Ice melt uncovers five new islands in the Russian Arctic

October 29, 2019 by  
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Five new Russian islands have emerged from the mass melting of glaciers and sea ice in the Arctic region. The islands were first spotted in 2016 by the Russian Navy via satellite imagery and were recently confirmed and mapped during an expedition this past August and September. Frequency of ice melt glaringly warns of climate impacts that are hitting harder and sooner than anticipated. Temperature changes stemming from global warming have adversely affected the Arctic. According to a September United Nations report , glaciers, snow, ice and permafrost are diminishing “and will continue to do so.” Similarly, Arctic sea ice has declined every month, “and it is getting thinner.” If greenhouse gas emissions levels continue to rise, the UN anticipates that around 70 percent of permafrost could be lost by 2100. Related: IPCC landmark report warns about the state of the oceans, polar ice content and the climate crisis Of the five yet unnamed islands, the smallest measures 900 square meters, and the largest measures 54,500 square meters. Their emergence highlights the UN’s warning that the period from 2015 to 2019 registered the most glacier loss of any five-year timespan. “Mainly this is, of course, caused by changes to the ice situation,” confirmed Vice Admiral Alexander Moiseyev, who was the expedition leader. “Before, these were glaciers; we thought they were part of the main glacier. Melting, collapse and temperature changes led to these islands being uncovered.” The new islands are located in proximity to the Vylki glacier , off the coast of the Novaya Zemlya archipelago, just northwest of the Russian mainland. Video footage provided by the Russian expedition revealed seabirds, walruses and polar bears already populating the islands’ shores. Interestingly, the shrinking northern ice cap has opened up sea lanes in the Arctic, making them more navigable. The discovery of these five new islands amidst the accelerated receding of the ice caps will therefore have geopolitical and consequent environmental implications, since the Arctic may well become, in the future, a much-contested highway and natural resource center of oil, natural gas , mineral deposits and even immense fisheries. Via CNN Image via Christopher Michel

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Ice melt uncovers five new islands in the Russian Arctic

The Ocean Cleanup reveals the Interceptor to remove plastic pollution from rivers

October 29, 2019 by  
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After recently announcing its first success at collecting plastic waste from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch , The Ocean Cleanup team is widening efforts by addressing the main entry point of litter — rivers. To tackle the 1,000 rivers responsible for about 80 percent of global ocean plastic pollution, the nonprofit has deployed a new invention, the Interceptor. The Interceptor catches and collects plastic junk, preventing its flow from rivers into oceans. “To truly rid the oceans of plastic, what we need to do is two things. One, we need to clean up the legacy pollution , the stuff that has been accumulating for decades and doesn’t go away by itself. But, two, we need to close the tap, which means preventing more plastic from reaching the oceans in the first place,” shared Boyan Slat, CEO and founder of The Ocean Cleanup. “Rivers are the arteries that carry the trash from land to sea.” Related: The Ocean Cleanup has first success collecting plastic from Great Pacific Garbage Patch Development of the Interceptor began in 2015. As the company’s first scalable solution to stop the river rush of plastic entering oceans, the device is shaped like a catamaran and houses an anchor, conveyor belt, barge and dumpsters. It operates autonomously and can extract 50,000 kilograms of trash per day before needing to be emptied. The Interceptor is 100 percent solar-powered and operates 24/7 without noise or exhaust fumes. It is positioned where it does not interfere with vessel traffic nor harm the safety and movement of wildlife. How does it work? The Interceptor is anchored to the riverbed at the mouth of a river flowing to the ocean. With an on-board computer connected to the internet, it continually monitors performance, energy usage and component health. Guided by the Interceptor’s barrier, plastic waste flowing downstream is directed into the device’s aperture, where a conveyor belt delivers the debris to the shuttle. The shuttle then distributes the refuse across six dumpsters that are equally filled to capacity via sensor data. When capacity is almost full, the Interceptor automatically sends a text message alert to local operators to remove the barge and empty the dumpsters. The plastic pollution will be transported to local waste management facilities, and the barge will be returned to the Interceptor for another cycle. To date, three Interceptors are already operational in Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam. The Dominican Republic will receive the next Interceptor in the pipeline, while other countries are on the waitlist. In the United States, Los Angeles is finalizing agreements for an Interceptor of its own in the near future. A single Interceptor is currently priced at 700,000 euros (about $777,000). As production increases, Slat has said the cost will drop over time. Of course, the benefits of removing plastic far outweigh the cost of creating the devices. Slat explained, “Deploying Interceptors is even cheaper than deploying nothing at all.” + The Ocean Cleanup Image via The Ocean Cleanup

