Airbnb will let you rent your own off-the-grid Caribbean island

August 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Airbnb will let you rent your own off-the-grid Caribbean island

Why settle for a beachfront cabana when you can rent the whole island? For $595 per night, Bird Island off the coast of Belize in the Caribbean could be yours. The listing comes courtesy of Airbnb , which plies such unique retreats as a treehouse in a 150-year-old oak , a replica of Vincent Van Gogh’s Bedroom in Arles , and a “floating” house on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. “Stay on your own in a truly private island on a beautiful atoll, with excellent swimming, snorkeling, kayaking and exploring—with all the comforts,” Airbnb promises. “It is a perfect setting for either a romantic get-away for a couple, a family gathering/reunion or for a small group of friends.” The spot, which is 20 minutes by boat from Placencia Village on the mainland, includes a private three-bedroom home that can accommodate up to six guests, a brand-new propane refrigerator and freezer, and a rainwater filtration system. Although Bird Island is off the grid—power is generated through solar and wind—you don’t have to be cut off from the world if you don’t want to. The locale boasts a phone for local numbers, plus “good and reliable” WiFi. Related: Washington Hobbit Hole is the first of three in an off-grid Shire Self-sufficiency is key, however. You’ll have to supply—or fish for—your own food. Snorkling or angling equipment is also strictly BYO. “The central theme of Bird Island is a self-catering, Robinson Crusoe type of adventure, yet with all the comforts, where one could get to do their own thing in total privacy,” Airbnb says. “We offer Bird Island at an exceptional price for an experience best-suited for the adventurous who are totally self-sufficient.” + Airbnb Photos via Airbnb Via Thrillist

Go here to see the original:
Airbnb will let you rent your own off-the-grid Caribbean island

LAVA breaks ground on sustainable energy tower in Heidelberg

August 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LAVA breaks ground on sustainable energy tower in Heidelberg

A dynamic new icon of sustainable energy is rising in Heidelberg, Germany. Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA) just broke ground on a new energy storage tower for Stadtwerke Heidelberg (SWH) that will be the Heidelberg’s tallest building and symbolize the city’s transition towards renewables . Designed to replace an existing gas tank, the new tower will be wrapped in a dynamic multi-layered facade made up of “energy loops” to render renewable energy visible to the public. The 56-meter-tall energy storage center with 19,500-cubic-meter capacity will be accompanied with a 10,000-square-meter park, both of which are slated for completion in mid-2019. Solar and wind energy will be harnessed and used to heat up the water and sold as heat energy. “This ‘knowledge store’ will replace a previous gas tank, a symbol of energy policy in the 1950s,” said Tobias Wallisser, director of LAVA. “Formally and geometrically the new water tank will not be much different from its predecessor. So this raised the challenge for us: How can the parameters of energy regeneration, decentrality, networking, flexibility and adaptivity be made visible in the design of the outer shell? How can an adaptive, dynamic system be produced without extreme technical control? Our task was to transform a big heavy industrial tank into a dynamic object.” Related: Futuristic green city design runs like a real rainforest in Malaysia The renovated tower is made up of a multi-layered facade with a spiral helix staircase that wraps around an insulating inner layer of mineral wool panels painted varying shades of blue. A cable network fitted between the annular supports creates the outer facade. Around 11,000 diamond-shaped stainless steel plates—the same number of households supplied with energy by the network—also clad the structure and can rotate up to 45 degrees horizontally in the wind. At night, the tower’s inner envelope is illuminated by LEDs that glow blue, green, and white that signify the filling up or emptying of the water storage tank. The publicly accessible tower features two elevators and roof-level event spaces, bistro, and viewing terraces. + Laboratory for Visionary Architecture

Continued here: 
LAVA breaks ground on sustainable energy tower in Heidelberg

Raku Inoue crafts delicate insect sculptures from colorful flowers

August 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Raku Inoue crafts delicate insect sculptures from colorful flowers

