New Feyenoord sports center has a perforated facade made from weathered steel

June 1, 2017 by  
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A perforated weathered steel envelope shelters the interior of the new Feynoord Training Complex in Rotterdam , providing privacy and daylight for players and staff. Moederscheim Moonen Architects designed the complex as a new landmark for the city which will house various medical and wellness facilities, changing rooms for players, hospitality spaces and an auditorium. Offering facilities in line with the needs of a modern football club, the Feynoord Training Complex will be realized in a sub-area of the new Stadionpark district in Rotterdam as part of a larger masterplan . The building opens up towards two football pitches, while its rear facade “turns its back” to the public road. This provides privacy while enabling as much transparency and interaction as possible between the fields and the building. Related: Zigzagging Het Anker community center in the Netherlands is partially buried underground A sharply delineated facade doubles as a pronounced roof overhang . This element is made up of trapezium-shaped, expanded weathering steel panels with varying degrees of perforation . A red hue referencing the club’s distinctive colors reinforces the unique Feyenoord atmosphere. + Moederscheim Moonen Architects

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New Feyenoord sports center has a perforated facade made from weathered steel

Ecosistema Urbano envisions bioclimatic domes for Florida’s West Palm waterfront

May 29, 2017 by  
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This green masterplan for the West Palm Beach in Florida will include the first public bioclimatic domes in the U.S. adorned with hanging gardens. Architecture film Ecosistema Urbano submitted this proposal to the Shore to Core competition, which invited international designers, planners and architects to envision the future of the West Palm Beach waterfront. Van Alen Institute and the West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency (WPB CRA) awarded their Open Shore project first prize, out of a pool of over 40 international teams. The proposal envisions new amenities that reflect the city’s social and ethnic complexity. The design also shows how the city’s Banyan Garage can be upcycled into a mixed-use building that includes a farmers market, co-working spaces and skyline viewing platforms. Thematic alleyways feature rock climbing walls, interactive exhibition spaces and lots of foliage. Bioclimatic domes, the first public ones in the U.S., will be adorned with handing gardens , creating climatically comfortable spaces year round. Related: SOM Unveils Miami Multimodal Hub for All Aboard Florida’s New Rail Network “Ecosistema Urbano’s proposal addresses social cohesion in a compelling way by integrating locally responsive systems with a welcoming public space that will further diversify the city,” said David van der Leer, Executive Director of Van Alen Institute. “We’re thrilled that West Palm Beach is looking to the future and rethinking how to create a downtown that is uniquely theirs— a downtown that enhances the wellbeing of residents and visitors alike.” + Ecosistema Urbano + Van Alen Institute + West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency (WPB CRA)

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Ecosistema Urbano envisions bioclimatic domes for Florida’s West Palm waterfront

Incredible teepee-shaped ORKA house is made from 24 interlacing beams

May 23, 2017 by  
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This   teepee-shaped home is made from twenty four interlacing beams that shelter a large open-plan living space. Antony Gibbon Designs ‘ ORKA house explores different geometric shapes and unconventional forms for residential architecture. The three-story dwelling features a rooftop platform with panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. The house has twenty four wooden beams that coalesce, forming a pivoted illusion which transforms angles into a seemingly curved hyperboloid form. Using the frame as an aesthetic starting point, the architects interlaced the beams to naturally create diamond-shaped patterns. These patterns become part of the geometry and symmetry of the structure. Related: This charred wood cabin can be rearranged in an infinite number of ways The envelope wraps around an area 10 meters in diameter (33 feet), allowing for a large open-plan living space. A spiral staircase connects the ground floor to another three floors, with the top floor doubling as an outdoor viewing platform and balcony offering panoramic views of the surrounding landscape. + Antony Gibbon Designs

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Incredible teepee-shaped ORKA house is made from 24 interlacing beams

Passive solar home built of recycled natural materials "floats in the Australian bush

