Google Street View captures the migration of millions of crabs on Christmas Island

December 11, 2017 by  
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Google Street View Trekker is traveling to Christmas Island this week to capture the migration of millions of red crabs . In what naturalist David Attenborough has described as one of nature’s “most astonishing and wonderful sights,” huge numbers of the iconic, endemic red crabs annually travel from their inland forest homes to the ocean, where the crabs breed and lay their eggs. The red crabs have already begun their march to the sea and the peak number of crabs on the beaches is expected on December 13, 2017. Dr. Alasdair Grigg of Parks Australia is working with Google and wielding a Street View Trekker 360 camera to capture images from the event, which should be available in early 2018. The red crabs of Christmas Island, an Australian territory near the Indonesian island of Java, spend most of the year burrowed in the damp forest floor to preserve body moisture and protect themselves from the harsh equatorial sun. When conditions are right, 40 to 50 million crabs emerge from their dens to march towards the ocean. Parks Australia has set up walls and fencing to help protect and guide the crabs as they maneuver around manmade obstructions, such as roads. Related: Google maps the solar system for armchair space travelers Although few are able to actually travel to Christmas Island to observe the phenomenon, people around the world will be able to witness the migration thanks to Google and Dr. Alistair Grigg of Parks Australia. “Christmas Island is not on the radar of most travelers,” said Grigg in a statement. “We hope people can get a taste of the magnificent nature and the red crab migration through the eyes of the Google Trekker. We also hope they are inspired to appreciate the world-class conservation values of the Island.” This documentation of natural phenomenon follows similar efforts by Google, including virtual tours of all of South Africa’s national parks . Via Mashable Images via Google

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Google Street View captures the migration of millions of crabs on Christmas Island

Weathered steel and reclaimed materials blend a modern home into the woods

December 11, 2017 by  
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Raleigh-based Tonic Design completed a creative new home that plays with the contrasts between the old and new in their use of reclaimed and contemporary materials. Tucked into the forests of Durham, the Piedmont Retreat is a 3,800-square-foot single-family home that embraces the outdoors in its use of weathered materials and large cantilevered windows. Reclaimed materials , like the oak flooring and factory lights, help soften the modern steel and glass construction. Located on a corner of a cul-de-sac in Durham, Piedmont Retreat is a two-story home commissioned by clients who wanted a low-maintenance home with a direct visual connection to their beautiful wooded site. In response, the architects wrapped the street-facing side of the home in vertical strips of Corten steel that will continue to weather over time and blend the home into the surroundings. Abundant glazing was installed in the back of the home to frame views of the forest. The home’s upper level is split into two halves, one for the communal spaces and the other for the bedrooms. This division of space is realized as two separate volumes set slightly apart and linked via light-filled walkways. A protected exterior courtyard sits between the two parts. Related: Stunning Lake Michigan home is built from dying ash reclaimed onsite “While the steel provides an exterior barrier, of sorts, between the family and the street, interior spaces are open and fluid, shifting perspectives throughout the house as the inhabitants move from the “public” volume of living, dining, and kitchen areas to the private volume of bedrooms and baths, all on one floor,” wrote the architects. + Tonic Design Images by Tzu Chen Photography

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Weathered steel and reclaimed materials blend a modern home into the woods

Worlds tallest hybrid timber building to boast Vancouvers most expensive new apartments

December 11, 2017 by  
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New details and renderings have been released of Shigeru Ban’s Terrace House , a collection of luxury homes in what will become the world’s tallest hybrid timber building. Developed by PortLiving, Terrace House will be set at the center of Coal Harbor overlooking the waterfront with condos starting at $3 million—which makes them the most expensive new apartments in the city. The 20 homes will be constructed as “individual works of art” with energy-efficient systems and wood harvested from sustainably managed forests in southeastern B.C. Modern in appearance and in the materials used, Terrace House is poised to stand out as one of the most innovative residential buildings in the world. However, the 19-story building also relates to and complements the historic site context through triangular shapes, natural materials , and terraces that echo the design of Evergreen , a decades-old neighboring building. Landscape architect Cornelia Oberlander, who had also worked on the planting design of the Evergreen building, was hired to work on Terrace House for continuity. “Terrace House has been thoughtfully executed and planned, drawing on Shigeru Ban’s iconic design codes to ensure that each of the 20 homes are individual works of art,” said Macario (Tobi) Reyes, founder and CEO of PortLiving . “The residences each have a full suite of smart home technologies, museum-quality glazing that helps to control temperature and provides UV protection for art collections, and fully-integrated air conditioning and heating systems paired with in-floor radiant heating and cooling that extend onto enclosed balconies, creating comfort and maximizing use of indoor/outdoor living spaces all year-round.” Related: Shigeru Ban Architects unveil plans for the world’s tallest hybrid timber building Each home in the Terrace House will be optimized for views of the city, mountains, and inlet and open up to terraces through electronic-controlled glass-sliding panels. Custom fixtures and features designed by Shigeru Ban will be installed through the building. Smart home controls are equipped in every home as are 27-foot-tall ceilings, as well as in-floor radiant heating and cooling. Almost half of the units will take up entire floor plates, while others will be split over multiple levels. + Shigeru Ban Architects Via ArchDaily

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Worlds tallest hybrid timber building to boast Vancouvers most expensive new apartments

