Estée Lauder’s sustainability leader on racial justice, ‘sector-agnostic’ solutions

July 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Estée Lauder’s sustainability leader on racial justice, ‘sector-agnostic’ solutions Heather Clancy Mon, 07/27/2020 – 01:30 In the six years since Nancy Mahon assumed responsibility for CSR and sustainability strategy at Estée Lauder Companies — she’s currently senior vice president of corporate citizenship and sustainability — her team has launched a series of new initiatives that are a “first” among her organization’s sector. The list includes the company’s first virtual power purchase agreement for 22 megawatts, a move made in pursuit of its 2020 net-zero carbon emission goal. More recently, it energized on-site two solar arrays — one at its Melville, New York, campus that will produce 1,800 megawatt-hours of power annually, and a smaller one at the Aveda brand’s campus in Minnesota. The New York installation will provide 100 percent of the electricity required by the office operations, while the Minnesota one will contribute up to 50 percent — the remainder of its power will come from utility-sourced wind power.  Moreover, Estée Lauder Companies also has declared its intention to make 75 percent to 100 percent of its packaging recyclable, refillable, reusable or recoverable by 2025 — the strategy will depend on the needs of individual brands. As with many companies heavily dependent on nature for product ingredients, Estée Lauder Companies is developing biodiversity action plans and becoming far more attuned to it role in deforestation, afforestation and reforestions. And befitting its heavily female clientele, the company also funds initiatives focused on raising up girls and women, such as HERProject, a BSR initiative aimed at supporting low-income women in global supply chains. I recently checked in with Mahon, one of this year’s 25 Badass Women in Sustainability , to get an update on how her priorities have shifted in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the corporate awakening about systemic racism. In mid-June, the company issued a series of sweeping new racial equity policies , i including reaching “U.S. population parity” for Black employees at all levels of the company within five years, doubling the amount spent on sourcing ingredients, packaging materials and supplies from Black-owned businesses over the next three years, and committing $10 million over the next three years to support racial and social justice initiatives. “Moving forward, I think where we are energized as a division — it’s become super clear — on how core the work we do is to the business, not only the environmental side, but also the social side,” Mahon told me. Following are excerpts from our conversations, edited for clarity and length. Heather Clancy: How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed the focus of the Estée Lauder sustainability team, if at all?  Nancy Mahon: I think the clear disparate impacts of COVID-19 across countries and communities has really highlighted, and I think really illustrated, the intersection … of gender justice and social injustice, essentially, and racial injustice. I think while before that intersectionality might have been a little obtuse for folks, I think it’s much clearer now that if you come from a community where there’s high rates of pollution, there’s a huge intersection between high rates of pollution, access to healthcare and health outcomes and COVID-19 outcomes. So I think the speed, the velocity and the ferocity of COVID-19 really highlighted that in a way that I think both unearthed that underlying reality and threw a spotlight on it. And also for consumers, [it] really allowed an opportunity to focus on what was most important in their lives around healthcare, around their families, and put an emphasis — really, I would say it hasn’t changed it, but it has really accelerated consumer interest, particularly — on supply chains, which is super interesting …  I think similar to HIV, there is a question of what will we make of this moment and how will we as stewards of funds or stewards of companies or stewards of our families make a difference. Internally, what it’s allowed us to do in a very agile, very energizing way is move very quickly across different functions to stand up programs that we were planning on setting up. For instance, we created an employee relief fund, and we had targeted that we were going to do it basically this fall. When [COVID-19} happened,”‘We thought, you know what? We have to do this right away.” We had incredible partnership from [human resources] and [information technology] and legal, and we started up right away, then globalized it.  We also created a race and social justice fund in a matter of a couple of weeks. In that way, we’ve had opportunities, which hopefully we’ve seized upon. Moving forward, I think where we are energized as a division — it’s become super clear — on how core the work we do is to the business, not only the environmental side, but also the social side. Clancy: In a previous role, you were very closely involved with addressing the AIDS crisis, which is a humanitarian but also an economic crisis as well. How are you layering that perspective into the strategy as you’re mobilizing around COVID-19?  