Climate change doesn’t have to be polarizing

June 21, 2018 by  
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30 years ago global warming became front-page news — and both Republicans and Democrats took it seriously.

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Climate change doesn’t have to be polarizing

Green steel: ArcelorMittal wants to disrupt environmental construction

June 21, 2018 by  
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Steel and mining giant unveils ‘Steligence’ approach rethinking life-cycle analyses.

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Green steel: ArcelorMittal wants to disrupt environmental construction

UN creates a new global climate change coalition

June 1, 2018 by  
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Earth has a “30-year window of opportunity” to tackle climate change, according to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) secretary-general Petteri Taalas. He called for greater urgency in carrying out the Paris Agreement as the leaders of the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) together with WMO launched a brand-new climate change coalition. Every year 12.6 million people perish due to environmental risks — air pollution in particular — and the group aims to lower that number. Average temperatures in 2017 were 1.1 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, according to the UN, while global average concentrations of carbon dioxide were greater than 400 parts per million (ppm). Taalas said climate change is impacting developing countries — the cost of natural disasters reached a new record in 2017. The three UN organizations already work together, but under the new coalition will strengthen action on guarding health from climate change- and environment -related risks. Taalas, WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, and UNEP executive director Erik Solheim came together to form the coalition and spoke to delegates at the World Health Assembly about opportunities and challenges to come. Related: 95% of the world’s population breathes unsafe air Air pollution is one such challenge. Around seven million people die prematurely each year from diseases related to air pollution, such as respiratory illness, cancer, heart disease, or strokes. According to the UN, in many of the world’s major cities, air pollution is higher than WHO air quality standards. Pollutants which threaten human health also contribute to climate change and damage the environment — examples are waste incineration or black carbon from diesel engines. The UN said lowering what they called short-lived climate pollutant emissions coming from agriculture, traffic, industry, or cookstoves, for example, “could help trim the rate of global warming by about 0.5 degrees Celsius by 2050.” Solheim said, “If we speed up on renewable energy solutions, fewer people will die from air pollution. Let’s create a pollution-free environment.” One of the coalition’s first outcomes will be a Global Conference on Air Pollution and Health , which will take place at WHO Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland from October 30 to November 1. + United Nations Climate Change Images via Depositphotos

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We could avoid 3.3 million cases of dengue fever each year if we limit global warming

May 29, 2018 by  
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Climate change: it’s not just about rising oceans. According to new research from the  University of East Anglia (UEA), action on climate change could help avoid millions of cases of dengue fever . If we limited global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius — a Paris Agreement target — we might be able to avoid around 3.3 million cases annually of the tropical disease  in the Caribbean and Latin America alone. There are around 54 million cases of dengue fever, caused by a mosquito -spread virus, in the Caribbean and Latin America every year, and approximately 390 million people are infected worldwide. But by around 2050, in a 3.7 degrees Celsius warming scenario, this number could increase by 7.5 million additional cases a year. While dengue fever is only fatal in rare cases, a specific treatment does not exist, and symptoms include headaches, muscle and joint pain, and fever. Related: Climate change could reverse all reductions in child mortality over the last 25 years But if we take action against global warming , we might be able to prevent millions of cases, according to UEA’s research, which drew on computer models and clinical and laboratory-confirmed reports of dengue fever in Latin America. Keeping warming to two degrees Celsius could lower cases by as many as 2.8 million per year by 2100, and keeping warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius could see an extra drop of half a million cases a year. Lead researcher Felipe Colón-González of UEA said, “While it is recognized that limiting warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius would have benefits for human health , the magnitude of these benefits remains mostly unquantified. This is the first study to show that reductions in warming from two degrees Celsius to 1.5 degrees Celsius could have important health benefits.” Co-author Carlos Peres of UEA said, “Our economic projections of the regional health costs of climate change show that developing nations will bear the brunt of expanding arbovirus infections, so a preventative strategy in reducing greenhouse gas emissions sooner rather than later is the most cost-effective policy.” The journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences published the research this week; researchers from Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso in Brazil contributed. + University of East Anglia Image via Depositphotos

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We could avoid 3.3 million cases of dengue fever each year if we limit global warming

Environmentalists want to sculpt an Arctic ice ‘Trumpmore’ to show climate change is real