Google Street View cars are helping scientists spot methane leaks

March 23, 2017 by  
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The Google fleet has been mapping cities around the world for years, making navigation easier for travelers. Now they have an important new responsibility: Google Street View cars will seek out natural gas leaks in urban areas. The data will not only help cities protect citizens from potentially harmful gas leaks, but also help cut accidental greenhouse gas emissions. The project was outlined in a new paper published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology . It’s a collaborative effort between Colorado State University researchers, the Environmental Defense Fund , and Google that involves attaching methane sensors to Google Street View cars. Related: Google Street View takes you inside the fiery depths of an active volcano The cars have been outfitted with special infrared lasers that can detect the amount of methane in the surrounding air in real time. Experiments found that the sensors had a range of about 65 feet, more than enough to detect leaks in urban settings where pipelines run beneath or near public streets. So far, the cars have found that there may be many more methane leaks in America’s major cities than previously believed. Cities with more modern pipelines were far less likely to have leaks, while Boston —the worst offender—was found to have thousands of leaks, resulting in a loss of about 1,300 tons of gas per year. Related: House Republicans move to make methane pollution great again While these aren’t necessarily a threat to public health or safety as long as the leaks are outdoors and natural gas can’t build up to explosive levels, they can wreak havoc on the atmosphere. Methane is far more potent than carbon dioxide, and leaks could seriously accelerate climate change if they aren’t addressed. Via The Washington Post Images via Wikipedia

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Google Street View cars are helping scientists spot methane leaks

Google Uses Street View to Create an Incredible Library of Global Urban Art

July 1, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Google Uses Street View to Create an Incredible Library of Global Urban Art Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , Google Street Art Project , Google Street View , green design , Street art , sustainable design

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Google Uses Street View to Create an Incredible Library of Global Urban Art

Google Street View Hack Shows Your Neighborhood on Climate Change (and it Isn’t Pretty)

May 8, 2014 by  
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Climate change is the most urgent issue of our time, but because it’s happening gradually, it’s difficult to understand how it relates to our lives and future. A new project called World Under Water aims to overcome this mental barrier by using a modified version of Google Street View to show what the world will look like if sea levels continue to rise as climate scientists predict. The result is a shocking wake up call that shows everything we have to lose if we fail to embrace a clean energy economy. Keep reading to learn more about what your neighborhood looks like on climate change, and what you can do about it. Read the rest of Google Street View Hack Shows Your Neighborhood on Climate Change (and it Isn’t Pretty) Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cities on climate change , Climate Change in Your Neighborhood , Google Street View , how does climate change affect me , rising sea levels , Water World , what does climate change look like , World Under Water

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Google Street View Hack Shows Your Neighborhood on Climate Change (and it Isn’t Pretty)

Half of World’s Coral Reefs Destroyed in Last 30 Years, According to New Survey

September 23, 2013 by  
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Half of the world’s coral reefs have been destroyed over the past three decades, according to a recent Catlin Seaview Survey (CSS). In a race to document their decline, the CSS teamed up with Google Street View and scientists from across the globe to compile the Catlin Global Reef Record – a free online resource launched today that is comprised of more than 50,000 high resolution images of the disappearing seascape. Read the rest of Half of World’s Coral Reefs Destroyed in Last 30 Years, According to New Survey Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: catlin global reef record , catlin seaview survey , coral bleaching , coral reef , coral reef destruction , css , global awarness , Google maps , Google Street View , Great Barrier Reef , habitat destruction , international union for the conservation of nature , NOAA , online image database , Scripps Institution of Oceanography , survey data analysis , temperature alerts , University of Queensland , world resources institute        

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Half of World’s Coral Reefs Destroyed in Last 30 Years, According to New Survey

Google’s New ‘Street View’ Maps Let You Dive in the Galapagos Islands!

September 13, 2013 by  
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Google has coursed the Amazon , swam the Great Barrier Reef and scaled the Burj Khalifa – and now the tech giant has launched their latest Street View Trekker project with a collection of incredible maps of Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands . Allowing users to become “Darwin for a Day,” the 360-degree street view maps swim with marine life and hike over islands that Darwin likely encountered in his historic venture 178 years ago. Viewers can even help with ongoing conservation in the region by identifying the plants and animals on screen. Read the rest of Google’s New ‘Street View’ Maps Let You Dive in the Galapagos Islands! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: catlin seaview , charles darwin , charles darwin foundation , converstaion , galapagos islands , galapagos national park , google conservation , Google maps , Google Street View , google trekker , iNaturalist , sea lion , Street View , street view trekker        

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Google’s New ‘Street View’ Maps Let You Dive in the Galapagos Islands!

Scientists to Use Google’s Underwater Street View to Better Understand Coral Reefs

August 20, 2013 by  
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The beauty of Google Street View is that it can instantly transport you to faraway places, giving you an on-the-ground perspective. Scientists in Australia have partnered with Google to produce stunning 360-degree panoramas of some of the world’s most impressive coral reefs . As part of the  Catlin Seaview Survey , those scientists are now studying the underwater images to gain a better understanding of how climate change is affecting sensitive reef ecosystems. Read the rest of Scientists to Use Google’s Underwater Street View to Better Understand Coral Reefs Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: catlin seaview survey , coral , coral reef , Google , Google Street View , Great Barrier Reef , ove hoegh-guldberg , Street View , streetview , Underwater Street View , University of Queensland        

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Scientists to Use Google’s Underwater Street View to Better Understand Coral Reefs

Sign Up to Help Capture Images of Remote Places with the Google Trekker Backpack

July 1, 2013 by  
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Google is calling on trekkers to help create street views of hidden corners of the world . Amateur explorers can now sign up to add their own contribution to Google Street View, with the Google Trekker Street View Backpack . Organizations like tourism boards, non-profits and universities can now show off their access to remote places by taking around one of the camera-wielding backpacks on their next adventure. Read the rest of Sign Up to Help Capture Images of Remote Places with the Google Trekker Backpack Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , Google Street View , Google Trekker Street View Backpack , green design , sustainable design        

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Sign Up to Help Capture Images of Remote Places with the Google Trekker Backpack

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