Mahon: If there is a positive to all of this, it’s that in terms of HIV, it took us well over two decades to have a deep discussion around structural racism or classism or the ways in which structures like a criminal justice system or a healthcare system basically disadvantage certain communities. It was always very hard to get at that discussion. It was much easier to fund street outreach or various research pieces or services than it was to really say, “We have to look at the way we act — either as consumers or as companies — and we might need to give something up, in addition to actually giving.” I think what is exciting about this moment — and I think this is the largest civil rights movement clearly in the United States — there are similarities certainly to what I think the LGBTQ movement experienced around HIV. That was much more, I would say, expanded over time, but I think the discussions are similar. What I think also then is a big emphasis understandably in that movement around action, whether it be FDA approval of drugs or the acceleration of accessibility of healthcare or integration of HIV into other healthcare systems. And we’re seeing that very quickly now, the fact that out of the gate we’re funding a group like Equal Justice Initiative around structural racism and the criminal justice system is exciting.  There has been one difference: The acceleration of funding in the field. I was on a call [recently] and Dan Walker from Ford, who’s so eloquent, basically said that there is roughly a half a billion dollars now in the field of racial and social justice, whereas last year there was only 10 percent of that.  Clancy: Wow.  Mahon: So I think similar to HIV, there is a question of what will we make of this moment and how will we as stewards of funds or stewards of companies or stewards of our families make a difference. How will we change our behavior? I think that’s the exciting moment that we have. The complexity, of course, is that it’s up against enormous economic loss, a lot of fear — which we always had in HIV, but we didn’t have the economic backdrop that we currently have overall to COVID-19. But there’s a lot of great people who are rowing in the same direction now. The question is how do we integrate ourselves? How do we sit in on committees that are focusing on office reopenings or how we’re doing with COVID? How do we integrate social impact and environmental impact into the way we do business every day, and how we as a luxury company kind of show up in our communities? One of our strongest brands, Aveda, is in Blaine, Minneapolis, and we’ve had town halls and will continue to have town halls with our employees there, and how are they engaging, how are they thinking about how they can help? We spent a lot of time thinking about, well, what are virtual volunteering opportunities? What are the ways that we can basically help our employees channel their passion? We decided that we were going to allow, in our year one [of our response], our employees to give away most of the money. We created a five times matching campaign, and the groups we selected were Black Lives Matter, Global Foundation Network, Equal Justice Initiative, Race Forward and NAACP Legal Defense Fund. And we basically said to our employees: Every dollar that you give, we will match it five times. We saw literally over 4,000 employees engage. We had a higher engagement rate than we’ve ever seen. People were posting on their social channels. We’ll be giving away almost $2.3 million through that vehicle. Clancy: Putting the long-term lens on, have there been any adjustments to your long-term corporate sustainability plans in this period? Have your priorities changed?  Mahon: I don’t think they changed. We have been fortunate in that our overall performance over the last I’d say two years in particular has really accelerated. We’re getting recognized by CDP or MSCI or ISS for that, which we find very gratifying. It feels like directionally we’re headed in the right way. And we certainly see in our brands, our consumers and our employees are basically saying, “We want more of this.” While it hasn’t changed the direction, it’s definitely accelerated. For instance, our climate work. We hit net zero early. We’re looking to hit our science-based target early…  We are leaning in on our social impact work, which we’re historically very well-known for. We have integration with social justice. That was an area in our social impact work which we hadn’t done in the past. Many of us had done somewhat similar work. We leaned in and spoke with allies and the Ford Foundation and some of the great foundations that are doing this work. We are looking forward to being part of a broader community and trying to leverage our corporate microphone and our company values to play an even bigger role. So I’d say [we’re moving] faster, perhaps more dimensionalized, and definitely [have a] better understanding not only how do we fund racial and social justice, but how do we as a business take concrete action around hiring and what our creative marketing looks like. So that’s very exciting, because what you don’t want as somebody in my job is to kind of be the nice people that aren’t really integrated into the business.  Clancy: Much of the work on renewable energy has really focused on electricity. Obviously, one of the toughest areas and processes to decarbonize is manufacturing. What solutions are you exploring for your production facilities? Mahon: Waste and water and energy are all linked together. Within each facility, we have an incredible team that’s been focusing on this for quite some time, which is looking at how efficient is our water use? Is there a way to reduce water use? Have we maxed out solar? And are there internal solutions before we move to offsets that we can buy to reduce our energy use? And the answer there is yes. It does vary somewhat by country, and by the state of the green energy and green finance in those countries. Also, as you know, government plays an important role, and of course, being in the U.S., we’ve seen a real rollback in terms of incentivizing green practices … What you don’t want as somebody in my job is to kind of be the nice people that aren’t really integrated into the business. I think the best thing that we can do is help the market grow so there are more alternatives for companies like ours. I think we don’t have to do any convincing at this point. It’s really about the level of sophistication of what we can invest in, and I think also kind of a deeper discussion about offsets, the quality of offsets, and where do offsets get us.  