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The Ocean Cleanup reveals the Interceptor to remove plastic pollution from rivers

Iceland will unveil monument for the first glacier lost to climate change

July 24, 2019 by  
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Scientists and local Icelanders will unveil a monument next month that memorializes the first glacier out of the country’s 400 glaciers to be lost to climate change. The Okjokull glacier, nicknamed “Ok”, no longer qualifies as a glacier, given that it is melting at a faster rate than it can expand. When this happens, glaciers become known as “dead ice”. Scientists in Iceland and Texas’ Rice University believe that this will be the fate of all Icelandic glaciers by year 2200— unless the world takes drastic action to curb climate change . “By marking Ok’s passing, we hope to draw attention to what is being lost as Earth’s glaciers expire. These bodies of ice are the largest freshwater reserves on the planet and frozen within them are histories of the atmosphere. They are also often important cultural forms that are full of significance,” said Cymene Howe, a professor at Rice University. Related:Earliest human air pollution detected in glaciers The unveiling celebration will be held on August 18 and attended by scientists, locals, media and Hiking Society members. Just 100 years ago, the glacier covered nearly six square miles and was over 150 feet thick. The plaque, located at a site where the glacier once covered, will read: “Ok is the first Icelandic glacier to lose its status as a glacier. In the next 200 years all our glaciers are expected to follow the same path. This monument is to acknowledge that we know what is happening and what needs to be done. Only you know if we did it.” The plaque is in both Icelandic and English. The plaque also monumentalizes the current count of carbon parts per million in the atmosphere, which reaches a record breaking 415 parts per million in May. “An Icelandic colleague said: ‘Memorials are not for the dead; they are for the living,’” Howe said. “We want to underscore that it is up to us, the living, to respond to the rapid loss of glaciers and the ongoing impacts of climate change. For Ok glacier it is already too late.” The Guardian Image via RICE University

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Iceland will unveil monument for the first glacier lost to climate change

Sheldon Chalet combines extreme engineering with luxury on North America’s highest mountain

March 7, 2018 by  
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Sheldon Chalet is a cozy retreat perched on the flanks of North America’s highest mountain in Alaska . Set on Denali at 6,000 feet in elevation, the Sheldon Chalet offers views of breathtaking natural surroundings while enveloping its guest in a blanket of luxury and comfort. The building is anchored “deep into the granite, iron and titanium of the Sheldon Nunatak” and it offers all the amenities of a luxury resort . It sits 6,000 feet above sea level, on a glacier just below the summit of Denali, and it’s accessible only by plane. Related: Handsome timber chalet shows off the beauty of modern minimalism Guests can enjoy views of the towering peaks and the night sky while sitting around a cozy fireplace or while waiting for their personal chef to prepare fresh Alaskan fare. + Sheldon Chalet Via Uncrate

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Sheldon Chalet combines extreme engineering with luxury on North America’s highest mountain

Rimac creates an electric supercar with almost 2,000 horsepower!

March 7, 2018 by  
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The name Rimac may not be that familiar to you, but that could soon change with the Crotian automaker’s debut of the supercar of all supercars. Unveiled with significant fanfare at the Geneva Motor Show , the Rimac C_Two comes with almost 2,000 horsepower on tap and a suite of other impressive features; it’s basically what all electric carmakers should aspire to create. The Rimac C_Two has four electric motors , two in the front and two in the back that generate a combined 1,914 horsepower and 1,696 lb-ft. of torque. With that much power at your disposal, you’ll reach 60 mph in only 1.85 seconds and a top speed of 258 mph. The C_Two doesn’t just impress with the amount of power it has on tap, since it can also travel up to 404 miles on the NEDC cycle, thanks to its 120-kWh battery pack. Hook it up to a 250-kW fast charger and you’ll be able to charge it up to 80 percent in under 30 minutes. Related: Tesla-powered 1981 Honda Accord accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds Rimac is also looking to the future, since the C_Two will be capable of Level 4 autonomous driving, and it’s packed with the latest autonomous driving tech, including eight cameras, 12 ultrasonic sensors, and lidar sensors. Even with all that power, Rimac describes the C_Two as a grand tourer. Open the butterfly doors and you’re greeted with a luxurious interior with three digital screens to provide all the information you need or want. There’s room for two and unlike most supercars, there’s even room for your gear. Rimac hasn’t announced the pricing for the C_Two, but only 150 units will be built. +Rimac Images @Rimac

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Rimac creates an electric supercar with almost 2,000 horsepower!

