Researchers invent paper that can be printed with light and reused 80 times

February 6, 2017 by  
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In an effort to fight the detrimental environmental impact of inkjet printing, researchers have invented a new type of “paper” that can be printed with light and re-written up to 80 times. Their invention employs the color-changing chemistry of nanoparticles, which can be applied via a thin coating to a variety of surfaces – including conventional paper . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnCyTb6bgJA Researchers from Shandong University in China, the University of California, Riverside and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently published a study detailing the invention of light-printable, rewritable paper. “The greatest significance of our work is the development of a new class of solid-state photo-reversible color-switching system to produce an ink-free light-printable rewritable paper that has the same feel and appearance as conventional paper, but can be printed and erased repeatedly without the need for additional ink,” explains Yadong Yin, professor of chemistry at the University of California, Riverside. “Our work is believed to have enormous economic and environmental merits to modern society.” Why not just use recycled paper, you might ask? As Phys.org explains, the chemicals used in paper production are a leading source of industrial pollution, and abandoned paper makes up about 40 percent of the contents of landfills. Recycled paper contributes to the pollution problem through the process of ink removal. Add to that problems around deforestation, and the case for minimizing paper usage is a strong one. Related: Should your family give up paper towels? The new light-printable paper lends itself perfectly to applications where printed information is only needed for a short time, and it could be applied to any medium used for this purpose. “We believe the rewritable paper has many practical applications involving temporary information recording and reading, such as newspapers, magazines, posters, notepads, writing easels, product life indicators, oxygen sensors, and rewritable labels for various applications,” Yin said Via Phys.org Images via UC Riverside and Aidenvironment , Wikimedia Commons

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Researchers invent paper that can be printed with light and reused 80 times

INFOGRAPHIC: What your brain looks like on LSD

June 28, 2016 by  
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For the first time ever, scientists have been able to see just what LSD does to the human brain. Though declared off limits for medical use in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, today scientists are exploring how this drug can actually help those with mental illness. LSD increases the connection between the parts of the brain that control how we perceive our environment and how we perceive ourselves, helping ease the rigid and inflexible thought-patterns common among those with mental illness. But what about the harm? LSD has been off-limits for a reason, after all. This infographic explores what scientists have learned about LSD so far and what it does to your brain.

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INFOGRAPHIC: What your brain looks like on LSD

Scientists found oxygen in a galaxy 13.1 billion light years distant

June 28, 2016 by  
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Astronomers from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan  have found ” the most distant oxygen ever detected ” 13.1 billion light years away from us in a galaxy called SXDF-NB1006-2. Not only is the discovery of oxygen elsewhere exciting, but it provides clues into oxygen’s origin in the universe. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the astronomers collected data on the galaxy first found four years ago. They’d detected hydrogen , but suspected oxygen might be present as well. They theorized that if they were correct, the galaxy would be going through cosmic reionization, or the process where radiation ionizes gas clouds. They were right: they detected reionization through a predicted light flare visible even this far away, confirming oxygen’s presence in SXDF-NB1006-2. Related: Astronomers just discovered an alien planet with three suns that shouldn’t exist Such a process occurred in the early days of our universe, so by studying that process in SXDF-NB1006-2, the astronomers could glean insight into the “origin of oxygen.” Lead author Akio K. Inoue told Gizmodo, “These oxygen atoms we found are a kind of the first oxygen ever produced in the Universe, because oxygen did not exist at the Big Bang. In fact, all elements heavier than lithium are produced inside stars and are spread out the Universe when they die. And oxygen and other elements make up dust particles which eventually make up planets and possibly life on them. Therefore, our finding shows the origin of oxygen, one of the most important elements for humans, in this Universe.” If humans were present on SXDF-NB1006-2, we wouldn’t be able to breathe the oxygen. It’s only present in very small quantities – not even one-tenth of the amount of oxygen in the sun – and as it is ” doubly-ionized oxygen atoms ,” is not even the type of oxygen we could breathe. However, the astronomers plan to continue their research to probe further into oxygen’s role in the universe. Via Gizmodo Images via National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Wikimedia Commons

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Scientists found oxygen in a galaxy 13.1 billion light years distant

