Bloombergs new London HQ rated worlds most sustainable office

October 3, 2017 by  
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Bloomberg’s new European headquarters in London scored a 98.5% against the latest BREEAM sustainability rating scheme—making it the world’s most sustainable office building, as designed. Certified BREEAM Outstanding with its design-stage score, the Foster + Partners -designed project uses 73% less water and 35% less energy than a typical office building. Innovative energy saving technologies are visibly integrated into the building, from the beautiful and multifunctional petal-leaf ceiling panels to the façade’s bronze solar shading fins. From design development to construction, sustainability played a key role in the Bloomberg European HQ project. A 95% recycling rate of demolition and construction waste was achieved during the six-year construction process thanks to the reuse of existing structural foundations and a unique waste management system that tracked waste production. The new London building is one of Bloomberg’s 34 LEED or BREEAM -certified projects globally. The most eye-catching energy-saving feature of the new office headquarters is the approximately 4,000 integrated ceiling panels that combine heating, cooling, lighting, and acoustic functions. Half a million LED lights are embedded into the bespoke ceiling panels and use 40% less energy than a typical fluorescent office lighting system. The ceiling panels’ metal petals also use elevated chilled water temperatures to reduce energy use in a first-of-its-kind integrated cooling system. Related: Peek inside Bloomberg’s sustainable new headquarters in London An on-site Combined Heat and Power (CHP) generation center supplies heat and power in a single, efficient system that’s estimated to save 500 to 700 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide annually. Rooftop solar also provides additional power. To cool the building naturally, the facade is equipped with 117 operable large bronze fins that open and close for natural ventilation. Smart sensing controls automatically adjust airflow depending on occupancy. Rainwater from the roof, cooling tower blow-off water, and gray water are captured, treated, and recycled to flush toilets. + Foster + Partners Images via Foster + Partners

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Luxury lakeside hotel promises a return to nature in Italy

October 3, 2017 by  
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Architecture studio noa* mixes alpine and Mediterranean influences in their renovation of a family-run hotel in Italy. Located on a high plateau next to a small natural lake, Hotel Seehof is a luxury hotel that celebrates nature in its use of materials, design, and programming. The nature retreat features an undulating roof that mirrors Natz-Schabs’ mountain scenery while its earth-colored plaster and use of timber references the nearby forests. Hotel Seehof completed its major renovation and expansion earlier this year and now includes 16 new suites as well as a new pool and wellness area. Guests are invited to take a dip in the lake, “Flötscher Weiher,” that serves as the main focal point of the project. Sinuous lines and pathways seamlessly link the hotel grounds, including the oblique green roofs of the spa, to the surrounding forests and fruit orchards. Related: Frank Gehry-designed luxury hotel brings avant-garde design to historic Spain winery “The wooden façade and its rough surface are related to the environment, with a focus on incorporating regional materials. The communication with the lake – important characteristic and name of the hotel – is deliberately staged here,” wrote the architects. The interior design pays homage to Hotel Seehof’s site history. Copper pipes are used extensively throughout the interior as a design element and to reference to the widely used water pipes that were installed for the apple orchards in the 1950s. As with the exterior, a natural materials palette is used for the interior design. + noa* Images by Alex Filz

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Luxury lakeside hotel promises a return to nature in Italy

Zaha Hadid Architects Melbourne high-rise will use 50 percent less energy than the typical mixed-use tower

July 18, 2016 by  
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Located between Collins Street and the Docklands on the west edge of Melbourne’s Central Business District, 600 Collins Street is set in a high-density and pedestrian-friendly environment. The 178-meter-tall, 54-storey tower will comprise 420 apartments, offices, retail, and public spaces that will seamlessly link the building to the surrounding urban fabric . Its sculptural facade looks like a series of stacked and tapered vases, each of which contains a different programmatic element. “The design has been defined by Melbourne’s rich and diverse urban landscape, reinterpreted in a contemporary solution driven by the logical division of its overall volume that will enhance the city’s public realm with generous communal spaces,” said Zaha Hadid Architects’ Michele Pasca di Magliano. “We are honoured to be working with our partners in Melbourne to deliver this project for the city.” Related: Zaha Hadid Architects win Danjiang Bridge competition in Taiwan The tower’s curvaceous facade will help deflect harsh solar gain to reduce cooling needs. High-performance glazing, high-efficiency central cooling, smart energy lighting, and graywater -reuse systems will also help reduce resource consumption and the building’s energy footprint. The new civic spaces will include public plazas, terraces, and pedestrian pathways that connect to the Southern Cross railway station and the tram network. Shared car clubs, electric vehicle bays, and 350 bicycle parking spaces will also be integrated into the building. + Zaha Hadid Architects Images via Zaha Hadid Architects

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Zaha Hadid Architects Melbourne high-rise will use 50 percent less energy than the typical mixed-use tower

