Restaurant furniture company launches sustainable brand for residential kitchens

January 28, 2021 by  
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Grand Rapids Chair Co., a company based out of Michigan that has specialized in restaurant furniture for 20 years, has launched a new, sustainable brand for residential kitchens called Only Good Things. The brand will focus on consumers by offering high-quality furniture meant for kitchens and dining areas made using sustainably harvested wood from northeastern American forests and U.S.-sourced steel . The line of chairs, stools, tables and outdoor pieces is meant to be a solution to family kitchens that may have become strained during the pandemic lockdowns.  Each piece of furniture is made to order. In addition to a composition of responsibly harvested wood and American steel, the furnishings are also finished using an antimicrobial, commercial-grade topcoat, similar to what you would find inside a restaurant . The topcoat can withstand even the toughest stains, including things like mustard and wine, making pieces especially durable. Families who may have had to reevaluate their home spaces, turning kitchen tables into classrooms or home offices for example, will certainly serve to benefit from this added versatility and resilience. Related: Serif + Sero modular furniture is made of 100% upcycled cardboard “Twenty years ago with Grand Rapids Chair Co., we set out to create a brand centered around high quality, high design, and accessible pieces,” said Dean Jeffery, creative director at Only Good Things. “Today, we’re bringing that same passion to the residential market. These pieces aren’t just aesthetically pleasing, they are tested to strict durability standards that most other brands ignore, making them an investment people can be proud of.” Each piece will be tested to BIFMA standards, a certification program for contract furniture that ensures a stringent set of quality, performance and sustainability benchmarks created by the Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer’s Association. Style-wise, Only Good Things furniture is light and contemporary with strong lines, modern shapes and soft seating. The long-term pieces are designed to play well with a wide range of home décor and compliment anything from classic to midcentury to minimalist aesthetics. All furniture is made in the United States with a two-week lead time. + Only Good Things Images via Only Good Things

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Restaurant furniture company launches sustainable brand for residential kitchens

UK plans to reduce grey squirrel population via contraceptives

January 28, 2021 by  
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There’s not much cuter than a baby squirrel — until they grow up to be invasive acorn hoarders that interfere with tree planting and, by extension, efforts to slow  climate change . So, U.K. environment minister Lord Goldsmith has announced it’s time to put these squirrels on the pill. And what a delicious oral contraceptive it will be. The plan is that grey squirrels will follow their noses into special squirrel-only feeding boxes containing contraceptive-spiked hazelnut spread. Even the most reckless breeders are likely to succumb to  family  planning when it tastes this good. Related: Could contraception for pigeons be a humane option for population control? “We hope advances in science can safely help our nature to thrive, including through the humane control of  invasive species ,” the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) told BBC News on Tuesday. An estimated three million grey squirrels, along with their fellow invasive species, damage U.K. woodlands to the tune of £1.8 billion a year. Grey squirrels came to the  U.K.  from North America in the late 1800s. Since then, they’ve gone on a bark-stripping rampage. Their favorite targets are younger trees between 10 and 50 years old, especially ecologically important broad-leafed types such as oak. Grey squirrels also displaced native red squirrels. Only about 140,000 red squirrels remain in the U.K., according to  The Wildlife Trusts . Simon Lloyd, chief executive of the Royal Forestry Society, has accused grey squirrels of undermining efforts to combat global warming. New  trees  must be protected in order to “deliver the carbon capture or biodiversity objectives if grey squirrels cannot be controlled,” Lloyd told the Daily Telegraph. The Royal Forestry Society is one of 37 conservation and land management organizations that make up the UK Squirrel Accord ( UKSA ), which proposed the contraceptive strategy. The plan has the royal okay. Prince Charles, a patron of the Red Squirrel Survival Trust, wrote of  Britain’s  few surviving red squirrels, “These charming and intelligent creatures never fail to delight.” But grey squirrels? Not so charming. UKSA has been investigating delivery methods for more than three years. In an East Yorkshire test last year,  researchers  added dye to the hazelnut bait that would cause squirrel hair to fluoresce in UV light. They were able to conclude that 90% of their test subjects visited the traps. UKSA is hoping to drastically reduce grey squirrel numbers without having to resort to shotguns or other lethal measures. Via BBC Lead image via Pexels

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UK plans to reduce grey squirrel population via contraceptives

A dome made of rearview mirrors, seat belts and soda bottles floats on Grand River

September 28, 2018 by  
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Husband-and-wife team Amanda Schachter and Alexander Levi of New York City-based SLO Architecture recently set afloat the latest iteration in their series of Harvest Domes — massive dome-shaped installations made from locally sourced, repurposed materials . Dubbed Harvest Dome 3.0, their most recent buoyant installation can be found in the Grand River of Grand Rapids, Michigan, where it celebrates the waterway’s heritage and role in powering the city’s manufacturing legacy. Measuring 20 feet in diameter, the colorful orb was constructed from a mix of surplus seat belts, rearview mirrors and soda bottles. Set afloat last month, Harvest Dome 3.0 was created for ArtPrize 10, a 19-day free event where artists from around the world transform three square miles of downtown Grand Rapids into an open-air gallery of art installations. SLO Architecture’s highly site-specific addition to this year’s line-up uses local materials harvested from the Grand River industry. Buoyed by a ring of 128 repurposed two-liter soda bottles, Harvest Dome 3.0 measures 20 feet in depth, 20 feet in width and 18 feet in height. “While the river’s energy propelled Grand Rapids to become a center for logging, furniture fabrication and automotive industries, the possibility of the river also engendered changes to landscape ecology, leading to flooding and contamination,” the designers explained in a project statement. “The transcendent abstract form of Harvest Dome 3.0 emerges from a flotsam of accumulated materials, its bright blue seat belt lines and sky-and-water-reflecting rearview mirrors shimmering like a bubble coming up from the surging rapids, transfiguring the river’s power and possibility.” Related: Beautiful Harvest Dome constructed from 450 found umbrellas wins the Dwell Vision Award A team of workers assembled the dome next to the Grand River over a series of days in late August. It was then lifted into the river by a crane and is secured in the water with ropes. ArtPrize 10 concludes October 7, 2018. + SLO Architecture Via ArchDaily Images via Scott Rasmussen / SLO Architecture; lead image via TJ Mattieu / SLO Architecture

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A dome made of rearview mirrors, seat belts and soda bottles floats on Grand River

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