Klaas Kuiken turns common green bottles into incredible vases with this clever trick

September 27, 2017 by  
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Dutch designer Klaas Kuiken has found a way to transform everyday glass bottles into incredible vases. He begins by wrapping wire around the bottles, and then he heats them up and uses an air compressor to inflate them into fantastic sculptural shapes. Kuiken was inspired to create his Bottles Collection , after being captivated by the small distinct details found in the mass-produced green bottles. He began to cut into the bottles and found that the thickness was different in most of the bottles. These little irregularities prompted the designer to turn the “flaws” into something uniquely beautiful. Related: Birdhouse Roof Tile: Cozy Nesting Site For Birds Brings Wildlife to Your Home To breathe new life into the products, Kuiken created a unique glass blowing system using a modified oven and a compressor. He begins the process by wrapping each bottle tightly with wire before placing them in his homemade oven. As the compressor gently blows air into the bottles, the glass begins to warp, bulging more on the thinner spots and less where it’s thicker. After countless experiments (some of which resulted in explosions and cracked glass), the designer finally achieved the right balance, resulting in beautiful, one-of-a-kind glass vases . The Bottles Collection has 17 different models – which were recently on display at the London Design Festival – and they can be purchased online . + Klaas Kuiken Photography by Masha Bakker

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Klaas Kuiken turns common green bottles into incredible vases with this clever trick

Ancient papyrus scroll offers insight into Great Pyramid of Giza mystery

September 27, 2017 by  
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Ancient Egyptians moved more than 170,000 tons of limestone to construct the Great Pyramid of Giza, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Archaeologists have long puzzled over just how they accomplished that feat, but papyrus rolls found by a French-Egyptian team offers some insight. In 2013 , researcher Pierre Tallet came across papyrus written by men who helped with the Great Pyramid of Giza’s construction. The papyrus was found in a set of caves used for boat storage in Wadi-al-Jarf, in a remote desert area. Tallet said in the Channel 4 documentary Egypt’s Great Pyramid: The New Evidence , aired this month, “Since the very day of the discovery it was quite evident that we have the oldest papyrus ever found in the world.” Related: Newly discovered Kazakhstan pyramid may be older than certain Egyptian pyramids Among the documents was the journal of an official never heard of before, named Merer. Tallet has spent the past four years deciphering Merer’s words, including his claim that stone was brought to the pyramids via boat – which adds up, since archaeologists found boat remains near the pyramids. Boats transported limestone to the building site via canals dug for that purpose along the Nile River. Then, according to IFLScience, the stone blocks were rolled on special tracks to arrive at the site. The limestone came from Tora, around eight miles away from Giza, and granite used in the great pyramid came from even farther: more than 500 miles south in Aswan. According to IFLScience, the same kind of boats that brought the limestone to the site could have been used to bring granite from Aswan. The Great Pyramid, Pharaoh Khufu’s tomb, was constructed more than 4,000 years ago, and is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World that remains intact. Via The Independent , IFLScience , and Smithsonian.com Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Ancient papyrus scroll offers insight into Great Pyramid of Giza mystery

Beautiful eco hostel embedded in the forests of Mexico is the ultimate off-grid idyll

September 27, 2017 by  
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Mexico’s beautiful Tosepankali Hostel is a peaceful haven for travelers that pays homage to the local indigenous culture. The eco hostel was designed by Puebla-based firm Proyecto Cafeína , and it’s actually part of a Nahuatl indigenous cooperative. The hostel was carefully built into the rugged landscape using locally-sourced materials like bamboo , stone, brick, and Bahareque – a traditional building material made of sticks and mud. The hostel is a recent addition to an eco-complex called Tosepankali, which means “Our House” in the Nahuatl language. The complex provides a variety of lodging options that are designed to “transport travelers into a new dimension”. The hostel is an incredibly peaceful off-grid retreat for anyone looking to get away from the hustle and bustle of urban life. Related: Experimental eco-hostel promotes Andean culture and Pachamama love in Bolivia The hostel was built completely out of local, natural materials such as bamboo, stone and brick. A large elongated roof extend over the building – and it’s the only part of the structure that is visible from a distance. The building is carefully embedded into the uneven topography, and it’s surrounded by natural vegetation that further fuses the hostel with its surroundings. The guest rooms and common areas feature an abundance of windows that provide stellar views and natural light. A large atrium at the center is completely clad with glazed walls built into the beautiful bamboo framework . + Proyecto Cafeína Via Archdaily Photography by Patrick Lopez

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Beautiful eco hostel embedded in the forests of Mexico is the ultimate off-grid idyll

See Chihulys dazzling glass art take over the New York Botanical Garden

May 8, 2017 by  
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A magical garden of glass has bloomed at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG). In more than a decade, world-renowned artist Dale Chihuly brought his breathtaking glass art installations back to New York with a major new exhibition called CHIHULY. With over 20 installations, the dazzling exhibition’s bright colors and organic forms are an incredible sight to behold—and even more so when illuminated at night. Unveiled late April, the new CHIHULY experience celebrates the artist’s process and legacy with over 20 installations as well as drawings and early works. The larger-than-life sculptures are seamlessly integrated into the garden’s many backdrops and include a new monumental work set within the Native Plant Garden water features and the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory Courtyard’s Tropical Pool. Chihuly’s artworks are all made from hand-blown glass , plastic, and water inside a Seattle workshop and draw inspiration from organic shapes found in nature. Their whimsical charm and dynamic appearance imparts an atmosphere not unlike the fictional worlds of Alice in Wonderland or Willy Wonka. The exhibition took two years of coordination between the NYBG and Chihuly. Related: Ray Villafane’s Crazy Zombie Pumpkins and Ghouls Return to the New York Botanical Garden The dramatic sculptures will be open through to October 29, 2017. The botanical garden also offers select Chihuly Nights when visitors can see the installations lit up in the evening and enjoy special performances, themed cocktails, and concerts. + NYBG Images via NYBG

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See Chihulys dazzling glass art take over the New York Botanical Garden

Fascinating Rapture installation explores the influence of sound on the human body

October 2, 2015 by  
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