Israel’s greenest building produces more energy than it consumes

June 13, 2016 by  
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Tel Aviv University’s Porter School of Environmental Studies (PSES) wasn’t interested in achieving the minimum LEED certification — this building lives and breathes a dedication to the planet. In order to be awarded LEED Platinum certification a building must earn at least 80 points, but PSES surpassed this standard by leaps and bounds, completing construction with an impressive 92 points. The state-of-the-art solar energy system includes solar PVs and tubes that line the facade of the building. Any energy that the building doesn’t use is sent to other buildings at Tel Aviv University. When Inhabitat visited Israel it was upwards of 30 degrees celsius (90 degrees Fahrenheit) and we were astounded by how cool this building felt without any use of mechanical air conditioning. Using computational dynamics simulations, the architects were able to achieve 100 percent passive ventilation using natural airflow through the solar tubes, producing a low and high pressure Venturi effect that provides both heat during the winter and natural cooling in summer. PSES currently offers an International MA program that is focused on Middle East water issues, climate change, and several other environmental subjects. While Israel may be situated within the world’s most arid climate, you wouldn’t know it by experiencing its lush, verdant landscape. As a leader in conservation, the country reuses 70 percent of its water through water recycling initiatives . The Porter School is a prime example of a serious dedication to water conservation, utilizing an impressive drip irrigation system generated entirely from wastewater recycling. Students are also constantly experimenting with new alternative energy systems that could potentially be used on the PSES building; they are currently testing algal power in a lab that is viewable to passersby. An ecologically constructed wetland system purifies gray water for the landscape irrigation of a large native plant green roof and plentiful landscaping around the building’s facade. One of the prime goals of the project was to not destroy the original landscape for living creatures around the building. Dr. Joseph Cory, founder of Geotectura , told Inhabitat that he hopes the design “will create a new architectural vocabulary [for Israel] — people will start to ask what you are growing on your building, which is a different state of mind.” RELATED: Tel Aviv’s Gran Mediterraneo Tower will feature a lush vertical garden The interior and exterior of the building was completely constructed from local, recycled or renewable materials, including fiber cement, recycled wood, and bamboo. The majority of the exterior is clad with glass panels, providing an ample amount of natural daylight that eliminates any need for artificial lighting during the day. The remainder of the lighting is produced with an efficient LED system. One of the most captivating aspects of this building’s interior is the floating “Capsule” that hovers over the building’s atrium. Dr. Cory explained that the fascinating addition was designed to serve as both a quiet meeting place and “a constant reminder for the students that we have only one Earth.” He added that “we are living in a western culture that is behaving like we have two or three Mother Earths to take from, but this is not a way to keep on if you want to consider the living of future generations and of course people from other continents that are not living in the western world.” + The Porter School of Environmental Studies Photos by Laura Mordas-Schenkein for Inhabitat

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Israel’s greenest building produces more energy than it consumes

Re-Ainbow is a colorful center for a climate change impacted community in Vietnam

August 26, 2015 by  
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Re-ainbow is a multifunctional construction project for the community  in Vietnam that is prone to the effects of climate change and natural disaster. The structure can be used as a health station, public restrooms and ancillary areas, as well as featuring a classroom, art performance theater, meeting place, sports fitness center, refreshment tent, which possess multiple functions with the use of movable partition walls and enclosing walls according to their respective needs. Outside, there are areas for physical training such as volleyball, badminton, long jump, and other outdoor activities as well. The aim of the project is to help improve public capability to adapt and respond to climate change via re-use of waste items and efficient use of energy. The structure utilizes a variety of old/ broken construction materials such as scaffolding steel pipes, sheet metals, bricks, ashlars, bathroom ware, tables and chairs. Ventilation and natural lighting are also dealt with efficiently. Solar energy is converted into electricity for lighting facilities and heating water for daily use and rain water and used water are also utilized. +  H&P Architects Photographs by Doan Thanh Ha The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!  

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Re-Ainbow is a colorful center for a climate change impacted community in Vietnam

Innovative geothermal office nabs Germany’s highest environmental certification

August 21, 2015 by  
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Denton Corker Marshall Opens Doors to New, Energy-Efficient Stonehenge Visitor Center

December 19, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Denton Corker Marshall Opens Doors to New, Energy-Efficient Stonehenge Visitor Center Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Denton Corker Marshall , energy efficient , gray water , locally harvested materials , neolithic man , prehistoric monument , renewable materials , salisbury limestone , Stonehenge , stonehenge visitor center , sweet chestnut , visitor center        

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Denton Corker Marshall Opens Doors to New, Energy-Efficient Stonehenge Visitor Center

EcoCool is a Water Filter that Waters Houseplants with Treated Greywater

October 11, 2012 by  
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EcoCool is a system designed by Ardavan Mirhosseini  to filter and reuse the greywater produced in showers and sinks (but not toilets). The water passes through two separate filters and can also be used to cool and moisturize the space. After the water makes its way through this system it is now clean enough to grow plants and vegetables. EcoCool consists of two filters; the first filter is hidden while the second filter is a series of wall tiles that are full of channels filled with sand and marble allowing water to pass through. These wall tiles separate the water into small enough droplets that they can be vaporized into the air, cooling the air and the system in the process. In addition to cooling hot air, EcoCool moisturizes dry air through the process of vaporization. + Ardavan Mirhosseini The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Ardavan Mirhosseini , Eco-cool , ecocool , ecocool water filter , gray water , grey water , greywater filter , greywater treatment , water filter

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EcoCool is a Water Filter that Waters Houseplants with Treated Greywater

Bloc10: Unique Prefab Condos Showcase Sustainably Sourced Wood in Winnipeg

October 11, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Bloc10: Unique Prefab Condos Showcase Sustainably Sourced Wood in Winnipeg Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , 5468796 architecture , bloc 10 , bloc10 , block10 , canada , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green seed developments , Manitoba , Prefab , prefab apartments , prefab condos , prefab housing project , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , sustainable wood , sustainably harvested wood , winnipeg

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Bloc10: Unique Prefab Condos Showcase Sustainably Sourced Wood in Winnipeg

15 smart products that make bathrooms water efficient

April 13, 2010 by  
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According to recent reports about 1 billion people in the world lack access to clean drinking water and there are millions of people who succumb to water-related diseases annually. These figures aren’t only surprising, but also make the privileged think about that the hundreds of liters of water that is wasted each day in their bathrooms.

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