May 22, 2017 by  
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At first glance, the delightfully sinuous roof that tops the Lauriston house makes the building look more like sculpture than a home in the Australian bush. But a closer look reveals that the building truly is a welcoming retreat meticulously detailed with the luxurious comforts of home and more. Designed by Seeley Architects , the Lauriston house is a beautiful dwelling that embraces the outdoors as well as passive solar principles for an environmentally friendly footprint. Designed for a client who sought intimacy with the outdoors, the 380-square-meter Lauriston house’s rectangular volume is predominately covered in floor-to-ceiling glazing to overlook the landscape of olive groves and gum trees. To protect the glass home from the elements, the architects carefully sited the building and topped it with an undulating roof that protects against rain and sun. The roof’s wavy shape also references the hilly landscape near Kyneton, Victoria. “The geometrically aligned rows of olive trees set against a voluptuous landscape evoke a quiet, unspoken tension,” wrote the architects, referencing the contrast between the indigenous flora and the structured olive groves. “The house mimics this tension with the relationship of a meticulously detailed and structured frame against a seemingly effortless floating, sinuous roof.” The building’s glazed form is given a heightened sense of lightness with its bold cantilever . Related: Solar-powered Bush House exemplifies chic eco-friendly living in the Australian outback Local natural materials and textures give the home a sense of warmth, from the Messmate timber lining to the colonial-inspired French pattern bluestone. The interior is organized around a centrally located alfresco entrance that separates the private areas on the east end from the public spaces to the west. The open-plan living and dining area opens up to the cantilevered deck with stunning landscape views of hills, dams, and olive groves. The home’s integration of passive solar principles and rainwater capture systems ensures a lower energy footprint. + Seeley Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Peter Hyatt

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Passive solar home built of recycled natural materials "floats in the Australian bush

HWKN unveils plans for a green-roofed business district in Munich

May 16, 2017 by  
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New York-based architecture firm Hollwich Kushner just released images of Die Macherei– their first European project– a mixed-use business district based in Munich, Germany. HWKN collaborated with German firms msm meyer schmitz-morkramer and OSA Ochs Schmidhuber Architekten to design the new financial hub that will bring together offices, retail and hospitality spaces. Art-Invest Real Estate and Accumulata Immobilien developed the new business district , which will total 64,000 square meters (15 acres) of rental space. Out of the six new buildings, HWKN designed the hotel and two adjacent office buildings located on the eastern quarter of the site. The hotel will feature an elevated bar with a series of outdoor terraces that offer views of the surrounding mountains. The office building will accommodate a two-story gym, while the third building will guide pedestrians toward the public plaza which will function as the heart of the development. Related: HWKN converts a paint factory into Upenn’s new state-of-the-art innovation hub “Designed not just as a series of buildings but as an exploration of the spaces between the buildings, Die Macherei is an innovative design for a new way of working and interacting, integrating social activity and behaviors to promote a sense of community,” said Matthias Hollwich. + Hollwich Kushner

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London’s Marston Court transforms shipping containers into emergency housing for the homeless

April 26, 2017 by  
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A newly-constructed emergency h ousing development in London’s Ealing borough provides 34 temporary apartments to the needy. CargoTek teamed up with QED Property , ISO Spaces and Ealing Council to build the innovative Marston Court development out of re-purposed shipping containers, using a kit of moveable and re-usable parts for maximum flexibility. The project addresses the issue of homelessness with flexible, temporary and affordable design solutions. Marston Court is located on a disused brownfield site on Bordars Walk in Ealing. The project revitalizes vacant land by providing emergency accommodation to those in need, including young families and low-income individuals. Related: CargoTek taps shipping containers for affordable UK homes and offices The project will house up to 72 people in 34 fully furnished apartments with a management office, laundry and refuse storage. It includes a landscaped outdoor area with a playground. ISO Spaces manufactured the modular components in their production facility in Cornwall. The company’s founder Gregg Curtis said: “Homelessness is an issue that is always critical at any scale, We need to design and develop more solutions to these issues. Our focus is on providing real products to do that. And working in partnerships with organizations that can deploy those solutions at scale is critical.” + CargoTek + ISO Spaces + QED Property

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London’s Marston Court transforms shipping containers into emergency housing for the homeless

Green-roofed wooden tower in Lagos maximizes daylight and natural ventilation

April 17, 2017 by  
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This green-roofed wooden tower planned for Lagos features a perforated envelope inspired by indigenous cultures of the area. Hermann Kamte & Associates designed the experimental structure as an alternative to the massive concrete buildings that dominate the city. By contrast, the wooden tower emphasizes passive design principles that marry indoor and outdoor living. The building was designed for the Plan B: City Above the City competition. Each floor provides a variety of residential units surrounded by a belt of lush greenery. Divided into 4 parts, the new building sits atop an existing housing estate, with sky gardens and other amenities separating the old and the new. A rooftop garden provides panoramic views of the city and functions as an informal gathering space and restaurant. Related: Shanty Megastructures envisions a colossal vertical slum in the heart of Lagos The wooden envelope incorporates traditional patterns from the Yoruba culture, and it provides protection from direct sun while giving the project a unique appearance. The entire structure is designed using LVL timber for both load-bearing and non-load bearing elements. + Hermann Kamte & Associates