Clancy: Can you share your vision for sustainable packaging? How do things like reuse or refillable containers fit into that?  Mahon : What we’re trying to do, really, is to give the brand presence the most flexibility they can to get to sustainable packaging, and while at the same time reducing plastics and reducing carbon footprint. And that’s kind of a juggling act, frankly, because in many instances it involves added cost. We have a five-year glide path for every single brand. The ability to shift from plastic to glass is easier in skincare. Makeup innovation and sustainable packaging is a new frontier, and we’re really active in that. As you likely know, the size of makeup packaging, particularly samples, is too small — it falls through the filters in the MRFs — so it’s one of the areas that we’re really focusing on now, and really inviting innovation.  Clancy: You’re very excited about forestry and forest options as a means of carbon removal. Are there any particular things you’re looking at that you can mention? Can you elaborate?  Mahon: There’s been some companies that have basically supported, through grant funds, the creation and preservation of forests. And so we are looking at that. More directly, though, we would love to have direct investment in forestry as part of our climate portfolio, and an ability to create green energy. It gets somewhat complex, but obviously, we’re a beauty company, and we don’t want to be in the business of running forests … Those are the discussions that we’re having now, and we’ve been looking at various things over the last couple of years. We don’t have anything specific. We’re basically in due diligence phase on a couple of things. But because this moves so quickly, it doesn’t really make any sense to name names. But we would love, as a result of the article, to certainly invite both other companies who are looking at this [to talk about this and also have] a larger discussion about private/public partnerships around encouraging investment in forest preservation. We recently published a no deforestation policy, as many companies have, so there’s a nice intersectionality there between no deforestation and improving our climate component.  Clancy: I have two more questions. One is just a thread I hear often. What role will collaboration play in Estée Lauder’s strategy? What sorts of partnerships are you prioritizing?  Mahon: One of the exciting aspects of our company and our board … is we have folks who’ve worked in all different sectors. We have a lot of folks who’ve worked in government, like myself. We’ve worked in nonprofits. We’ve worked in for profits. So really, in order to move the ball down the field in a meaningful way, whether in social impact form or another form of impact, we have to basically look at this in a sector-agnostic way in which we really have company discussions about what we’re doing in climate.  What does government bring to the table? OK, there’s tax incentives. They can give various breaks in various laws, regulatory, both the carrot and the stick. What does business bring? Well, business brings enormous amounts of business discipline of understanding markets, understanding consumer needs, understanding how to scale a solution, understanding how to, candidly, abandon a solution if it’s not selling. And then NGOs clearly bring a lot to the table in terms of advocacy.  I think that as we’ve moved so rapidly in the for-profit sector being in favor of green energy and of strong climate solutions, the role I believe of NGOs will be more to be a bridge between government and I would say also private foundations [to come up with solutions]. For instance, in our VPPA, we will have excess green energy. Do we want to be in a position as a beauty company of selling energy, green energy? Or would we rather donate it? We’re having some conversations with the Rockefeller Foundation about, “Well, could we figure out a way where we could just donate it?” That’s where I think we really do need these cross-sector solutions.  Clancy: My last question is what do you feel is your most important priority as a chief sustainability officer in this moment? Mahon: At the end of the day, the great pleasure and complexity and entrepreneurism of CSO jobs is that we don’t own the P&Ls generally of the issues we need to influence. So, I would say the biggest priority really is continuing to listen to our key stakeholders with empathy, and be as responsive as we can, to try to run alongside the train of the business … A lot of what we do is obviously bring a substantive area of expertise, but also integrate as best as we can empathically to the business, and to drive value. At the end of the day, if we drive value for communities and our shareholders and our consumers, then we drive value for the business, and that is I think the great challenge … How do you sit at the table as a business person and understand and have empathy for the great demands being placed for instance on our retail team, and at the same time build climate solutions that help those retail teams, and don’t seem sort of pie in the sky and divorced from the rest of the business? Ultimately, how do we leverage the passions and the interests of our employees and our consumers and now our investors, which is great. Because I think that kind of creates an unlimited path.  Pull Quote I think similar to HIV, there is a question of what will we make of this moment and how will we as stewards of funds or stewards of companies or stewards of our families make a difference. What you don’t want as somebody in my job is to kind of be the nice people that aren’t really integrated into the business. Topics Corporate Strategy Social Justice Corporate Social Responsibility Racial Justice Forestry Deforestation Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Estée Lauder’s sustainability leader on racial justice, ‘sector-agnostic’ solutions