The worlds first ski-in/ski-out treehouse cabins open in Montana

January 8, 2018 by  
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As brutal weather continues to unload icy fury in the northeast, those looking to carve white powder in the Midwest may want to head to the world’s first ski-in/ski-out treehouses . Located in the winter wonderland that is Whitefish Mountain Resort, the newly opened Snow Bear Chalets let you ski straight up to the front doors, which are located 30 feet off the ground. The resort offers three magical treehouse chalets located on the Whitefish Mountain Ski Resort’s Hope Slope. The wooden structures are built 30 feet above the forest and offer stunning views of Glacier National Park. The ski-in/ski-out cabin are the first of their kind – and they’re the only lodgings located directly on the ski run just few steps from the ski lift. When ready to hit the slopes, guests can hop straight onto the white powder. When there’s no snow, nature lovers can get their fix either hiking or biking the mountain’s hundreds of miles of trails. Related: Green-roofed 2022 Winter Olympic center echoes the surrounding ski slopes The cabins offer the ultimate in a luxury hygge-filled getaway . Guests can spend days filled with downhill skiing in one of the most picturesque ski areas in the world, and nights by the fire with a steaming cup of hot chocolate. The treehouses offer extremely cozy interiors with fireplaces, large kitchens and large windows to enjoy the stunning views. The three cabins range in sizes, but are all equipped with large treetop decks and outdoor hot tubs, along with various luxurious features. And if you’re into stargazing, the cabins even come with turrets and ceilings covered in constellations made up of 600 fiber-optic stars. + Snow Bear Chalets Via Curbed Photography via Snow Bear Chalets

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The worlds first ski-in/ski-out treehouse cabins open in Montana

Scientists warn rapidly-melting glacier in West Antarctica could cause serious global havoc

October 26, 2016 by  
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As climate change fuels the melting of Antarctic glaciers , scientists have expressed grave concern. The UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and US National Science Foundation (NSF) will spend up to $25 million to research the colossal Thwaites Glacier, part of the West Antarctic ice sheet, which could dramatically accelerate sea level rise around the world if it melts. If the whole ice sheet goes, scientists warn global sea levels could rise by as much as nine feet.

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Scientists warn rapidly-melting glacier in West Antarctica could cause serious global havoc

Canadian nonprofit builds North America’s first urban earthship in Calgary

October 26, 2016 by  
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Since earthships make use of recycled and reclaimed building materials , they can be constructed at a very low cost. Grow Calgary’s volunteers began building this one in 2014, but their project was threatened after the city issued a demolition order due to code violations. After an appeal, the nonprofit won the right to continue and found ways to get the earthship to meet the city building requirements, thus earning proper permits. Scottie Davidson of EcoNerds led a renewed effort this past summer to complete the construction, and the team is almost at the finish line. Related: Earthships heading to Canada will provide First Nations communities with low-income housing Due to their partially subterranean design, earthships are ultra energy efficient . Being partly underground greatly reduces the need for artificial heating and cooling by taking advantage of the earth’s steady temperatures, which is also the feature that makes an earthship a wonderful spot for a greenhouse. Many earthships, like this one, can also eschew artificial lighting, thanks to abundant windows that also help draw in warmth from the sun. With walls made from old tires, beer cans, and other trash-turned-treasure, Grow Calgary’s earthship greenhouse will be open to the public once it’s complete, and crops grown in the greenhouse will (like the rest of the urban farm’s yield) be donated to the Calgary Food Bank. The earthship sits on the organization’s 11-acre plot that is already home to traditional crops. Adding the greenhouse will unlock the key to year-round production, even in Calgary’s long, frigid winter. Via Calgary Herald Images via Grow Calgary

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Canadian nonprofit builds North America’s first urban earthship in Calgary

Capsized iceberg resembles a sapphire in the Southern Ocean

February 2, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Capsized iceberg resembles a sapphire in the Southern Ocean Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alex Cornell , Antarctic ocean , Antarctica climate change , antarctica flipped glacier , Antarctica Glaciers , antarctica trip , blue glacier , capsized glacier , Climate Change , flipped glaciers , glacier , glacier flipping , iceberg , icebergs , jewel glacier , jewel iceberg , ocean , ocean jewel , Photographer Alex Cornell

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Capsized iceberg resembles a sapphire in the Southern Ocean

200-year-old stone structure hides a modern and minimalist summer home in Switzerland

February 2, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of 200-year-old stone structure hides a modern and minimalist summer home in Switzerland Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Buchner Bründler Architekten , concrete , fireplace , green renovation , holiday home , house inside a house , house within a house , Linescio , Linescio house , minimalist , natural cooling , summer home , Switzerland

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200-year-old stone structure hides a modern and minimalist summer home in Switzerland

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