Sanya Farm Lab honors architecture, culture and agriculture

July 26, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sanya Farm Lab honors architecture, culture and agriculture

The new Sanya Farm Lab is a four-story exhibition space that provides 4,000 square meters of space for education, play and innovative ideas. It is located in Nanfan High Tech District of Sanya, the southernmost city on tropical Hainan Island, an area transitioning into a scientific and agricultural research hub. The Sanya Farm Lab reflects the surrounding area, where the government is investing in research around critical issues like environmental changes, land/water scarcity and food production. Related: ZHA designs sustainable expansion to China’s largest international exhibition center The multifunctional research compound and commercial display space features exhibitions covering high-tech advancements like agricultural robotics and indoor vertical farming . The goal of the project is to highlight agricultural advancement, a mission the building design honors by blurring the lines between indoors and outdoors. This is achieved through massive windows that stream natural light into the building as well as indoor landscaping and plants. In a press release, Beijing-based CLOU Architects explained that the structure was developed around platforms, stairs and shade. The focus began by detailing the outdoor public spaces first, with a well-planned cantilever on the second floor, which houses the organic restaurant and bar areas. The cantilevered design creates a rain shelter and passive cooling for the first floor below. Platforms center around the farm-to-table dining space, a theater and a children’s play area. Curved staircases connect the indoor and outdoor spaces in a nod to the curves of nature. The final layer is the deep roof grid structure, made of wood , that reduces sunlight absorption by 70% and improves energy efficiency. Natural ventilation is achieved by the design, too. The grid design pays homage to the traditional house of Hainan Li, embracing the cultural Chinese heritage of the area. Sanya Farm Lab is one of many projects by CLOU Architects. The team’s fingerprints on the project speak to their mission to “strive to realize projects that will positively influence the people involved in its process, the environment , and the communities who live and work there.” + CLOU architects Photography by Shining Laboratory via v2com

More here: 
Sanya Farm Lab honors architecture, culture and agriculture

ARCspace’s prefab homes are a quick and sustainable housing solution

July 26, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on ARCspace’s prefab homes are a quick and sustainable housing solution

The construction industry is responsible for considerable pollution and waste. Builders are leaning into innovative designs and material development to curb the environmental impact through sustainable architecture. ARCspace, a modular building developer, is one such business offering a solution for wasteful traditional construction, while introducing a host of other benefits. ARCspace is a division of Sustainable Building Council Ltd., located in the Los Angeles Cleantech Corridor. As a parent company, the goal of Sustainable Building Council Ltd. is to bring together experts in construction, architectural design, engineering, building, environmentalism and innovative technology who are all invested in addressing housing needs around the world, starting with the crisis in their own backyard, Los Angeles . Related: These prefabricated tiny homes are earthquake- and fire-resistant Prefabricated construction As part of this larger mission, ARCspace partnered with a variety of public and private interests to develop proprietary modular and prefabricated steel building systems. The mission is to work together to create efficient, affordable and long-lasting housing for a variety of needs that range from serving underprivileged communities to providing temporary housing. What began as a pilot program as a potential solution to the extreme homelessness crisis in L.A. has grown into several accommodation options ranging from 160 to 10,000 square feet. These units have been developed for residential and commercial use and as accessory dwelling units (ADUs). The structures are prefabricated for highly efficient and quick builds. The process also minimizes waste . In fact, the company reports the buildings are “spec-built from the ground up in 40-60% less time and cost than traditional construction.” Building materials In alignment with another Sustainable Building Council Ltd. goal to focus on sustainable architecture, ARCspace relies on high-grade steel as its primary material. Steel is a strong choice for durability, so the ARCspace units are built to meet and exceed California seismic safety requirements for protection against earthquake damage. The steel also makes them resilient in high winds and highly fire-resistant. In addition, steel won’t succumb to damage-causing bugs such as termites, and it’s a material that can be reused or recycled . Customizable tiny homes During development, the team at ARCspace collaborated with top innovators in the housing industry in order to follow the guidance of leading GreenTech companies. As a result, ARCspace units come with a variety of options customers can select during the customization process. This includes fun interior design elements like flooring, countertops, fixtures and paint. It also means optional elements that provide off-grid power and water. For example, some homes feature self-contained atmospheric water generators called Hydropanels that are grid-independent and pull a few liters of drinking water out of the air each day. Affordable solar panels are another add-on option. However, the primary supply still comes from onsite plumbing and electrical systems. The finished product provides all the comforts of home and the convenience of upsizing or downsizing with the addition or subtraction of units. Units can be linked end to end or stacked up to four units high with stairways connecting each unit. Avoiding toxins Although they look a bit like shipping containers, ARCspace pointed out critical differences. “We do not utilize or work with any form of used containers, not even 1-trip containers (those only used one time),” the company explained. “Shipping containers are manufactured with materials known to cause cancer such as LED paint, DDT wood flooring, and often have insecticide coatings, etc.” In addition to avoiding toxins in construction, ARCspace puts a focus on smart home features that are energy-efficient and healthy. The company employs a variety of sustainable technologies such as environmentally friendly, vegetable-based spray foam insulation and specialized window coatings that keep excessive heat out while allowing natural light in. It also uses recycled materials throughout, including for decking and outer cladding. Temporary shelters and emergency housing For temporary work sites or emergency housing needs, impermanent foundations mean the units can be relocated with minimal site impact . They can also be set up in as little as 24 hours once onsite with a small team using cranes to stack modules then following up with window installations. The company said, “Last year, ARCspace collaborated with Habitat for Humanity to create an Emergency Shelter Project in the San Francisco Bay area using America’s first prefabricated foundation and worked with local trade schools to help prepare a new workforce with an understanding of emerging sustainable building technology.” This quick-build housing showed the potential for ARCspace to provide affordable housing but also served as inspiration for those considering a career in green design. The ARCspace project was recently selected as a finalist in Fast Company’s 2021 World Changing Ideas Awards, a competition that recognizes “Buildings, landscapes, urban designs, and policies that make cities and living in them cleaner, more efficient, more beautiful, and more equitable for their citizens.” + ARCspace Images via ARCspace