May 2, 2018 by  
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Would the face of a certain climate change -denying president carved on an Arctic iceberg last for one thousand years — or melt? That’s the question an environmental group is asking. They aim to sculpt Donald Trump’s face in ice “to end the debate on climate change.” Environmental association Melting Ice aims to “build the biggest ice monument ever to test if climate change is real” with what they’re calling Project Trumpmore . Inspired partly by Trump’s alleged dream of having his face carved onto Mount Rushmore, Project Trumpmore aims to make his dream come true…but perhaps not in the way he’d like. They want to sculpt the president’s face on an iceberg with the anticipation the artwork would melt away. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); The plan is to build Trumpmore to match the size of the presidents on Mount Rushmore. Read more: http://projecttrumpmore.com/#s5 Posted by Project Trumpmore on  Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Related: ‘Trump Forest’ plants trees to offset the president’s climate ignorance Nicolas Prieto, Melting Ice chairman, said in a statement, “ Global warming is one of the most important issues and topics of today. There are still people who ponder whether it’s a real issue. We want to build the monument for all of us, so we can see how long the sculpture lasts before melting. Often people only believe something when they see it with their own eyes.” According to the statement, three young men “working in the creative field” are behind the project, hoping to create a concrete symbol with what they call their scientific art project. On their website, they said if they do reach the construction phase, they’d broadcast the process, estimated to take around four weeks, on a live feed. They said “a world-leading team of Finnish and Mongolian ice sculptors” would do the carving. There’s still a ways to go — the team estimates Project Trumpmore might cost 400,000 Euros, or over $478,000 if crafted responsibly. They said on their website they’ll work to minimize the carbon dioxide emissions generated from traveling and other work on Project Trumpmore, and are aiming to launch a crowdfunding campaign. They have yet to find a location for the giant face and ask if anyone knows of one to get in touch with them. You can find out more on the Project Trumpmore website . + Project Trumpmore Image via Project Trumpmore

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Environmentalists want to sculpt an Arctic ice ‘Trumpmore’ to show climate change is real

Amazing plant pods can grow more lettuce in a 1010 room than a farm can grow on 1/2 acre

May 2, 2018 by  
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Do you live in a tiny apartment and want to grow your own food ? Aggressively Organic has an answer. The Indiana-based company offers Micro Growth Chamber Systems that can grow more lettuce in a 10-by-10-foot room than an organic farm can grow on a half-acre. The systems use less water, too — a typical Aggressively Organic plant only requires watering once every few weeks. To feed the nearly 10 billion people that could be living on planet Earth by 2050, the Food and Agriculture Organization estimates food production globally will have to increase by 50 percent . The organization also said world hunger seems to be on the rise. Aggressively Organic seeks to tackle food insecurity one micro-garden at a time by giving people the tools they need to grow their own food – whether that’s in an office, dorm room or small studio apartment. Their growth systems are even suitable for people who lack gardening experience. Even cats can’t resist our delicious #BokChoy in our Micro Growth Systems. #hydroponics #AggressivelyOrganic A post shared by Aggressively Organic (@aggressivelyorganic) on Nov 7, 2017 at 7:31am PST Related: This hexagonal indoor farm grows more food in less space with 90% less water Aggressively Organic’s systems employ hydroponics in a simple form without filters or pumps. Their product consists of a foldable cardboard chamber, a liner, a coconut coir disc in which seeds are planted, reusable net cups to hold the plant, and a nutrient solution. There’s no electricity required, although growers can place their indoor gardens under a desk lamp if they can’t keep them in a windowsill. The system is extremely water efficient – it takes 25 gallons of water to grow a head of lettuce in the ground, but Aggressively Organic can produce the same amount of lettuce with 16 ounces of H2O. It’s really this simple to make a huge difference. Are you growing your own food yet? #AggressivelyOrganic A post shared by Aggressively Organic (@aggressivelyorganic) on Nov 8, 2017 at 4:42pm PST Aggressively Organic is currently manufacturing their systems and plan to begin a “Beta 2” round of orders this month. The company will offer different options of its Micro Growth Chamber Systems: a nine pack, which includes nine systems, 108 refills of seeds of your choosing and a grow light for $119; a six pack, with 72 refills and a grow light for $92; or a three pack, with 36 refills and a grow light for $74. Learn more on the Aggressively Organic website . + Aggressively Organic Images courtesy of Aggressively Organic

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Amazing plant pods can grow more lettuce in a 1010 room than a farm can grow on 1/2 acre

An adventurer just journeyed into Americas largest national park – and here’s what he found