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Green-roofed wooden tower in Lagos maximizes daylight and natural ventilation

San Francisco bike shop lets you trade in car for e-bike

April 17, 2017 by  
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A new bike store in the Bay Area of San Francisco has come up with an interesting way to get people to reduce their transportation footprint. Electric bikes make a great alternative for commutes in cities like San Francisco , but many people find the hefty price tag of an e-bike prohibitive. The New Wheel solves that by allowing patrons to trade in their old vehicles for an e-bike – and a healthier lifestyle. San Francisco’s 74 hills don’t make for pleasant bike commutes – unless you’ve got an e-bike to help you. The New Wheel is making it easier for people to obtain e-bikes. Patrons can bring in their old cars, and the bike shop will take notes on the car’s condition and mileage, and send the information to Roadster.com . 48 hours later they make patrons an offer, and will even come pick up the old car and deliver a check. Ideally patrons will spend some of that money on an e-bike at The New Wheel, but aren’t required to do so. Related: Propella’s lightweight electric bike rides like a regular bike Shop co-founder Brett Thurber told Fast Company, “We’ve always been in the business of trying to figure out ways to get people out of cars and onto bikes. With all the traffic and even parking, it’s not convenient anymore, in many instances, to own a car. I think the thing we’re up against is just habit.” The New Wheel has adopted other ideas from the car industry to help people get used to the idea of owning a bike as their main vehicle. They offer financing for e-bikes and allow people to trade in their old e-bikes. They even offer roadside assistance; if bikers get a flat tire The New Wheel will pick them up twice a year and give them a free ride up to 30 miles. + The New Wheel Via Fast Company Images via Pixabay and Tom Lowenthal on Flickr

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Lush gardens hang from dramatic student housing proposed for Birmingham

April 14, 2017 by  
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An oasis-like residence has been envisioned for Birmingham’s growing, multicultural student population. Tapped by Chinese private equity fund PGC-Capital, London practice Architects of Invention created Garden Hill, a stunning proposal for student housing that draws inspiration from the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. Sky gardens and landscaped terraces cover the two staggered 25-storey towers joined together into a dramatic crescent-shaped volume. Proposed for a 7,500-square-meter site in Digbeth, the mixed-use Garden Hill would comprise 500 residential units, measuring between 40 and 75 square meters, as well as large shared facilities for communal living, music recording studios, ground-floor retail, and commercial units available to rent by startups. The building’s terraced configuration would allow all residents to access greenery and gardens hung at every level as well as private and public landscaped terraces. Related: UC San Diego’s Charles David Keeling Apartments Set the Bar for Sustainable Student Housing The architects envision the complex to be built from cross-laminated timber and describe the project as an “exercise in highly sustainable construction.” To reduce Garden Hill’s carbon footprint, the architects propose using electric underfloor heating for space heating, installing solar hot water heaters , and purchasing 100 percent renewable electrical energy from the grid. + Architects of Invention Via ArchDaily Images via Architects of Invention

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Lush gardens hang from dramatic student housing proposed for Birmingham

This futuristic vertical factory feeds off a city’s waste to produce energy

April 13, 2017 by  
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Most factories gobble up natural resources while belching out pollution – but could these mammoth buildings actually benefit the cities of the future? Designers Tianshu Liu and Lingshen Xie just unveiled plans for a cleaner and greener vertical factory that doubles as a self-sustaining ecosystem . The soaring structure consists of alternating layers of industry and nature that support each other to create a sustainable urban environment. The forward-thinking design recently came in second place in the 2017 Evolo Skyscraper Competition . The multi-layered complexes would actively contribute to the environment of megacities, emitting zero CO2 emissions, improving local energy efficiency , and providing a higher quality of life for factory workers. Related: China plans its first “Forest City” to fight air pollution The vertical factory was inspired by the rapidly-growing city of Manila, where urbanization is spawning new industries and more pollution. The Vertical Factory would ensure green growth by transforming the city’s organic waste into water, fertilizer, heat and electricity. Via Evolo

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