The Estée Lauder Companies’ sustainability leader on racial justice, ‘sector-agnostic’ solutions

July 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

The Estée Lauder Companies’ sustainability leader on racial justice, ‘sector-agnostic’ solutions Heather Clancy Mon, 07/27/2020 – 01:30 In the four years since Nancy Mahon assumed responsibility for CSR and sustainability strategy at The Estée Lauder Companies — she’s currently senior vice president of corporate citizenship and sustainability — her team has launched a series of new initiatives that are a “first” among her organization’s sector. The list includes the company’s first virtual power purchase agreement for 22 megawatts, a move made in pursuit of its 2020 net-zero carbon emission goal. More recently, it energized on-site two solar arrays — one at its Melville, New York, campus that will produce 1,800 megawatt-hours of power annually, and a smaller one at the Aveda brand’s campus in Minnesota. The New York installation will provide 100 percent of the electricity required for its Joseph H. Lauder office facility, while the Minnesota one will contribute up to 50 percent — the remainder of its power will come from utility-sourced wind power.  Moreover, Estée Lauder Companies also has declared its intention to make 75 percent to 100 percent of its packaging recyclable, refillable, reusable, recycled or recoverable by 2025 — the strategy will depend on the needs of individual brands. As with many companies heavily dependent on nature for product ingredients, Estée Lauder Companies is developing biodiversity action plans and becoming far more attuned to its role in deforestation, afforestation and reforestation. And befitting its heavily female clientele, the company also funds initiatives focused on raising up girls and women, such as HERProject, a BSR initiative aimed at supporting low-income women in global supply chains. I recently checked in with Mahon, one of this year’s 25 Badass Women in Sustainability , to get an update on how her priorities have shifted in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the corporate awakening about systemic racism. In mid-June, the company issued a series of sweeping new racial equity policies , including reaching “U.S. population parity” for Black employees at all levels of the company within five years, doubling the amount spent on sourcing ingredients, packaging materials and supplies from Black-owned businesses over the next three years, and committing $10 million over the next three years to support racial and social justice initiatives. “Moving forward, I think where we are energized as a division — it’s become super clear — [is] on how core the work we do is to the business, not only the environmental side, but also the social side,” Mahon told me. Following are excerpts from our conversations, edited for clarity and length. Heather Clancy: How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed the focus of the Estée Lauder sustainability team, if at all?  Nancy Mahon:  The clear disparate impacts of COVID-19 across countries and communities has really highlighted, and I think really illustrated, the intersection … of gender justice and social injustice, essentially, and racial injustice. While before that intersectionality might have been a little obtuse for folks, it’s much clearer now that if you come from a community where there’s high rates of pollution, there’s a huge intersection between high rates of pollution, access to healthcare and health outcomes and COVID-19 outcomes. The speed, the velocity and the ferocity of COVID-19 really highlighted that in a way that both unearthed that underlying reality and threw a spotlight on it. And also for consumers, [it] really allowed an opportunity to focus on what was most important in their lives around healthcare, around their families, and put an emphasis — really, I would say it hasn’t changed it, but it has really accelerated consumer interest, particularly — on supply chains, which is super interesting …  Similar to HIV, there is a question of what [we will] make of this moment and how will we as stewards of funds or stewards of companies or stewards of our families make a difference. Internally, what it’s allowed us to do in a very agile, very energizing way is move very quickly across different functions to stand up programs that we were planning on setting up. For instance, we created an employee relief fund, and we had targeted that we were going to do it basically this fall. When [COVID-19} happened, we thought, “You know what? We have to do this right away.” We had incredible partnership from [human resources] and [information technology] and legal, and we started up right away, then globalized it.  We also created [an accelerated racial and social justice grants campaign] in a matter of a couple of weeks. In that way, we’ve had opportunities, which hopefully we’ve seized upon. Moving forward, I think where we are energized as a division — it’s become super clear — on how core the work we do is to the business, not only the environmental side, but also the social side. Clancy: In a previous role, you were very closely involved with addressing the AIDS crisis, which is a humanitarian but also an economic crisis as well. How are you layering that perspective into the strategy as you’re mobilizing around COVID-19?  Mahon: If there is a positive to all of this, it’s that in terms of HIV, it took us well over two decades to have a deep discussion around structural racism or classism or the ways in which structures like a criminal justice system or a healthcare system basically disadvantage certain communities. It was always very hard to get at that discussion. It was much easier to fund street outreach or various research pieces or services than it was to really say, “We have to look at the way we act — either as consumers or as companies — and we might need to give something up, in addition to actually giving.” …  What also then is a big emphasis, understandably, is the movement around action, whether it be FDA approval of drugs or the acceleration of accessibility of healthcare or integration of HIV into other healthcare systems. And we’re seeing that very quickly now, the fact that out of the gate we’re funding a group like Equal Justice Initiative around structural racism and the criminal justice system is exciting.  