The UK will require electric car chargers at all major gas stations

August 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Electric cars are expected to reach cost parity with gas-powered vehicles as soon as 2018 – and governments around the world are introducing new legislation and incentives to keep up with increasing demand. The UK just announced a new law that requires all major petrol (gas) stations and motorway services to install electric car chargers. The Automated and Electric Vehicles Bill, which was revealed during the Queen’s parliamentary speech, commits the government to improving the country’s electric charging infrastructure. It also requires that charging points be easy to access, work seamlessly across the UK and fall in line with the same set of technical and operational standards. As Auto Express reports, the UK’s public charging infrastructure is having a tough time keeping pace with EV uptake. In fact, a recent investigation reveals that electric and plug-in car ownership increased from 2,254 vehicles in 2012 to 85,983 at the end of 2016. At the same time, the number of charging points in the UK only grew to 11,736 in 4,243 locations (from 2,883 in 1,287 locations) during the same period. Previously, the European Parliament said there has to be at least one charger for every 10 electric cars on the road for EVs to become commercially viable. However, data obtained by charge point database Zap-Map shows that the ratio of EVs to chargers has grown from 0.78 to 7.32 in four years. Requiring all major petrol stations to install EV charging points is sure to further improve the car-per-charger-ratio. Related: GM is selling an electric car in China that costs just $5,300 Of course, it’s important to remember that it’s not just up to the government to install charging infrastructure. Says Steve Gooding, director of the RAC Foundation, “Ultimately, public investment in charging infrastructure will need to be matched by the private sector.” Via Auto Express Images via Pixabay

Originally posted here: 
The UK will require electric car chargers at all major gas stations

Debunking the 14 myths about why we should go nuclear

August 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Awaiting the DOE study on baseload generation, here are the reasons why energy efficiency, grid flexibility and renewables enhance low-cost reliability.

Originally posted here:
Debunking the 14 myths about why we should go nuclear

Supply chains, SDGs, subsidies and sustainability leaders

August 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

A monthly wrap-up of recent research on sustainable business and clean technology.

Go here to read the rest:
Supply chains, SDGs, subsidies and sustainability leaders

Could the U.S. benefit from a national green bank?

July 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Could the U.S. benefit from a national green bank?

Third time’s the charm for the Green Bank Act of 2017.

Read the original here:
Could the U.S. benefit from a national green bank?

India to ban driverless cars to protect citizens jobs

July 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on India to ban driverless cars to protect citizens jobs

By the year 2030, 25 percent of American citizens will transit via self-driving vehicles – but the situation will be very different in India. This is because India’s transport and highways minister, Nitin Gadkari, announced today that self-driving cars will not be allowed in the country. He told reporters, “We won’t allow driverless cars in India. I am very clear on this.” As Engadget reports, the statement does not reflect safety concerns. Rather, Gadkari rejects self-driving vehicles because they could potentially take jobs away from drivers in the country. “We won’t allow any technology that takes away jobs. In a country where you have unemployment , you can’t have a technology that ends up taking people’s jobs,” said Gadkari. India’s transport and highways minister added that the government is working on opening several training facilities across the country in an effort to ensure 5,000 more professional drivers take to the roads over the next few years. He rejects the notion of self-driving vehicles, even while admitting that India is presently short about 22,000 commercial drivers. Though the decision may seem like a negative development, India wasn’t on track to receive self-driving technology anytime soon. According to statements made by former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick and Google CEO Sundar Pichai, this is because the country’s haphazard roads and congested traffic present great barriers to the implementation of driverless cars. Related: Half of the World’s Consumers Trust Autonomous Cars, According to a New Study India-based Tata Elxsi is ambitious to introduce autonomous vehicles to the country, however. In recent months, the company has been testing self-driving vehicles on a track designed to resemble the country’s roads. Engineers have even gone as far as to install pedestrians, livestock, unsigned merge lanes and limited signage on the track to give the driverless cars as “real of an experience as possible.” With this new declaration by Gadkari, however, it is unknown what action the company will take. Via Engadget Images via Pixabay