View original here:
ARCspace’s prefab homes are a quick and sustainable housing solution

Amazons biospheres spring to life with first planting in Seattle

May 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Amazons biospheres spring to life with first planting in Seattle

Tech giant Amazon took a big step towards completing its incredible nature-filled biospheres last week. The company celebrated its ceremonial “first planting”—an Australian tree fern—inside the campus’ three giant geodesic spheres . The 11-foot-tall fern is the first of what will be hundreds of tropical plants to fill the domes in the heart of Seattle. Designed by NBBJ , the three steel-framed spheres are part of Amazon’s $4 billion planned campus that will cover 10 blocks of downtown Seattle when complete. Although the greenhouse-like biospheres will not have official office space, they will be filled with hundreds of tropical plants. Workers can use the space as a therapeutic outlet, which the company believes will help encourage employees to “think and work differently.” Related: Amazon’s biosphere domes are slowly taking shape in Seattle The giant spheres—the tallest of the three reaches 90 feet in height and 130 feet in diameter—will be set to 60 percent humidity and 72 degrees Fahrenheit during the day. The multistory glass buildings can accommodate over 800 staff and personnel. Over 3,000 exotic plant species are currently being incubated and tested for the spheres at a nearby greenhouse. The high-tech greenhouses are slated for completion in early 2018. Via Daily Mail Images via seattle spheres

More here:
Amazons biospheres spring to life with first planting in Seattle

Ship-like Hidden Pavilion uses the surrounding forest like a protective envelope

February 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ship-like Hidden Pavilion uses the surrounding forest like a protective envelope

This ship-like pavilion in Spain reconciles the openness of glass architecture and the need for privacy. Penelas Architects designed the Hidden Pavilion as a quiet retreat that protects its occupants not through the use of curtains or blinds, but by treating the surrounding forest as a kind of natural envelope. The pavilion is nestled in a forest glade just northwest of Madrid, Spain . Its isolated location allowed the architects to completely open up the building toward the surroundings and draw maximum natural light into its interior. Designed to become one with nature, the building incorporates an existing 200-year-old oak tree, along with younger trees, to grow through gaps in its terraced areas. Related: Kengo Kuma unveils “blossoming” glass and timber villas for Bali With a floor space of 753 square feet spread over two floors, the pavilion includes a veranda and a rooftop terrace that overlook the surrounding forest. Natural materials , steel and glass are combined to create a kind of industrial appearance of an ocean liner that, instead of oceans, navigates the lush landscapes of central Spain. + Penelas Architects Via New Atlas Photos by Miguel de Guzmán + Rocio Romero

More:
Ship-like Hidden Pavilion uses the surrounding forest like a protective envelope

Corby Cube: Dazzling Glass Pavilion Unveiled in England

May 26, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Corby Cube: Dazzling Glass Pavilion Unveiled in England

Read the rest of Corby Cube: Dazzling Glass Pavilion Unveiled in England Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: building design , Civic hib , Croby UK , cubic form , design awards , glass building , Glass Cube , HawkinsBrown , Multi-purpose building , Public Architecture , public building , public space

Here is the original post:
Corby Cube: Dazzling Glass Pavilion Unveiled in England

Giant Zig Zag Glass Canopy Envelops New College of Arts In Nantes, France

February 24, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Giant Zig Zag Glass Canopy Envelops New College of Arts In Nantes, France

Read the rest of Giant Zig Zag Glass Canopy Envelops New College of Arts In Nantes, France http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alstom halles , college of arts , Daylighting , eco design , franklin azzi architects , franklin azzi architecture , glass building , glass hall , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green house , nantes , natural light , steel frame , Sustainable Building , sustainable design

See the rest here: 
Giant Zig Zag Glass Canopy Envelops New College of Arts In Nantes, France

Gowanus Canal Sludge Could be Turned into Glass Building Blocks

September 10, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Gowanus Canal Sludge Could be Turned into Glass Building Blocks

Canals are notorious for being filled with industrial toxins, mud, tar and other forms of sewage that may potentially take years to clean up. The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn is no exception, and to clean the 300,000 cubic yards of miscellaneous sludge is expected to take the Environmental Protection Agency the better part of a decade.

View post: 
Gowanus Canal Sludge Could be Turned into Glass Building Blocks

Bad Behavior has blocked 11808 access attempts in the last 7 days.