New graphene sieve can remove even small salts from seawater

April 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New graphene sieve can remove even small salts from seawater

Graphene is the world’s strongest material, but that’s not all it can do. The wonder material can also be used as a filter that removes salts from seawater so it’s safe to drink. While scientists have eyed graphene-oxide membranes for better filtration – and even showed graphene could filter out large salts – now 13 University of Manchester scientists developed graphene membranes that can sieve common, smaller salts out of water. It takes small sieves to remove common salts from substances like seawater, and in the past when placed in water graphene-oxide membranes swelled, and weren’t able to catch those smaller salts. The University of Manchester scientists found a way to control the pore size of the graphene to sieve those common small salts out of water. Professor Rahul Nair, one of the scientists part of the research, said the realization of “membranes with uniform pore size down to atomic scale” is a significant step. Related: Affordable new biofoam could revolutionize how developing countries clean water The discovery could open doors to efficient, less expensive desalination technology – which the university points out is crucial as climate change depletes water supply in modern cities. In just around eight years, 14 percent of the world’s population could face water scarcity, according to United Nations estimates, and not all countries can afford large, expensive desalination plants to provide relief to their citizens. The university says the graphene technology pursued by the scientists could revolutionize water filtration around the world, offering an affordable option for developing countries . The researchers think their discovery could be scaled up for wider use. Nair said in a statement, “This is the first clear-cut experiment in this regime. We also demonstrate that there are realistic possibilities to scale up the described approach and mass produce graphene-based membranes with required sieve sizes.” The journal Nature Nanotechnology published the research online yesterday. Via The University of Manchester Images via The University of Manchester and Pixabay

Read more from the original source: 
New graphene sieve can remove even small salts from seawater

Affordable new biofoam could revolutionize how developing countries clean water

August 19, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Affordable new biofoam could revolutionize how developing countries clean water

What happens when you embed graphene in ” bacteria-produced cellulose “? You get a biofoam that could revolutionize the way people in developing countries obtain clean water . Scientists from Washington University in St. Louis who developed the biofoam published their findings in the journal Advanced Materials earlier this month. It seems there’s little graphene can’t do: the researchers used its powers of light absorption to design an inexpensive, light biofoam from which dirty water evaporates quickly to create drinking water. Working with a colleague from the Air Force Research Laboratory, seven scientists at Washington University in St. Louis have now developed a ” bi-layered biofoam .” Related: New graphene solar panels turn rain into clean energy The biofoam is made of two layers of nanocellulose. Bacteria is involved in making both layers: the bottom layer is comprised purely of bacteria-produced nanocellulose, while the top layer is nanocellulose embedded with graphene oxide. The bottom layer acts similar to a sponge, pulling water up to the biofoam. When the water is pulled to the graphene oxide layer, the heat present due to graphene oxide makes the water evaporate. The resulting fresh water “can easily be collected from the top of the sheet,” according to the university. Mechanical engineering and materials science associate professor Srikanth Singamaneni said in a press release, “We hope that for countries where there is ample sunlight, such as India , you’ll be able to take some dirty water, evaporate it using our material, and collect fresh water.” Since the biofoam can be made inexpensively, the scientists think their vision of water-cleaning biofoam serving those in developing countries could easily become reality. Sigamaneni said, “Cellulose can be produced on a massive scale, and graphene oxide is extremely cheap – people can produce tons, truly tons, of it. Both materials going into this are highly scalable. So one can imagine making huge sheets of the biofoam.” The scientists plan to continue their research, seeking additional applications of the revolutionary biofoam. + Washington University of St. Louis Images via Washington University in St. Louis and Milaap.org on Flickr

The rest is here: 
Affordable new biofoam could revolutionize how developing countries clean water

Beautiful timber office sequesters carbon in Austria

August 19, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Beautiful timber office sequesters carbon in Austria

Located in Mödling, Austria, 52 Cubic Wood is mostly clad in vertical strips of timber carefully crafted and joined together. In addition to its beautiful appearance, timber was chosen over concrete and steel because of its advantage as a “carbon sink” thanks to trees’ absorption of carbon dioxide through photosynthesis. That carbon is not released until the timber decomposes or is burnt. Aside from the timber cladding, a mirrored facade partially covers the ground level. The angled mirrors reflect the foliage of the outdoor gardens. Large windows also frame views of the outdoor landscape and bring in natural light to illuminate the interior. Related: World’s tallest hybrid timber tower by Shigeru Ban coming to Vancouver The office spaces span two floors and are similarly clad in light-colored wooden surfaces and complemented with timber furnishings. “52 cubic wood – produces carbohydrate (glucose) from carbon dioxide CO2 (which equates to 260.000km by car) with the help of the sun,” write the architects. “Additionally oxygen is released in the form of breathable air for 100 years per person. This happens interference-free without waste and emissions, it‘s quiet and fully automatic. This is the beauty of the factory called ‘The forest’.” + JOSEP + Atelier Gerhard Haumer Via ArchDaily Images via JOSEP , © Bernhard Fiedler

View original post here:
Beautiful timber office sequesters carbon in Austria

Super strong graphene could revolutionize battery power by extracting hydrogen from thin air

December 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Super strong graphene could revolutionize battery power by extracting hydrogen from thin air

Graphene , the first two-dimensional crystal known to man, could be the key to stronger, longer lasting batteries. Similar in atomic structure to the graphite found in pencils, graphene has properties you won’t find in any writing implement. It’s 200 times stronger than steel, more than one million times thinner than a human hair, and is a highly conductive material on the molecular level. On top of all that, it is capable of extracting hydrogen from the atmosphere, which could reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. Read the rest of Super strong graphene could revolutionize battery power by extracting hydrogen from thin air Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , “sustainable energy” , Andrew Geim , battery technology , battery technology graphene , graphene , graphene battery , graphene technology , graphene uses , hydrogen battery , Kostya Novoselov , Manchester University , Manchester University battery , mobile electric generator , renewable energy

Go here to read the rest: 
Super strong graphene could revolutionize battery power by extracting hydrogen from thin air

Energy-efficient, pine-clad Danish home is heated with geothermal energy

December 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Energy-efficient, pine-clad Danish home is heated with geothermal energy

Read the rest of Energy-efficient, pine-clad Danish home is heated with geothermal energy Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: annex , danish architecture , Denmark , Douglas pine , energy efficient architecture , floor to ceiling windows , geothermal energy , lakeside architecture , Mette Lange Architects , pine-clad architecture , skylights , Slangerup , Villa Buresø

Read the original post:
Energy-efficient, pine-clad Danish home is heated with geothermal energy

When it comes to storm warnings, look to the birds

December 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on When it comes to storm warnings, look to the birds

Instead of waiting for the tornado siren, human beings might want to look to the birds when it comes to escaping major storm systems – as new research show they may have survival instincts far beyond those previously discovered. Earlier this year a group of golden-winged warblers that live high in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee caught the eye of the scientists from the University of Minnesota   when they suddenly left town just before a devastating storm hit. Read the rest of When it comes to storm warnings, look to the birds Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: birds , birdwatching , Climate Change , danger , global warming , golden , science , severe storms , storms , Survival , tornadoes , warbler , Wildlife , winged

More here:
When it comes to storm warnings, look to the birds

Bad Behavior has blocked 1488 access attempts in the last 7 days.