There has been one difference: The acceleration of funding in the field. I was on a call [recently] and Darren Walker from Ford Foundation, who’s so eloquent, basically said that there is roughly a half a billion dollars now in the field of racial and social justice, whereas last year there was only 10 percent of that.  Clancy: Wow.  Mahon:  Similar to HIV, there is a question of what [we will] make of this moment and how will we as stewards of funds or stewards of companies or stewards of our families make a difference. How will we change our behavior? The exciting moment that we have. The complexity, of course, is that it’s up against enormous economic loss, a lot of fear — which we always had in HIV, but we didn’t have the economic backdrop that we currently have overall to COVID-19. But there’s a lot of great people who are rowing in the same direction now. The question is how do we integrate ourselves? How do we sit in on committees that are focusing on office reopenings or how we’re doing with COVID? How do we integrate social impact and environmental impact into the way we do business every day, and how we as a luxury company show up in our communities? One of our strongest brands, Aveda, is in Blaine, Minnesota, and we’ve had town halls and will continue to have town halls with our employees there, and how are they engaging … [and] thinking about how they can help? We spent a lot of time thinking about, well, what are virtual volunteering opportunities? What are the ways that we can basically help our employees channel their passion? We decided that we were going to allow, in our year one [of our response], our employees to give away most of the money. We created [an internal] five-times matching campaign, and the groups we selected were Black Lives Matter Global Foundation Network, Equal Justice Initiative, Race Forward, NAACP Legal Defense Fund [and Educational Fund]. And we basically said to our employees: Every dollar that you give, [the company] will match it five times. We saw literally over 4,000 employee [donations]. We had a higher engagement rate than we’ve ever seen. People were posting on their social channels. We’ll be giving away [more than] $2.3 million through [company matches]. Clancy: Putting the long-term lens on, have there been any adjustments to your long-term corporate sustainability plans in this period? Have your priorities changed?  Mahon: I don’t think they changed. We have been fortunate in that our overall performance over the last I’d say two years in particular has really accelerated. We’re getting recognized by CDP or MSCI or ISS for that, which we find very gratifying. It feels like directionally we’re headed in the right way. And we certainly see in our brands, our consumers and our employees are basically saying, “We want more of this.” While it hasn’t changed the direction, it’s definitely accelerated. For instance, our climate work. We hit [RE100] early [in the United States and Canada]. We’re looking to hit our science-based target early…  We are leaning in on our social impact work, which we’re historically very well-known for. We have integration with social justice. That was an area in our social impact work which we hadn’t done in the past. Many of us had done somewhat similar work. We leaned in and spoke with allies and the Ford Foundation and some of the great foundations that are doing this work. We are looking forward to being part of a broader community and trying to leverage our corporate microphone and our company values to play an even bigger role. So I’d say [we’re moving] faster, perhaps more dimensionalized, and definitely [have a] better understanding not only how do we fund racial and social justice, but how do we as a business take concrete action around hiring and what our creative marketing looks like. So that’s very exciting, because what you don’t want as somebody in my job is to kind of be the nice people that aren’t really integrated into the business.  Clancy: Much of the work on renewable energy has really focused on electricity. Obviously, one of the toughest areas and processes to decarbonize is manufacturing. What solutions are you exploring for your production facilities? Mahon: Waste and water and energy are all linked together. Within each facility, we have an incredible team that’s been focusing on this for quite some time, which is looking at how efficient is our water use? Is there a way to reduce water use? Have we maxed out solar? And are there internal solutions before we move to offsets that we can buy to reduce our energy use? And the answer there is yes. It does vary somewhat by country, and by the state of the green energy and green finance in those countries. Also, as you know, the government plays an important role, and of course, being in the U.S., we’ve seen a real rollback in terms of incentivizing green practices … What you don’t want as somebody in my job is to kind of be the nice people that aren’t really integrated into the business. The best thing that we can do is help the market grow so there are more alternatives for companies like ours. We don’t have to do any convincing at this point. It’s really about the level of sophistication of what we can invest in, and also kind of a deeper discussion about offsets, the quality of offsets, and where do offsets get us.  Clancy: Can you share your vision for sustainable packaging? How do things like reuse or refillable containers fit into that?  