Woman-Powered Ripple Effect Rows the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

June 4, 2018 by  
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In June, the only all-women team in this year’s Great … The post Woman-Powered Ripple Effect Rows the Great Pacific Garbage Patch appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Woman-Powered Ripple Effect Rows the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

The Ocean Cleanup is about to send a giant plastic collector to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

April 20, 2018 by  
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The  Great Pacific Garbage Patch is growing at an alarming rate — and it’s already three times the size of France . Fortunately, help is on the way: new images show that The Ocean Cleanup  is building an innovative  plastic -scooping system in Alameda, CA, and they’re planning to launch it as early as this summer. There are around 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic junk in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and The Ocean Cleanup , started by now-23-year-old Boyan Slat , is much closer to deploying its technology to tackle the dilemma. The group’s  Road to the Cleanup timeline reveals that, earlier this month, the crew finished “the first weld of two floater sections” — the official start of the assembly process. Days later, the organization shared another image of what they called great progress. Related: The Ocean Cleanup launches San Francisco base in Pacific trash-busting bid Fast Company reported  that a massive floating tube, around 2,000 feet long, will serve as a U-shaped barrier to help trap plastic. It’s flexible enough to bend with ocean waves and is made of HDPE plastic — the same material that the system aims to collect, according to ABC7 News . A nylon screen attached to the tube will catch plastic beneath the waves — but not fish, as it isn’t a net. Big anchors, a concept unveiled by Slat in a presentation last year , will essentially tether the system not to the seabed, but to a deep water layer. When might we be able to see the system in action? The Road to the Cleanup timeline estimates launch will happen in the middle of this year. The first piece of the system, which is about as long as a football field, will be towed out into the ocean for tests in a few weeks. The piece will be connected to the larger system following the local tow test, and a final test 200 miles offshore will occur after assembly is finished. It will take three weeks for the system to reach the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and The Ocean Cleanup could get there in August if everything goes as planned. Plastic they gather could be transformed into various  products — clothing, for example — and the Ocean Cleanup could have a shipment of plastic in late fall. + The Ocean Cleanup + Road to the Cleanup Via Fast Company and ABC7 News Images via The Ocean Cleanup

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The Ocean Cleanup is about to send a giant plastic collector to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

A garbage patch bigger than Texas was just discovered in the Pacific Ocean

August 2, 2017 by  
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A few months ago, scientists found a new garbage patch in the Arctic ocean . And now, another pocket of plastics, human trash, and chemical waste has been discovered in a newly-explored region of the Pacific Ocean. Like it’s cousin the “ Great Pacific Garbage Patch ,” it’s an environmental burden that shows just how irresponsible humans have become in recent years. The new patch is located between Hawaii and the mainland US, and it was discovered by the Algalita Research Foundation . Charles Moore led the six-month volunteer voyage. Though researchers are still determining the garbage patch’s size, it is estimated to be as big as a million square kilometers (386,100 square miles) — four times the size of the United Kingdom or 1.5 times the size of Texas ! Moore told ResearchGate : “We discovered tremendous quantities of plastic. My initial impression is that our samples compared to what we were seeing in the North Pacific in 2007, so it’s about ten years behind.” Though the vortex of trash is gargantuan, pictures of the patch are somewhat misleading in terms of the size of debris. Initial analyses reveal that the majority of the plastics are the size of a grain of rice. Of course, there are larger pieces of garbage, such as bottles and fishing nets. So far, it looks as if most of the waste was disposed of by commercial enterprises, such as the fishing industry. This means general consumers are less to blame. “We found a few larger items, occasionally a buoy and some fishing gear, but most of it was broken into bits,” said Moore. Small or large in size, plastic debris still poses a serious threat to marine wildlife and terrestrial ecosystems. It’s estimated that by 2050, 99 percent of birds will have plastic in their guts due to the extraordinary amount of goods disposed of by humans. Though you may think you have nothing to do with the problem, that is unlikely – 80 percent of pollution enters the ocean from land . Over time, plastic debris breaks up into micro-particles that don’t easily biodegrade and are ingested by wildlife. If animals — such as turtles and fish — don’t die from swallowing the trash, their bodies are likely to become more toxic due to the PCBs and other chemicals found in plastics. This, in turn, makes them unsuitable for consumption by humans and other creatures. Related: Shocking study reveals 90% of seabirds have eaten plastic As IFLScience reports, garbage patches in the ocean result from giant systems of circulating currents (gyres) sweeping debris up from ports, harbors, rivers, docks, and ships. The trash then becomes trapped and oftentimes accumulates for years before it is spotted. Though this new vortex of trash is bad news, it doesn’t mean hope is lost. Humans still have time to adopt sustainable habits and prevent climate change from worsening. As innovations are developed to clean up the oceans, individuals and families can reduce their burden on the environment by eating more unpackaged whole, unprocessed foods, bringing recyclable bags to the grocery store and boycotting plastic whenever possible. Via Research Gate Images via Pinterest , Charles Moore, YouTube

