decision to block the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, but that doesn’t mean the project is not forging forward in other areas. Locals at Standing Rock fear that this move is just a foil and a way to avoid protesters at the build site. Although many of us can’t join in the fight for tribal rights and clean water, we can make a powerful statement – by switching financial institutions away from banks funding the 1,172-mile-long underground pipeline set to transport crude oil across four states from the Bakken oil fields of North Dakota to an oil tank farm near Patoka, Illinois. Norway’s biggest bank, DNB, recently announced that it had sold its assets in the Dakota Access Pipeline and that it is reconsidering its loan, accounting for 10 percent of the total funding for the project. There are 17 banks directly funding the pipeline project, according to Food & Water Watch. They are: Wells Fargo BNP Paribas SunTrust The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ Mizuho Bank Citibank (CitiGroup) TD Securities Credit Agricole Intesa SanPaolo ING Bank Natixis BayernLB BBVA Securities DBN Capital ICBC London SMBC Nikko Securities Societe General Related: Sign this petition to stop construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline Switching banks is not just a form of protest at this point. While a long shot, a massive movement of money out of the project’s primary lenders could convince these banks to back out. The financial institutions are holding on to the remaining $1.4 billion that is needed to complete the pipeline, pending approval of final permits by the Army Corps of Engineers. After closing your account, you will of course want to open an account at a bank that isn’t financing environmental destruction and the trampling of Indigenous rights. Options include banks that fund renewable energy projects, community banks and credit unions. Related: 8 ways to help the water protectors at the Standing Rock Reservation Banks supporting renewable energy Since the Connecticut Green Bank was founded in 2011 as the first green bank in the United States, green banks have expanded to New York, California and other states. Green banks are great tools for accelerating financing of clean energy projects by using public funds to leverage private capital investment. While green banks should be encouraged at every level of government, you will need a checking account from a commercial bank that invests in clean energy after switching out of one of the 17 banks financing DAPL. A 2014 Bloomberg Markets’ ranking of the world’s greenest banks includes Royal Bank of Canada, Goldman Sachs, Spain’s Banco Santander SA, UniCredit SpA of Italy, HSBC Holdings Plc of the UK, SEB AB of Sweden, Credit Suisse Group AG of Switzerland and JPMorgan Chase. However, it is important to keep in mind that in addition to renewables many of these financial institutions also invest in dirty energy projects. Community banks After big banks brought the economy to its knees during the 2008 Wall Street crash, many Americans rediscovered independent, locally owned and operated financial institutions, otherwise known as community banks . These old-fashioned neighborhood banks are a great way to go. Instead of investing in megaprojects like DAPL, community banks typically finance local projects that benefit the community they are located in. Credit Unions Switching to a credit union is another option. Credit unions are democratically controlled by members, not shareholders. They are not-for-profit institutions funded mostly by voluntary member deposits. Credit unions can also finance community and residential renewable energy projects such as solar PV, solar hot water, geothermal energy and energy efficiency sealing and insulation. Images via Sacred Stone Camp and Rob Wilson , Wikimedia Commons , Duncan Smith/Corbis , and The Street

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Heres every bank funding the Dakota Access Pipeline, and how to switch

Episode 47: Blockchain, green banks and beyond

October 7, 2016 by  
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This week on the GreenBiz 350 podcast: What blockchain has to do with sustainability, the rise of green banks and what’s next for the Internet of Things.

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Episode 47: Blockchain, green banks and beyond

What does the green bank landscape look like?

October 4, 2016 by  
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Are green banks actually successful in providing financing to customers for clean energy projects? A new report by the ACEEE suggests that it’s hard to say.

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What does the green bank landscape look like?

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