Mahon : What we’re trying to do, really, is to give the brand [presidents] the most flexibility they can to get to sustainable packaging, and while at the same time reducing plastics and reducing carbon footprint. And that’s kind of a juggling act, frankly, because in many instances it involves added cost. We have a five-year glide path for every single brand. The ability to shift from plastic to glass is easier in skincare. Makeup innovation and sustainable packaging is a new frontier, and we’re really active in that. As you likely know, the size of makeup packaging, particularly samples, is too small — it falls through the filters in the MRFs — so it’s one of the areas that we’re really focusing on now, and really inviting innovation.  Clancy: You’re very excited about forestry and forest options as a means of carbon removal. Are there any particular things you’re looking at that you can mention? Can you elaborate?  Mahon: There’s been some companies that have basically supported, through grant funds, the creation and preservation of forests. And so we are looking at that. More directly, though, we would love to have direct investment in forestry as part of our climate portfolio, and an ability to create green energy. It gets somewhat complex, but obviously, we’re a beauty company, and we don’t want to be in the business of running forests … Those are the discussions that we’re having now, and we’ve been looking at various things over the last couple of years. We don’t have anything specific. We’re basically in the due diligence phase on a couple of things. But because this moves so quickly, it doesn’t really make any sense to name names. But we would love, as a result of the article, to certainly invite both other companies who are looking at this [to talk about this and also have] a larger discussion about private/public partnerships around encouraging investment in forest preservation. We recently published a no deforestation policy, as many companies have, so there’s a nice intersectionality there between no deforestation and improving our climate component.  Clancy: I have two more questions. One is just a thread I hear often. What role will collaboration play in The Estée Lauder Companies’ strategy? What sorts of partnerships are you prioritizing?  Mahon: One of the exciting aspects of our company and our board … is we have folks who’ve worked in all different sectors. We have a lot of folks who’ve worked in government, like myself. We’ve worked in nonprofits. We’ve worked in for profits. So really, in order to move the ball down the field in a meaningful way, whether in social impact form or another form of impact, we have to basically look at this in a sector-agnostic way in which we really have company discussions about what we’re doing in climate.  What does the government bring to the table? OK, there’s tax incentives. They can give various breaks in various laws, regulatory, both the carrot and the stick. What does business bring? Well, business brings enormous amounts of business discipline of understanding markets, understanding consumer needs, understanding how to scale a solution, understanding how to, candidly, abandon a solution if it’s not selling. And then NGOs clearly bring a lot to the table in terms of advocacy.  As we’ve moved so rapidly in the for-profit sector being in favor of green energy and of strong climate solutions, the role I believe of NGOs will be more to be a bridge between government and I would say also private foundations [to come up with solutions]. For instance, in our VPPA, we will have excess green energy. Do we want to be in a position as a beauty company of selling energy, green energy? Or would we rather donate it? We’re having some conversations with the Rockefeller Foundation about, “Well, could we figure out a way where we could just donate it?” That’s where we really do need these cross-sector solutions.  Clancy: My last question is what do you feel is your most important priority as a chief sustainability officer in this moment? Mahon: At the end of the day, the great pleasure and complexity and entrepreneurism of CSO jobs is that we don’t own the P&Ls generally of the issues we need to influence. So, I would say the biggest priority really is continuing to listen to our key stakeholders with empathy, and be as responsive as we can, to try to run alongside the train of the business … A lot of what we do is obviously bring a substantive area of expertise, but also integrate as best as we can empathically to the business, and to drive value. At the end of the day, if we drive value for communities and our shareholders and our consumers, then we drive value for the business, and that is I think the great challenge … How do you sit at the table as a business person and understand and have empathy for the great demands being placed for instance on our retail team, and at the same time build climate solutions that help those retail teams, and don’t seem sort of pie in the sky and divorced from the rest of the business? Ultimately, how do we leverage the passions and the interests of our employees and our consumers and now our investors, which is great. Because that creates an unlimited path.  This article was updated on July 27, 2020, at the request of The Estée Lauder Companies to correct Mahon’s tenure in her current role, and provide more detail about some of the included commitments discussed during the interview. Where changes have been made to her verbatim comments, they are noted with brackets. Pull Quote Similar to HIV, there is a question of what [we will] make of this moment and how will we as stewards of funds or stewards of companies or stewards of our families make a difference. What you don’t want as somebody in my job is to kind of be the nice people that aren’t really integrated into the business. Topics Corporate Strategy Social Justice Corporate Social Responsibility Racial Justice Forestry Deforestation Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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The Estée Lauder Companies’ sustainability leader on racial justice, ‘sector-agnostic’ solutions