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A garbage patch bigger than Texas was just discovered in the Pacific Ocean

Stefano Boeri unveils Amatrice Food Village in town devastated by earthquake

August 2, 2017 by  
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Tourists used to flock in droves to the historic town of Amatrice for its famous pasta and scenery—until a 6.2-magnitude earthquake struck central Italy in August 2016 and reduced it to rubble. One year later, the town finally has reason to rejoice. Stefano Boeri Architects recently completed the Amatrice Food Village, a new facility built entirely of innovative and low-cost timber construction, which marks a post-earthquake turning point as a new tourist attraction and job generator. Built in collaboration with Corriere della Sera and TgLa7, the Amatrice Food Village was completed with pro-earthquake victim funds through the “Un aiuto subito Terremoto Centro Italia 6.0” initiative. Architect Stefano Boeri designed the new Food Village as an innovative 100 percent timber project that was built in record time to help Amatrice bounce back from the earthquake as soon as possible. The Food Village is part of the “Amate Amatrice” project and was presented alongside the “AMA AMATRICE Rose Garden” that symbolizes the rebuilding process. The Amatrice Food Village is a major turning point in the reconstruction process and gives all restaurateurs the opportunity to return to their restaurants for the first time since the earthquake. The facility comprises one coffee bar and seven restaurants outfitted with large windows that overlook the Monti della Laga mountain range. The Food Village will draw tourists from around the world and give jobs to dozens of Amatrice families. Related: Why Italy’s devastating earthquakes could pile up in a ‘domino effect’ “For me, this is a very touching moment,” said Boeri. “I’m happy that the new area has been delivered after so much effort and a never-ending winter that seemed to want to block us in every way! With the struggles of everyone, we were successful in our undertaking and today everything will begin to work again. Amatrice will finally be able to go back to offering its citizens and visitors the area’s food and wine excellences. It is a small though big sign of revival in a place profoundly wounded in its soul and body, a place that all Italians hold dear to their hearts.” The Amatrice Food Village was officially inaugurated on Saturday, July 29, 2017. + Stefano Boeri Architects Images via Stefano Boeri Architects, pre-earthquake photo via Wikimedia

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Stefano Boeri unveils Amatrice Food Village in town devastated by earthquake

The Ocean Cleanup raises $21.7 million to begin ridding the Pacific Ocean of plastic

May 3, 2017 by  
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Last fall The Ocean Cleanup found 1,000 large pieces of plastic in two hours in the Pacific Ocean during their first aerial reconnaissance mission. Today the Dutch foundation announced they’ve raised $21.7 million, and can now begin large-scale trials of their passive plastic capturing technology – in the Pacific – as soon as this year. The Pacific Ocean, plagued by the Texas-sized Great Pacific Garbage Patch , desperately needs to be cleaned up. The Ocean Cleanup is ready to tackle the problem with their plastic gathering technology tested in the North Sea thanks to new funding amounting to $21.7 million. Investors include Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and his wife Lynne Benioff and entrepreneur Peter Thiel . Related: World’s first ocean trash recon mission is complete – and the results are way worse than we thought Founder and CEO Boyan Slat said in a statement, “Our mission is to rid the world’s oceans of plastic, and this support is a major leap forward towards achieving this goal. Thanks to the generous support of these funders, the day we’ll be returning that first batch of plastic to shore is now in sight.” The Ocean Cleanup’s technology draws on ocean currents to collect trash and could reduce the theoretical cleanup time of plastic in the Pacific Ocean from millennia down to years – their Ocean Cleanup Array could scoop up almost half of the patch’s garbage in 10 years . When they launch their technology in the Pacific later this year, it will be the first experimental cleanup system in that ocean, according to the foundation. The Ocean Cleanup will share more details at the Werkspoorkathedraal , an exhibition in the Netherlands, on May 11 at 2:00 PM EST. According to their website the talk will unveil The Next Phase and share “what we’ve been working on for the past two years, and what will be happening next.” They’ll be live streaming the event on their website . + The Ocean Cleanup Images courtesy of The Ocean Cleanup