Even those scared of bugs won’t be able to resist the exquisite beauty of Raku Inoue’s insect sculptures. Crafted from delicate flower petals and leaves, ‘Natura Insects’ is a beautiful series of miniature flower arrangements pieced together to look like stag beetles, butterflies, and other insects. The Montreal-based Japanese artist draws from traditional Japanese arts such as ink painting (“sumi-e”) and flower arrangement (“ikebana”) and gives the art forms a new, modern twist. The Natura Insects series was completed as part of Raku Inoue’s ‘Challenge of the 9,’ in which he creates different art collections—each with nine works—that push his artistic boundaries. In Natura Insects, Inoue created nine insect sculptures out of leaves and flowers. He sets each creation against textured white paper and photographs them with his seal for Instagram . Related: Red Hong Yi Transforms Colorful Flower Petals into Exotic Birds The delicate creations are thoughtful compositions of texture, color, and pattern. The butterfly , for instance, comprises vibrantly colored petals of varying shapes with rounded petals at the center and long, skinny petals at the edges. In contrast, the less colorful moth features a pair of white flowers for antennae and a highly textured mix of green foliage for the body and wings. The series also includes a spider, a dragonfly, firefly, ladybug, and a variety of beetle types. You can follow Inoue’s prolific and experimental artworks and his ongoing Challenge of the 9 on Instagram or explore his clothing line at Reikan Apparel . + Raku Inoue Via Colossal Images via Raku Inoue

More here:
Raku Inoue crafts delicate insect sculptures from colorful flowers

Unprecedented Bleaching Leaves the Great Barrier Reef Terminal

April 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Unprecedented Bleaching Leaves the Great Barrier Reef Terminal

In 2016, the Great Barrier Reef saw the worst bleaching event on record — two-thirds (67 percent) of corals in the northern sector of the reef died after being exposed to unusually warm currents. While experts warned that these bleaching events…

The rest is here:
Unprecedented Bleaching Leaves the Great Barrier Reef Terminal

Rising ocean temperatures are cooking the Great Barrier Reef to death

April 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Rising ocean temperatures are cooking the Great Barrier Reef to death

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef offers dramatic evidence of the reality of climate change . Scientists have found an astonishing two-thirds of the reef undergoing mass coral bleaching as warmer ocean temperatures are basically boiling them to death. James Kerry, a scientist with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies , told CNN when ocean temperatures are hot for long periods of time, corals don’t simply bleach but “cook and they die very quickly.” 2016 saw a bleaching event that was the worst coral die-off we’ve ever recorded, and now a 2017 event makes matters worse. ARC Centre director Terry Hughes said the impact of back-to-back bleaching sprawls across 900 miles; only the southern third of the Great Barrier Reef is unharmed. It’s the second time in only 12 months scientists have recorded mass bleaching in the reef after aerial surveys. Related: Great Barrier Reef bleaching is the “worst coral die-off” in recorded history And 2017’s bleaching can’t be explained away by El Niño . Hughes said the bleaching “is caused by record-breaking temperatures driven by global warming .” The Great Barrier Reef has experienced severe bleaching in 1998, 2002, and now 2016 and 2017, according to scientists. Kerry said bleached corals don’t always die, but take at least a decade to make a full recovery, so with back-to-back bleaching they expect coral loss. Tropical Cyclone Debbie didn’t help either. The storm may have left damage in its wake when it hit part of the Great Barrier Reef at the end of March. Hughes said in a statement, “Clearly the reef is struggling with multiple impacts. Without a doubt the most pressing of these is global warming. As temperatures continue to rise the corals will experience more and more of these events: one degree Celsius of warming so far has already caused four events in the past 19 years. Ultimately we need to cut carbon emissions , and the window to do so is rapidly closing.” Via the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and CNN Images via Bette Willis and Ed Roberts/ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Read more from the original source:
Rising ocean temperatures are cooking the Great Barrier Reef to death

Scientists say Great Barrier Reef coral death has reached devastating heights

October 27, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists say Great Barrier Reef coral death has reached devastating heights

Data from a period of widespread coral bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef is trickling in and it does not look good. Researchers are finding that the formerly pristine northern section of the reef has been hit especially hard , with up to 80 percent of corals killed as a result of warming waters or subsequent predators and disease. A recent report from researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook Universit y in Queensland shows the most up to date state of the damage. Scientists have taken several surveys since March, when the area was inundated with unseasonably warm waters – each painting a bleaker picture than the last. Estimates in May suggested at least 50 percent of the northern reef had died, a statistic that was bumped up to 80 percent with these recent findings. “The mortality is devastating really,” senior research fellow Andrew Hoey told The Washington Post . “It’s a lot higher than we had hoped.” Related: No, the Great Barrier Reef isn’t dead – but it is damaged If there is any silver lining to this report, it is that the central and southern areas of the reef were not hit as badly as the north. To put things into perspective, a total 22 percent of corals have died cross the entire reef, according to the The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority . Where the damage is most severe, researchers note the influx of climate change-induced warm waters resulted in the first wave of coral die-off. Invasion of predatory snails and disease have since swept in to kill much of the surviving corals. This particular bleaching event is said to be even worse than those of 1998 and 2002 – though more data needs to be gathered. Hoey says it could take one or two decades for the reef to recover from such devastation, assuming another mass bleaching event does not strike again in that time. With climate change doing anything but slowing down, those chances might be slim. Via  The Washington Post Images via  Wikimedia , Pixabay