See the rest here:
India to ban driverless cars to protect citizens jobs

‘Provocative’ RIG eco-lodge designed to conserve Louisiana’s vanishing marshes

July 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ‘Provocative’ RIG eco-lodge designed to conserve Louisiana’s vanishing marshes

The Louisiana Coastal Marsh loses a football-field-size of land every hour. Architect Robert Obier, who was raised in Louisiana, designed an eco-lodge for volunteers who want to help with restoration efforts as local groups – and even oil and gas companies – scramble to save this disappearing ecosystem . His design for The RIG, which stands for Restoration Initiative in the Gulf , caught our attention, and Inhabitat spoke with Obier to get the story behind its distinctive shape – which is reminiscent of an offshore oil rig . If nothing is done to preserve the Louisiana Coastal Marsh – Earth’s fastest disappearing landmass – it will be gone by 2050. Capitalizing on the growing trend of volunteerism, The RIG would offer accommodations for 26 volunteers, who would work on wetland restoration led by community facilitators. Related: Louisiana Flood Board Sues 97 Oil and Gas Companies Over Damage to Coastal Wetlands Obier is seeking LEED Platinum certification for The RIG, which will be comprised mainly of steel . Wind and solar power will help energize the building, which will also have its own water and sewer treatment facilities. Part boutique hotel , part research operations launching point, The RIG will be raised 25 feet above the ground, offering views of the Gulf of Mexico . The hotel will feature local Louisiana cuisine and will offer activities like kayaking and fishing excursions. On one hand, the industrial oil rig-like design is practical. Obier told Inhabitat, “Here the indigenous architecture that survives are the oil platforms. They’ve made it through the storms. And it’s a harsh salt environment down here that’s very hard on structures over time. From an architectural standpoint, if you ask, ‘What is the contextual architecture?’ That’s it.” But the symbol of the oil platform is one Obier hopes to reclaim through The RIG as well. He said, “As we try to figure out ways to save the marsh, oil companies are going to have to play a very important role because they are the landowners. They’ve had a lot to do with the problem, but they’re also doing a lot to try and save it as well. So it’s complex. I think the symbol begins that dialogue, and the answer to the question, ‘Why is it designed resembling an oil rig?’ begins to explain to people who are not familiar with our region what it’s really like, and how it really is an area where industry and environment are integrated for good or bad. The solution is going to be one that does not negate the fact that there is this interaction between the industry and the marshes.” Obier explains the marshes are disappearing in part because of the channels oil and gas companies dug to bring equipment in and out, but that’s not the whole story. The levee system, built in the 1920’s, has played a role as well. The wetlands used to be able to rebuild themselves, but now the Mississippi River prevents sediments from being redeposited, and the land is subsiding . Sea level rise from climate change has had some effect, but Obier said his understanding is if levels rise slowly enough, the area would still be able to rebuild itself if it were restored. Volunteers will be able to help with the work by planting marsh grass or trees. Obier said, “Marshes are not pristine wilderness. So it’s a very different kind of location for something you would call an eco-lodge, but at the same time, it’s still one of the most productive ecosystems in the world. It’s in big trouble, and we’re having to make a massive effort to try to save it, but it’s an extremely important ecosystem.” The RIG is crowdfunding on Kickstarter . You can contribute here . + Restoration Initiative in the Gulf + The RIG Kickstarter Images courtesy of The Restoration Initiative in the Gulf and via Wikimedia Commons

Original post:
‘Provocative’ RIG eco-lodge designed to conserve Louisiana’s vanishing marshes

46 Republicans join Democrats to protect climate change language

July 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 46 Republicans join Democrats to protect climate change language