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The Ocean Cleanup raises $21.7 million to begin ridding the Pacific Ocean of plastic

Seabin Project Aims To Reduce Ocean Pollution

August 4, 2016 by  
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Have you heard of The Great Pacific Garbage Patch? It’s a huge pile of garbage that’s located in the middle of the Pacific Ocean – and it’s larger than the great state of Texas. Sadly, there are millions of tons of garbage that have collected into…

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Seabin Project Aims To Reduce Ocean Pollution

Expedition Finds Permanent Plastic Islands Within the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

July 23, 2014 by  
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Back in 1997 Capt. Charles Moore discovered the Great Pacific Garbage Patch during a sailboat race from Los Angeles to Honolulu. Since then, many have tried to reduce the size of the patch , which is said to be the size of Texas . Unfortunately, Moore recently returned to the area and has discovered that permanent islands of plastic now exist within the patch. Read the rest of Expedition Finds Permanent Plastic Islands Within the Great Pacific Garbage Patch Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Boyan Slat , Captain Charles Moore , great pacific garbage patch , japan tsunami , Ocean Debris , Ocean Plastic , pacific garbage patch , Plastic Islands , plastic waste

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Expedition Finds Permanent Plastic Islands Within the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

VIDEO: How the Oceans Can Clean Themselves of 7.25 Million Tons of Plastic Pollution

June 17, 2014 by  
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Click here to view the embedded video. By now you’ve probably heard about the issue of ocean plastic pollution – but do you know just how pervasive the problem is? Every year we produce 300 million tons of plastic – and there’s currently 7.25 million tons of waste circulating the ocean in massive gyres like the Great Pacific Garbage Patch . In this inspiring TED talk teenager Boyan Slat shows just how bad our plastic problem is – and he proposes a brilliant solution. Watch the video above to find out what it is! + TED Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Boyan Slat , great pacific garbage patch , ocean cleanup , Ocean Cleanup Array , ocean gyres , plastic , plastic pollution , TED , Video , Waste , water issues

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VIDEO: How the Oceans Can Clean Themselves of 7.25 Million Tons of Plastic Pollution

Floating Seawer Skyscraper Rids the World’s Oceans of Plastic While Generating Clean Energy

March 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Floating Seawer Skyscraper Rids the World’s Oceans of Plastic While Generating Clean Energy Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: evolo 2014 , eVolo 2014 Skyscraper Competition , Garbage Seascraper , Garbage-collecting Seascraper , great pacific garbage patch , ocean garbage , ocean waste , Seawer skyscraper , skyscraper evolo 2014 , waste collection        

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Floating Seawer Skyscraper Rids the World’s Oceans of Plastic While Generating Clean Energy

Over 168,000 Gallons of Oil Spills into Ecologically Sensitive Galveston Bay

March 24, 2014 by  
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A barge moving through Galveston Bay collided with another ship Saturday afternoon, spilling over 168,000 gallons of marine fuel oil. The spill is particularly devastating, even though it isn’t the largest in recent memory , because Galveston Bay is a migratory bird habitat and shorebird season is fast approaching. On top of that, the type of fuel that spilled is particularly difficult to clean up. The ship was being towed when it collided with the other vessel, though there are no details at this point on how the collision occurred. Read the rest of Over 168,000 Gallons of Oil Spills into Ecologically Sensitive Galveston Bay Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Bolivar Flats Shorebird Sanctuary , environmental destruction , environmental disaster , Galveston Bay bird sanctuary , Galveston Bay disaster , Galveston Bay ecological disaster , Galveston Bay oil disaster , Galveston Bay oil shipping , Galveston Bay oil spill , Galveston Bay shorebirds , Galveston Bay spill , Galveston Oil Spill , Galveston Spill , Galveston Texas Oil Spill , Galveston Texas spill , Migratory Bird oil spill , Migratory Bird Sanctuary , oil spill response , US Coast Guard , USCG , USCG oil spill response        

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Over 168,000 Gallons of Oil Spills into Ecologically Sensitive Galveston Bay

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