50 DIY Natural Handmade Beauty Products That Make Great Gifts

May 4, 2020 by  
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50 DIY Natural Handmade Beauty Products That Make Great Gifts

The Great Global Cleanup — Earth Day 2020

March 25, 2020 by  
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The Great Global Cleanup — Earth Day 2020

Great Barrier Reef outlook decreases from ‘poor’ to ‘very poor’

September 3, 2019 by  
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Conditions at one of the seven natural wonders of the world, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, is declining, and coral bleaching caused by climate change is to blame. The world’s largest coral reef, where 400 types of coral as well as about 10 percent of the world’s fish live, has gone from “poor” to “very poor.” The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) that manages the reef released a five-year study of the reef and stated, “Significant global action to address climate change is critical to slowing the deterioration of the reef’s ecosystem and heritage values and supporting recovery.” Related: University of Queensland wants to drop “bommies” on the Great Barrier Reef Located off the northeastern Australian coast , the reef is a major tourist attraction, bringing in around AU$5-6 billion (about $3.3-4 billion USD) yearly to the country’s economy. But if things don’t improve, the reef might not be around to enjoy for much longer. While coral bleaching and climate change are the main concerns, the report suggested the 1,400-mile reef has “multiple, cumulative and increasing” problems including run-off from agriculture , coastal land clearing and crown-of-thorns starfish that eat the coral. Another possible factor hindering the reef’s growth could be the increased use of coal mining in Australia. Statistics show that Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions have been on an upward climb for four years and counting. As reported by Deutsche Welle , a 2012 study said that since 1985, the Great Barrier Reef has lost more than half its coral cover. Five years later, the journal Nature said 91 percent had been bleached at least once in the last 20 years. Those concerned by the GBRMPA report have gone as far as asking UNESCO to quash the reef’s standing as a World Heritage site, which could humiliate the Australian government. In early 2019, the government did say it would spend AU$380 million to try and reproduce stronger coral. + Great Barrier Reef Via EcoWatch and Deutsche Welle Image via Robert Linsdell

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Great Barrier Reef outlook decreases from ‘poor’ to ‘very poor’

Doctors Prescribe the Great Outdoors

May 2, 2019 by  
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As the wellness movement grows, more and more of us … The post Doctors Prescribe the Great Outdoors appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Doctors Prescribe the Great Outdoors

New study reveals the Great Barrier Reef is struggling to produce new coral

April 5, 2019 by  
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The Great Barrier Reef is struggling to create new coral. Scientists at James Cook University just published a study that shows a shocking decrease in the number of baby coral last year, leading to uncertainty about the future of the reef system. The study revealed that new coral declined by a shocking 89 percent because of large bleaching events in 2016 and 2017 — which were caused by climate change . The last bleaching happened in 2017, and scientists counted how many coral survived the crisis and how many new coral sprung up in 2018. Related: Loophole allows 1M tons of sludge to be dumped on Great Barrier Reef Not only were the numbers extremely low compared to historical counts, but the types of new coral being produced are different as well. According to The Guardian , scientists are worried about the health of the reef, especially if it experiences another bleaching event in the next decade. The reef has survived the previous two bleaching incidents, but a third could do irreparable damage to the world’s largest reef system. “We’ve told the story of coral dying, we’ve told the story of some being winners and losers. Now we’ve got the next phase where species have a chance to recover ,” Terry Hughes, the lead scientist in the study, shared. The Great Barrier Reef would probably recover just fine if it weren’t for the threat of future bleaching. In areas that were hit the hardest in 2016 and 2017, the growth of new coral was slowed to only 2 percent. Those rates have since rebounded to 4 percent, but to fully recover, there would need to be no bleaching events for the next decade. Given that  global warming is not really slowing down, this is highly unlikely. Despite the negative outlook, scientists believe the Great Barrier Reef can still recover. Their biggest concern is that the recovery process will take a lot longer than previously thought. If the reef recovers, there is also worry that it will be unable to sustain those numbers against additional bleaching events. Hopefully, the Great Barrier Reef will not witness any bleaching in the near future, so it can withstand the effects of climate change and fully flourish. Via The Guardian Image via Matt Kieffer