Bipartisanship feels increasingly rare in the United States today, but a recent House of Representatives vote shows it isn’t dead yet. 46 Republicans aligned with Democrats on a vote over language about climate change in defense policy legislation , tipping the vote against an amendment that would have removed the language. It’s a small step, but one advocates hope points to shifting opinions on climate change among Republicans. Representative Scott Perry, a Republican of Pennsylvania, put forward an amendment that would have stripped defense policy legislation of language saying climate change is a direct threat to national security . The legislation in question also requires new analysis from the Department of Defense on climate change’s potential impact on the military . Perry’s amendment would have taken out the language calling for the analysis. Related: Cities rebel against Trump by posting climate data his EPA took down But almost 50 Republicans didn’t agree. The final vote was 185 to 234 . Of the Democrats who voted, all voted against the amendment. 14 representatives, a mixture of Republicans and Democrats, did not vote. During floor debate Perry, who is an Army veteran, said climate change shouldn’t be a priority for military commanders facing threats like North Korea or Islamist extremism, saying, “Literally litanies of other federal agencies deal with environmental issues including climate change.” He also said lawmakers shouldn’t decide the commanders’ priorities. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, a Republican of Florida, said policymakers should be “clear-eyed” about climate change. She pointed to sea level rise as a potential threat for military installations. And Elise Stefanik, a Republican of New York, said “we would be remiss in our efforts to protect our national security” by not considering climate change’s impact on the military. Republicans from both red and blue states opposed Perry’s legislation, including representatives from Louisiana, Ohio, Virginia, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. Via Axios Images via Phil Roeder on Flickr and Molly Adams on Flickr

Originally posted here:
46 Republicans join Democrats to protect climate change language

European Union walks a tightrope to climate leadership

July 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on European Union walks a tightrope to climate leadership

Will the rest of the West step up to fill the void left by the U.S. exit from the Paris Agreement?

The rest is here:
European Union walks a tightrope to climate leadership

How sustainability saves America

July 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How sustainability saves America

By taking on the cause of “global unsustainability” America can achieve its highest ideals while restoring its prosperity, security and environmental and social well-being.

See the original post here:
How sustainability saves America

‘Eighth natural wonder of the world’ may have been rediscovered after 131 years

June 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on ‘Eighth natural wonder of the world’ may have been rediscovered after 131 years

131 years ago, the eighth natural wonder of the world was thought to be lost in a volcanic eruption . The exact fate of the Pink and White Terraces at Lake Rotomahana in New Zealand was unknown, but now two researchers think the terraces may actually have survived, and could even be excavated to dazzle the world once again. During the mid-1800’s, visitors from around the planet came to view the Pink and White Terraces, pools cascading down into Lake Rotomahana. But in 1886, nearby Mount Tarawera erupted, releasing around as much energy as the biggest nuclear weapon ever detonated. Research hinted the terraces were either destroyed or pushed down into the depths of the lake. But independent researchers Rex Bunn and Dr. Sascha Nolden of the Alexander Turnbull Library think otherwise; according to them, the terraces may be preserved just 32 to 49 feet under the surface beneath mud and ash. Related: Scientists find evidence of lost continent beneath Mauritius Bunn told The Guardian the government of the 1800’s never surveyed the area, so we don’t know the exact longitude and latitude of the terraces. But the two researchers drew on unpublished 1859 survey data from 19th century geologist Ferdinand von Hochstetter to determine the German-Austrian’s location as he made his field notes to determine where the famed terraces might be today. They think the Pink and White Terraces may be in reasonable condition, able to be restored. Now they hope to begin exploring the site, if they can clinch funding. Bunn told The Guardian, “We want to undertake this work in the public interest. And I have been closely liaising with the ancestral owners of the land, the Tuhourangi Tribal Authority, and they are supportive and delighted with the work.” Nolden and Bunn aren’t the first researchers to think they’ve rediscovered the terraces. GNS Science New Zealand said in 2016 following five years of research, an international team came to the conclusion much of the terraces had been destroyed. But Bunn said he’s talked with GNS and that their conclusions may have rested on 130 years of incorrect cartographical information. Bunn and Nolden’s research was published online this month by the Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand . Via The Guardian and IFLScience Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Go here to read the rest:
‘Eighth natural wonder of the world’ may have been rediscovered after 131 years

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2819 access attempts in the last 7 days.