Spiral Stool is a sturdy flat-pack stool made from 100% recyclable cardboard

June 28, 2016 by  
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Cardboard might not seem like a sturdy material to build furniture with, let alone an attractive option, but Taipei-based MisoSoupDesign’s Spiral Stool proves cardboard furniture can be strong, beautiful, and eco-friendly to boot. Made from 100% recyclable cardboard, the spiral stool is a flat pack stool that’s easy to assemble without the need for any special tools and can support up to 100 kilograms of weight. The Spiral Stool just awarded the Platinum A’Design Award in Furniture, Decorative Items and Homeware Design competition Category. + MisoSoupDesign The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Spiral Stool is a sturdy flat-pack stool made from 100% recyclable cardboard

Artist makes Dust Jewelry out of soil from abandoned Icelandic farms

June 28, 2016 by  
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Icelandic artist Ágústa Sveinsdóttir reminds us all of the transience of nature by crafting jewelry out of a simple material: dust. Collected from the soil of deserted farms in the Icelandic countryside, with time the Dust jewelry withers away, revealing a manmade structure — a sort of skeleton within — giving the bearer a chance to savour every moment of its life span. Using a biodegradable adhesive, dust is transformed into a jewel coating. It is a celebration of the fragile beauty that time and use impart to materials. + Dust Jewelry The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Artist makes Dust Jewelry out of soil from abandoned Icelandic farms

This 55-foot-tall residential green wall will be the largest of its kind in New York

June 28, 2016 by  
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The 32,000-square-foot building will house seven residences with prices ranging from $5.75 million for a half-floor unit to full-floor apartments that start at $14.8 million. Each unit will have a flexible layout , with minimal interior walls. The residences were individually configured to be easily adapted to successive owners. Ando’s signature material palette- concrete , metal and glass will dominate the spaces, with the exterior green wall as the highlight of the exterior. Related: How The Clark Art Institute’s Renovation Saved a Whopping 1,000,000 Gallons of Water Upon completion, the wall will be 55 feet tall and 99 feet wide, and will be planted with a combination of vines , including English Ivy, Boston Ivy, Virginia Creepers, Jasmine Clematis and climbing Hydrangeas. This variety will allow the living structure to change appearance throughout the year and feature different textures and vibrant colors. + 152 Elizabeth Street + Tadao Ando + M. Paul Friedberg and Partners Images via Tadao Ando and 152 Elizabeth Street

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This 55-foot-tall residential green wall will be the largest of its kind in New York

NASA video sheds light on the dark side of the moon

February 10, 2015 by  
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Ever wonder what lurks on the dark side of the moon? Now you can see it like never before. The hemisphere of the moon that always faces away from Earth was largely uncharted until 1959, when a Soviet space probe photographed it. Now NASA has provided a whole new view of the moon’s far side, via a computer-generated video that shows the phases of the moon as seen from the side facing away from Earth. Read the rest of NASA video sheds light on the dark side of the moon Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: computer , dark side of the moon , far side of the moon , graphics , Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter , nasa , phases , science , space , Technology , Video

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NASA video sheds light on the dark side of the moon

“Pictures Without Ink” Create Tactile Graphics for the Blind

December 6, 2010 by  
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Architect Keith Carlson is currently working on “ Pictures Without Ink ,” a new method of creating tactile graphics for the blind through the use of rapid prototyping. He’s worked on his project for the past 6 years and it is now in the running to receive a grant of $25,000. Click here to see a video about the project and vote for it! READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: graphics for the blind , keith carlson , pictures without ink , tactile graphics for the blind

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“Pictures Without Ink” Create Tactile Graphics for the Blind

Cheese-Making Bacteria Could Be Used to Produce Biofuels

December 6, 2010 by  
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A team at Concordia University recently discovered a novel way to produce sustainable biofuels using bacteria commonly used to transform milk into cheese. According to the study, professors Vincent Martin and his PhD student Andrew Wieczorek believe that the bacteria Lactococcus lactis , could digest plant matter to turn it into biofuel. In their study, the two Concordia researchers describe how the bacteria maintains specific structural and scaffolding proteins that can help in the breaking down of biological material

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Cheese-Making Bacteria Could Be Used to Produce Biofuels

Top 5 posts from Barcelona Climate Talks This Week

November 5, 2009 by  
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All eyes are on the city of Barcelona this week, as the last round of climate talks take place before the campaign roadshow moves onto to its final destination in Copenhagen in December .

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Top 5 posts from Barcelona Climate Talks This Week

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