The rest is here: 
Scientists say Great Barrier Reef coral death has reached devastating heights

United Nations climate change cover up sets off alarm bells

August 3, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on United Nations climate change cover up sets off alarm bells

It should come as no surprise that Australia is feeling the effects of climate change as much as the rest of the world, but the United Nations doesn’t want people to know about it. A UNESCO report on the impact of global warming on world heritage sites suspiciously failed to mention Australia, even though an earlier version of the report did. Heavily redacted emails between the agency and the country’s government indicate a cover up . The Guardian reported on UNESCO’s report, which came from a partnership with the United Nations Environmental Programme and the Union of Concerned Scientists . An earlier version contained scientific information about Australia’s multiple sites impacted by climate change, including The Great Barrier Reef . No mention of the continent was in the final release, including mentions scrubbed from the introduction. Related: More than one-third of the coral is dead in parts of Great Barrier Reef Emails sent between UNESCO and Australian government agencies, acquired under freedom of information, are heavily redacted, as revealed by Climate Home . These suspicious communications aren’t sitting well with Australian Climate Council member William Steffen, who peer reviewed the missing sections on The Great Barrier Reef. He told The Guardian , “One would assume they would report on the science – you can do what you want with the science once it’s reported. But what gets us really concerned is when we see the science itself suppressed. That starts ringing alarm bells in scientist’s minds. That’s something that shouldn’t be happening in a western democracy.” Via  The Guardian Images via  Wikimedia , Pixabay

See the original post here: 
United Nations climate change cover up sets off alarm bells

For the tourism industry, there’s no vacation from climate change

June 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on For the tourism industry, there’s no vacation from climate change

Tour operators of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef unite to demand the government divest from coal.

See more here:
For the tourism industry, there’s no vacation from climate change

More than one-third of the coral is dead in parts of Great Barrier Reef

June 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on More than one-third of the coral is dead in parts of Great Barrier Reef

The news about the bleaching event taking place in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef just keeps getting worse. Researchers have reported that in the northern and central regions of the reef, at least 35% of the bleached corals have died. In some areas the rate is as high as 50%. There is a little good news, though. The southern portion of the iconic landmark seems to have escaped the worst, with many of the corals beginning to recover their color. This is the third major bleaching event in the past 18 years for the reef, and the most extensive so far. Scientists are blaming the poor condition of the reef on a number of environmental factors, including water pollution and global warming. With the Australian government considering approval for new coal mines nearby in Queensland, the situation could become even more dire. Related: Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching is now more widespread than ever Though this year’s bleaching has been linked to unusually warm waters due to El Niño, Professor Terry Hughes of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University calls the staggering statistics “a huge wake up call” and warns that it’s unlikely the corals will be able to fully recover before a fourth or fifth bleaching event takes place. Environmental advocates warn that unless action is taken immediately to slow global warming, much of the world’s coral may vanish . Via Slashdot Images via ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

See original here:
More than one-third of the coral is dead in parts of Great Barrier Reef

Swedish rnsro Timber Town relies on wood to lower its carbon footprint

June 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Swedish rnsro Timber Town relies on wood to lower its carbon footprint

Created in collaboration with Slättö Förvaltning , the approximately 18,000-square-meter Örnsro Timber Town comprises residential units as well as plazas and other structures for social meetings and recreation. The solid timber-framed buildings will be built to a variety of heights for visual interest. Residents and visitors will be encouraged to walk or bike through the neighborhood along the ‘activity route’ that snakes through the quarter and connects to existing promenade sections along Svartån creek. Related: C.F. Møller’s Solar-Powered Wood Skyscraper Wins HSB Stockholm Architecture Competition “We wish to create an including urban quarter in which the city’s urban and social qualities interact with the park’s organic structures. The proposal illustrates a vision with the objective to create an exciting place in Örebro, of unique value, with innovative architecture ,” said Ola Jonsson, the project architect at C.F. Møller. “For us, it is an obvious choice to choose solid wood for structure as well as façades of wood. In addition to contributing positively to the environment, wood gives us new opportunities to create innovative and value-creating architecture.” + C.F. Møller Images via C.F. Møller

Go here to see the original: 
Swedish rnsro Timber Town relies on wood to lower its carbon footprint

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1340 access attempts in the last 7 days.