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New study reveals the Great Barrier Reef is struggling to produce new coral

Inspiring zero-energy church in Iowa embraces nature in more ways than one

April 5, 2019 by  
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An inspiring new church in Coralville, Iowa is lifting spirits and bringing people closer to nature — while generating all the energy it needs on site . Iowa City-based firm Neumann Monson Architects designed the church for the Unitarian Universalist Society; the solar-powered building embodies the Society’s core principles with its organic architecture emphasizing sustainability, accessibility and flexibility. The energy-efficient building is currently on track to achieve Zero Energy Building (ZEB) certification from the International Living Future Institute (ILFI). Located on an existing open clearing so as to minimize the building’s impact on the forest, the Unitarian Universalist Society was built to replace an old structure that had multiple levels and many steps. In contrast, the new building was designed for greater accessibility to create more inclusive spaces, and it radiates an uplifting feel with its high ceilings and sloped roof that culminates into a peak in a far corner. The 133,592-square-foot church includes seven religious classrooms and six offices. It was also designed with input from the congregation’s 300 members. Designed for net-zero energy, the church is an all-electric building powered with a geothermal heat pump system and solar photovoltaic panels located on the building’s west side. To further reduce the building’s environmental impact, the architects installed bioretention cells for capturing and filtering all stormwater runoff. The landscaping features native grasses and woodland walking trails that engage the surroundings and are complemented with accessible food gardens. Materials from the property’s existing residence — deconstructed by volunteers — were donated to local nonprofits. Visitors also have access to charging stations. Related: Canada’s largest net-zero energy college building opens in Ontario “The Unitarian Universalist Society facility harmonizes with its natural landscape to provide reflective spaces for worship, fellowship, religious education and administration,” the architects explained. “Beyond fully-glazed walls , the forest provides dappled intimacy. The sanctuary’s prow extends south, a stone’s throw from a mature evergreen grove. Services pause respectfully as deer and woodland creatures pass.” + Neumann Monson Architects Photography by Integrated Studio via Neumann Monson Architects

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Inspiring zero-energy church in Iowa embraces nature in more ways than one

Invest With Your Conscience: 5 Great Socially Responsible Mutual Funds

December 20, 2018 by  
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Many of us are aware that how we spend our … The post Invest With Your Conscience: 5 Great Socially Responsible Mutual Funds appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Invest With Your Conscience: 5 Great Socially Responsible Mutual Funds

Heres your chance to stay at the first Airbnb on the Great Wall of China

August 3, 2018 by  
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If the climbing the Great Wall of China is on your bucket list, here’s your chance to check it off and take part in a one-of-a-kind overnight experience. Airbnb has teamed up with the Beijing Tourism Development Committee to bring the Great Wall onto the hospitality service site as a temporary lodging option. However, making a booking is not as easy as it typically is on AirBnB—hopeful guests will have to enter a contest for a chance to win. Working together with historians and preservations groups based in Beijing , the Airbnb team sensitively transformed a centuries-old Great Wall watchtower into a temporary suite complete with a bedroom, bathroom, dining area and living space. The elevated structure offers 360-degree views of the wall and lush scenery. “Known as one of the greatest architectural feats in human history, the Great Wall was built as a border to protect Chinese states against raids thousands of years ago,” reads a statement from Airbnb. “Today, it is widely considered to be one of the seven wonders of the modern world, bringing visitors from all walks of life together.” This unique Airbnb was created to bring attention to tourism to China by spotlighting its most famous icon and one of the world’s great wonders. Related: The Great Wall of China is slowly disappearing Airbnb will select the four winners (who can bring a guest) from the contest based on their responses to a prompt that asks about boundaries and human connections. During the stay, each winner will have the chance to experience different aspects of Chinese culture, from seal engraving to learning calligraphy. Guests will also have the opportunity to hike the Great Wall and enjoy a multiple-course gourmet dinner accompanied by Chinese music. Winners will be announced after August 11, 2018. + Great Wall of China Airbnb

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