April 30, 2018 by  
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The largest national park in America is one few have ever heard of, and even fewer have visited. Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve encompasses 13.2 million acres of glaciers and forests in the southeast of Alaska . Mark Jenkins, writer-in-residence at the University of Wyoming , decided to journey into the big unknown of the park’s landscape for Smithsonian magazine to capture what it looks like today, knowing that in 10 years, it would look entirely different because of  climate change . What he saw was absolutely breathtaking, in more ways than one. Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve is massive – it could fit Yosemite, Yellowstone and the entire country of Switzerland within its borders. But even though it is the biggest park in the country, it gets just 70,000 visitors a year. In contrast, Yellowstone gets 4 million. The park holds 3,000 glaciers, some of the largest in the country, and no one knows them better than the 250 residents of McCarthy, a bush down tucked deep in the park that isn’t accessible by car. Related: Alaskan city’s temperatures spiked so significantly NOAA algorithms thought they were wrong Jenkins met with some of the residents of McCarthy, and they showed him the changing landscape, giving him a once-in-a-lifetime tour of the glaciers and rivers that make up the landscape. “Bottom line, the glacial rivers are growing and the glaciers are retreating and diminishing,” Mark Vail, a resident since 1977 told Jenkins. “The Kennicott Glacier has retreated over half a mile since I first came here. Ablation has shrunk the height of the glacier by hundreds of feet in the last century.” Jenkins found the most obvious signs of these changes when he visited the nearby mining town of Kennecott. Photographs from Kennecott’s heyday a century ago show the massive Kennicott Glacier towering over the mill, but today the glacier sits below the mill. Jenkins talked to glaciologist Michael Loso while dining in McCarthy’s Potato restaurant. He told Jenkins about Iceberg Lake, which suddenly vanished in 1999. Loso explained that the resulting open land left by the lake allowed scientists to determine what the lake looked like even during warming periods in the past. The news was grim: “They’re an archival record that proves there was no catastrophic lake drainage, no jokulhlaup, even during the Medieval Warming Period,” he said. “When Iceberg Lake vanished, it was a big shock. It was a threshold event, not incremental, but sudden. That’s nature at a tipping point.” To read the rest of the story, and to view the astonishing photos that Nathaniel Wilder took on his journey with Jenkins, check out Smithsonian magazine . + Smithsonian Images courtesy of Nathaniel Wilder for Smithsonian Magazine , Google Maps and the NPS  

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The world’s tallest active geyser in Yellowstone keeps erupting – and scientists don’t know why

April 30, 2018 by  
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Something strange is happening at the tallest geyser in the world in  Yellowstone  park  – and scientists can’t explain it. Steamboat Geyser can shoot up to 300 feet in the air when it erupts, which isn’t often, but over the past six weeks, the geyser has erupted three times. Even though scientists may be baffled as to why the geyser has suddenly become so active, don’t panic. They don’t believe it is an indication that Yellowstone’s supervolcano is getting ready to erupt. ? The last time Steamboat Geyser was this active was in 2003. Normally, it can go a year or more between eruptions. The park is still covered in deep snow, but a brave visitor reported seeing the geyser erupt on Friday around 6:30 am. This is the third time it has erupted since March 15. Before that, it’s last major eruption was in 2014. Related: Scientists just learned what makes Yellowstone’s supervolcano tick Scientists say that there is no reason to think that this activity is an indication that the supervolcano that Yellowstone sits on is getting ready to blow. “There is nothing to indicate that any sort of volcanic eruption is imminent,” said Michael Poland, lead scientist at the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory . It could just be the “randomness” of geysers, he added. What would be concerning is if the hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone started drying up. That could indicate that the magma boiling in the volcanoes core was making its way to the surface. Via Reuters Images via Wikimedia and Deposit Photos

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The world’s tallest active geyser in Yellowstone keeps erupting – and scientists don’t know why

Earth Day Quiz #3: Exercise Your Eco-Muscles

April 18, 2018 by  
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Who was the first scientist to explain how global warming … The post Earth Day Quiz #3: Exercise Your Eco-Muscles appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth Day Quiz #3: Exercise Your Eco-Muscles

The largest fire in Greenland’s history warns of an extreme future

April 13, 2018 by  
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The largest wildfire in Greenland ‘s history burned bright last summer, a potential warning sign for a future rattled by catastrophic climate change . Scientists are concerned that Greenland’s massive ice sheet may absorb the black carbon smog produced by the fires, as well as by any fires that occur in the future. One-third of the ice sheet has been affected by the soot from the wildfire, which accelerates heat absorption and glacial melting. “I think it’s a warning sign that something like this can happen on permafrost that was supposed to be melting at the end of the century,” rather than the present, Andreas Stohl, senior scientist at the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU),  told Live Science . The fire burned about 90 miles northeast of Sisimiut, Greenland’s second largest city, and some suspect it was started by human activity. However, it is possible for  peat in oxygen-rich conditions to spontaneously combust, even when temperatures are low. In total, the wildfire burned about nine square miles of land. Of particular interest to scientists at NILU was the impact that soot might have as it landed on the ice sheets. “If you consider that Greenland has the largest ice sheet, apart from Antarctica , it immediately triggers some thinking,” NILU scientist Nikolaos Evangeliou told Live Science . Related: Scientists puzzle over subterranean heat melting Greenland’s glaciers Computer modeling enabled the NILU team to determine that seven tons of black carbon, approximately 30 percent of the total emissions produced by the fire , landed on the ice sheet . Ultimately, this amount of soot had a relatively small impact, less so even than that of North American wildfires that deposited soot across the sea to Greenland. Nonetheless, the fire may forecast larger ones in Greenland’s future. “If larger fires would burn, they would actually have a substantial impact on melting,” explained Stohl. Fires in Greenland potentially can also continue burning underground even when the surface fires have abated. “We cannot actually be sure that the fires (in Greenland) are out,” said Stohl. Via Live Science Images via NASA Earth Observatory

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