This alpine hotel is built with modular rooms stacked together

April 13, 2018 by  
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This minimalist and modular hotel in the mountain resort of Lenzerheide, Switzerland offers a streamlined and modern take on the traditional mountain chalet. Carlos Martinez Architekten designed Hotel Revier with prefabricated room modules, each with a glazed end wall and lined in natural, unfinished plywood. The long and narrow larch-clad building comprises three rectangular segments angled to follow the shoreline of the Heidsee and positioned to face panoramic mountain views. An exercise in minimalism, the sports-oriented Hotel Revier is “reduced to the bare essentials,” wrote Carlos Martinez Architekten. “The hotel unites the atmosphere of a mountain chalet with the liberating feeling of a campervan and the functionality of a ship’s cabin. All rooms face West toward the water and bring to mind the image of a VW bus: one park at the lake opens the tailgate and feels a sense of freedom.” Related: Hotel Tverskaya Transforms a Disused Building in Moscow with Sleepbox Modules The hotel’s communal core, made up of the lobby, bar, and restaurant, occupies the ground floor, while the four floors with a total of 96 rooms are stacked above. The 160-square-foot standard rooms, prefabricated and fully equipped offsite, were assembled into a metal framework. Each standard room includes a wall-to-wall bed that can be folded up into a sofa, TV, floor-to-ceiling window , hooks, narrow ventilation wings, a deep windowsill, and a heating unit for drying gloves and clothing. Hotel Revier also includes four barrier-free and 29 triple-bed rooms, also prefabricated. By stacking the modules side by side, the architects create a “double-wall” effect with the advantage of improved acoustic insulation. + Carlos Martinez Architekten Via ArchDaily Images © Marc Lins, Hannes Thalmann, and Revier Mountain Lodge

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Dreamy cabin is the perfect lakeside escape for large families

February 16, 2018 by  
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Montreal-based YH2 Architecture has given the traditional lakeside cottage a modern refresh in Window on the Lake, a minimalist timber cabin that derives its name from its stunning glazed end wall. Located just steps away from the shores of Lac Plaisant in Quebec’s Mauricie region, the gabled dwelling features a clean and minimalist design so as not to detract from its surroundings. The spacious family cottage sleeps up to 12 across two floors. Built of timber inside and out, Window on the Lake was designed to “capture the essence of cottage life” by creating a sense of warmth and connection with nature. The gabled building is clad entirely in white cedar that will develop a patina as it weathers over time. “The balloon frame, with its exposed wooden studs and joists painted white, gives the building a unique rhythm of shadow and light,” wrote the architects. “This is the cottage as an expression of the art of living: a gentle, simple, pure way of life.” Related: Decrepit lumberjack shack transformed into a beautiful retreat with minimal site impact The south facade closest to the lake is fully transparent to provide the open-plan living area with stunning lake views. The glazed gabled wall lets in sunlight and warmth during the cold months, while an extended roof overhang and mature trees mitigate solar heat gain in summer. Three large vertically oriented glazed panels punctuate the east and west facades to strengthen the connection with nature throughout the home. The cottage also includes two ground-floor bedrooms and a large, open sleeping area on the second floor. + YH2 Architecture Photo credit: Francis Pelletier

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Solar-powered Cottage in the Vineyard puts a modern spin on rural architecture

September 22, 2017 by  
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Ramón Esteve Estudio completed a minimalist mono-pitched dwelling that blends into its agricultural backdrop yet still catches the eye with its modern design. Located in the rural outskirts of Valencia, Spain, the Cottage in the Vineyard was designed to perfectly integrate into the landscape and features full-height glazing to blur the lines of indoor/outdoor living. The home also sits lightly on the landscape with its use of solar panels, natural insulation, energy-efficient lighting, and rainwater harvesting systems. Located between pine forests and grapevine fields, Cottage in the Vineyard marks a threshold between the cultivated and wild landscape. The house takes on a long linear shape made with a white concrete shell intersected by boxy thermally modified pine containers. Each pine structure features large glazed end-walls to frame views of the landscape. The structure is topped with a pitched roof in the image of a standard traditional rural house. Related: Vineyard House uses rammed earth to stay cool in Portugal’s hot summers “Environmentally, it follows the guidelines for a passive house ,” said Ramón Esteve. “Appropriate means are available to take advantage of renewable energy through the use of panels of solar energy, energy supply from biomass or collecting and storing drinkable rain water.” The Cottage in the Vineyard uses rock wool for thermal insulation. Cross ventilation is optimized through the home’s concrete spine. + Ramón Esteve Estudio Via Gessato Images by Mariela Apollonio

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Reconnect with nature in this gorgeous retreat built for slow living

January 24, 2017 by  
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A safe haven from the frantic pace of modern life has popped up in the Australian town of Balnarring. Melbourne-based Branch Studio Architects designed this lovely modern studio and retreat with a deliberately low-tech aesthetic that emphasizes connection with the outdoors. The simple yet chic home is extremely flexible and can adapt to a seemingly limitless number of uses. The client prioritized flexibility early on in the design process, requiring “a space that could be nothing one minute and everything the next, required to regularly and effortlessly switch between an empty nondescript shell of limitless possibilities to a fully functioning private residence.” Thus the Balnarring Retreat features a large open-plan space where furniture, such as the Murphy bed and desk, are built into the walls and can be folded down when needed. Storage is also hidden away in the walls to minimize clutter. The custom furnishings are made to be folded and unfolded by hand to promote mindfulness. Related: Rustic Off-Grid Pump House is a Solar-Powered Weekend Getaway in Australia The Balnarring Retreat also houses a kitchen, a study, and a bathroom. The north wall is fully glazed to let in natural light and frame views of the pond. The space immediately in front of the glazed north wall is a sunken ‘day bed’ that can be filled in with plywood boxes when extra floorspace is needed. + Branch Studio Architects Images by Peter Clarke

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Abandoned brick building is renovated into the beautiful Pinocchio children’s center

August 25, 2015 by  
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A new kind of glass could create nex-gen OLEDs and solar cells

August 25, 2015 by  
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Representative solar cell For a long time, one of the key defining factors of glasses has been their molecular randomness; but when a team at the University of Chicago , led by Professor Juan de Pablo, were analyzing a glass that they had grown in their lab they saw unusual peaks in “what should have been featureless optical data.” Initially they thought the peaks the result of an error in their calculations, but instead the team found that the particular technique they had used to make the glass had enabled them to control the organization of the molecules. It might sound like a small thing, but the capacity to tune the orientation of molecules in glass, which improves the density and thermal stability of the material, could be a breakthrough to improving organic electronic devices, such as LEDs and solar cells. Read the rest of A new kind of glass could create nex-gen OLEDs and solar cells

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