World’s first silo brewery opens in abandoned NY grain elevator

May 30, 2017 by  
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Abandoned grain silos in Buffalo , New York have been given new life as a brewery. Buffalo RiverWorks recently opened the $2.2 million brewery as part of the revitalization of the city’s waterfront . Buffalo’s grain elevators have long been emblematic of the area but now could stand for a new era of innovation — both in brewing and architectural restoration. Once part of the Wheeler-GLF grain elevator, the old silos now house the Buffalo RiverWorks brewery. RiverWorks employees transformed the silos into a brewery with the help of local architecture firm Abstract Architecture and engineering firm Kromac Design . They had to cut through rebar-reinforced concrete to create the space they needed, and also added a second floor inside. According to The Buffalo News, they had to carry out the work without plumbing or utilities. Related: Buffalo’s Grain Elevators to Be Used in Large-Scale Narrative Lighting Display General manager William Casale of the Pearl Street Family of Companies, which is behind the brewery, told The Buffalo News, “We were able to salvage these silos to create what we think is the first brewery built inside a silo in the world.” Other efforts to revitalize the waterfront are also underway. Rock climbing walls were installed inside some silos, with an Escape Room and zip line slated to open this summer as well. An observation deck will adorn the top of one silo. Casale said they’re also thinking about setting up a silo distillery. Buffalo RiverWorks already hosts concerts, sports games, and other entertainment at their waterfront complex. Preservation Buffalo Niagara executive director Jessie Fisher praised the new brewery, telling The Buffalo News, “The grain elevators more than anything else in Buffalo are our defining image on the world architectural stage. We have the largest extant collection of them in the world. The brewery is perfect, because it’s that marriage of grain and the Great Lakes beer comeback happening in New York State with the push to have more local beer production.” Via The Buffalo News Images via Buffalo RiverWorks Facebook and Abstract Architecture

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World’s first silo brewery opens in abandoned NY grain elevator

Bangladesh raises storm danger to highest level as Cyclone Mora batters coastline

May 30, 2017 by  
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Bangladesh was still picking up the pieces after flash floods in April affected millions of people when a cyclone hit. Cyclone Mora just struck the country’s southeastern coast with rain and winds hours ago, and the BBC reports five people have died. Hundreds of homes have been devastated. As Cyclone Mora approached yesterday, the country increased its storm danger signal up to 10, the highest level, with warnings some coastal areas were “likely to inundated by a storm surge of four to five feet” higher than normal. The country’s Disaster Ministry told authorities to evacuate people along the coast. Hours ago the cyclone finally struck and is already damaging a country that grapples with cyclones every year. Related: Aussie surfer designs prefab recycled cyclone-resistant homes Bangladesh is home to around 160 million people, and around 10 million reside in coastal areas. The BBC and Reuters report that one of the areas that’s already been hit the hardest in Bangladesh is Cox’s Bazaar, where hundreds of thousands of refugees reside. Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar came to Bangladesh fleeing violence, but now many of their temporary homes have been destroyed. Community leader Shamsul Alam told Reuters in the Balukhali and Kutupalong camps nearly all the 10,000 thatched huts were flattened. Cyclone Mora started to form after recent monsoon rains which led to landslides and flooding in nearby Sri Lanka . According to authorities around 180 perished as a result. In Sri Lanka, around 75,000 people have had to leave their homes. Reuters described the Sri Lankan floods as the most widespread disaster the country has seen since the Boxing Day tsunami in 2004. Bangladeshi weather officials still said the cyclone wasn’t as bad as they anticipated. It’s supposed to weaken and become a tropical storm as it moves towards India, where officials have already warned of heavy rains in five northern states. Via the BBC and Reuters ( 1 , 2 ) Images via SSEC/CIMSS, University of Wisconsin – Madison and screenshot

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Bangladesh raises storm danger to highest level as Cyclone Mora batters coastline

6 abandoned grain silos repurposed into swanky modern homes

July 27, 2016 by  
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1. Midcentury grain silo home in Phoenix, Arizona Our favorite grain silo conversion project is this beautiful silo tiny home completed by architect Christoph Kaiser . Kaiser purchased the mid-century structure from a Kansas farmer and transported it to downtown Phoenix, where he reassembled and renovated the silo into a cozy 340-square-foot dwelling. To keep costs low, the quirky round home was outfitted with reclaimed materials and custom designs for a gorgeous interior. 2. Gruene Homestead Inn in New Braunfels, Texas If you’d like to stay in a converted silo home but don’t want to commit to the purchase, consider the Gruene Homestead Inn that offers temporary lodgings within a 1940s grain silo. Located in New Braunfels, Texas, the silo home features a one-bedroom loft apartment that can accommodate two adults and two children. For a southern touch, the designers combined the silo with an outdoor porch and decorated the gabled awning with a Texan star. 3. The Silo in Copenhagen Over in Copenhagen , the city’s tallest historic grain silo is getting a massive makeover into luxury housing. Danish firm COBE unveiled designs for a 17-story silo conversion that’ll feature 40 ultra-modern apartments. Slated for completion by the end of this year, “The Silo” will create a new kind of landmark for the city as the tallest adaptive reuse building in Nordhavn. 4. Silo Point Condos in Baltimore, Maryland Thirteen grain silos and a grain tower were converted into the Silo Point luxury condominiums in Baltimore city. Led by Turner Development , the adaptive reuse project turned the abandoned Baltimore & Ohio Railroad grain elevator—once the largest in the world—into a modern city landmark and mixed-use space. The silos’ industrial past is celebrated in the design, from the materials palette to the landscaping that harkens to its agricultural past. 5. Grünerløkka Studenthus in Oslo Luxury condominiums aren’t the only type of housing to come out of the renovation of multiple grain silos. In Oslo, HRTB Arkitekter AS transformed an old grain elevator with 21 grain silos into a 19-story student housing complex called Grünerløkka Studenthus . The architect spruced up the rather drab and industrial concrete exterior with colorful glass for a touch of whimsy. 6. Sil(o)houette in Løgten C. F. Møller Architects collaborated with Christian Carlsen Arkitektfirma to turn a large silo in the Danish town of Løgten into a “rural high-rise” with 21 high-end apartments. The architects left part of the silo’s body visible on the side of the new apartment complex to preserve a visual connection to the past, and built the protruding, colorful apartments around the steel structure.

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Morocco just officially banned plastic bags

July 27, 2016 by  
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When it comes to plastic bag consumption, Morocco is second only to the United States – but that’s set to change as the nation just officially banned plastic bags . A new bill enacted by Morocco’s parliament bans importing, selling, distributing, and producing plastic bags – but some worry it could take years for people adhere to the law. Morocco’s 34 million residents use three billion plastic bags every year, according to the Moroccan Industry Ministry. The country banned black plastic bags in 2009, however the motion was only partially successful as authorities had a hard time stopping “informal production.” Related: Scotland bans plastic bags, spares landfill 650 million bags in just one year Mamoun Ghallab, founder of Moroccan sustainable development group MakeSense , told Al Jazeera “They do it to promote the image of Morocco as an environmentally friendly country, which is partly true, but not completely… If citizens are not aware of the concerns and the challenges we’re facing, things will go much slower. Everything begins and ends with the citizens.” While Morocco is sometimes seen as a green country because of its focus on clean energy – the nation has built a massive solar plant and plans to reduce subsidies for fossil fuel companies – other sectors of the country aren’t so green. Waste is one issue; the World Bank said Morocco disposes of just 10 percent of waste in an “environmentally and socially acceptable manner.” Yassine Zegzouti, president of Moroccan advocacy group Association Mawarid , told Al Jazeera the government has made efforts to enforce the ban – including investing money in educational TV spots – but that the “formal sector” would likely need four or five years to adhere to the law. Industry Minister of Morocco Moulay Hafid Elalamy stated via Twitter there would be “several alternative solutions” to plastic bags, like fabric and paper bags. Via Al Jazeera Images via Zainub Razvi on Flickr and Esin Üstün on Flickr

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6 Awesome Repurposed Silos From Around the World

April 2, 2014 by  
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Some of the most beautiful designs we’ve seen over the years include stunning renovations of decommissioned industrial buildings . The most successful among these manage to keep the patina and grungy feel of the buildings’ former functions while infusing them with up-to-date design trends. The practice of repurposing silos , whose verticality offers architects a chance to create unique, otherworldly spaces, breathes new life into these aging behemoths and gives designers the opportunity to be playful. Hit the jump to see six of our favorite repurposed silos around the world. Read the rest of 6 Awesome Repurposed Silos From Around the World Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2013 Bi-City Binennale , bunker architecture , Chinese architecture , cold war bunkers , grain silos , green renovation , lighting design collective , O-Office Architecture , renovated industrial buildings , renovated power plants , renovated silos , repurposed industrial buildings , Shenzhen architecture , thomas heatherwick        

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6 Awesome Repurposed Silos From Around the World

Will the IPCC Report Convince Climate Deniers to Take Action?

April 2, 2014 by  
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Unlike previous reports warning of impending doom as a result of climate change , the recent Union Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report warning that global warming is here now and will get worse with nobody spared has actually garnered quite a bit of press attention. But does the increased attention actually make a difference in promoting action or could the simple act of presenting scientific evidence of climate change actually reinforce those already predisposed to climate change denial? Read the rest of Will the IPCC Report Convince Climate Deniers to Take Action? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: boomerang effect , Climate Change , climate denial , global warming , IPCC report , republicans , scientific facts , tony abbott        

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