Century-old Iowa warehouse is transformed into LEED Platinum offices

August 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Century-old Iowa warehouse is transformed into LEED Platinum offices

Des Moines-based Neumann Monson Architects has breathed new life into a historic industrial warehouse in Iowa by transforming the 117-year-old building into LEED Platinum multi-tenant offices. Commissioned by Blackbird Investments, this eco-friendly renovation not only involved salvaging and reusing original elements in the century-old building, but also inserting energy efficient systems including a combination of geothermal and solar that have helped the project achieve net-zero energy certification. Dubbed Market One, the thoughtfully restored structure has sparked greater revitalization in the surrounding industrial neighborhood and is the state’s first commercial building to produce more energy than it consumes. Completed in 2015, Market One comprises 55,000 square feet of renovated warehouse space in addition to 1,887 square feet of added construction. Originally built in 1901 as the offices and manufacturing center for the Advance-Rumely Thresher Company, the warehouse comprises three main floors as well as a basement. While renovating the building, Neumann Monson Architects also added a rooftop office and deck. The block immediately east of the building was converted into a surface parking lot with an overhead photovoltaic canopy. Related: LEED Platinum housing for the homeless takes over a formerly vacant L.A. lot “The project achieves a rich, nuanced dialogue between new and old,” Neumann Monson Architects said. “In some locations, the two are carefully delineated. In others, modern interventions blend in and take a backseat to historic character. Throughout the building, transparency and compatible finishes allow space to flow freely. To maintain the large volumes’ spatial continuity, the design locates new enclosed areas at the building’s core and terminates their walls well below the ceiling plane. Extensive glass and polycarbonate interior partitions allow light penetration deep into the building and maintain open visual connection throughout each floor level.” Local, sustainable and durable materials were used throughout Market One. A planned green belt and pedestrian trail will soon be added to the north of the building and a new Amtrak station will also be added in the future. + Neumann Monson Architects Via Dezeen Images via Cameron Campbell

The rest is here: 
Century-old Iowa warehouse is transformed into LEED Platinum offices

This modular family home has its own indoor pond

August 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This modular family home has its own indoor pond

When a young family shops for a home , they often want a simple floor plan and open spaces for kids to play and for parents to relax and entertain. This low-profile home, designed by Adolfo Mondejar Arquitectos and located in an outer neighborhood of Cordoba, Spain , is logically configured and easily adaptable to the ever-evolving requirements of a family over the years. The design caters to the natural sunlight and cool breezes of the area, with windows all around and a spacious yard, decks, and balconies for fun and play. The home connects to the surrounding outdoor spaces, which are are wide open and ideal for residents who want to experience the environment, whether through bike riding, picnicking or simply taking a stroll. Related: This striking, bright-red modular home connects to its surroundings through contrast The interior flows from one space to the next, with long hallways flanked with bedrooms and bathrooms. Playful colors and names on the bathroom doors add whimsy and and a personal touch to the atmosphere. Rich brown paneling in the hallways gives the interior a warm, inviting feeling. A large terrace at the top of the staircase, built from two concrete walls and topped with a rustic slab of exposed concrete , provides an ideal venue for large parties as well as small family gatherings. Walls covered with quebracho wood add warmth to bathrooms and pivotal use spaces. All the rooms are comprised of an aesthetically balanced combination of wood , concrete and glass, with smooth, finished concrete floors. The home relies on sunlight for natural heat and daily breezes to cool it down . In a unique twist, the minimalist home includes a pond in the master bedroom, which further brings the outdoors in and promotes feelings of peace and tranquility. A particularly sunny spot in the living room has vines sprawling in all directions, another feature that gives the home a feel of nature, energy, life and sustenance. + Adolfo Mondejar – Estudio de Arquitectos Images by Gonzalo Viramonte

Read more: 
This modular family home has its own indoor pond

Inside Kathy Hannun’s quest to provide accessible household geothermal energy

May 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Inside Kathy Hannun’s quest to provide accessible household geothermal energy

It’s about the consumer-friendly product, yes, but for this ex-Googler, it’s especially about the right employees.

Read the original post:
Inside Kathy Hannun’s quest to provide accessible household geothermal energy

Colorado meth lab transformed into a minimalist artist retreat with rammed earth walls

April 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Colorado meth lab transformed into a minimalist artist retreat with rammed earth walls

A former meth lab in North Boulder, Colorado has received a new lease on life as an artist retreat with a beautifully minimalist design. Denver-based tres birds workshop designed the Swoon Art House with a careful eye on environmental stewardship, using “100 percent renewable resources” including rammed earth walls and geothermal wells. Created as part of the Swoon/ Boulder Museum Contemporary Art International Artists Residency , the 7,000-square-foot Swoon Art House merges forward-thinking design and technology with ancient construction techniques. Designed like a sculpture in itself, the artist retreat features two long structures set at an angle to one another. Round metal roofs top the building and contrast with the 30-inch-thick rammed earth walls created using soil from the site. Four vertical geothermal wells power the building’s heating and cooling system. Related: Tattoo shop-turned-distillery renovated using materials reclaimed on-site The first building houses two lofted bedrooms with bathrooms and a full kitchen for artists in residency. A small glass-walled passageway leads to the second building, which serves as an art studio. Energy-conserving windows line the studio walls, while hidden storage spaces add to the clean, minimalist feel. “The structure, from the physical design to the flow of energy, is based on the circle,” the architecture firm said. “The circle holds particular significance in ancient and modern culture, symbolizing that which is without a beginning or an end.” + tres birds workshop

Originally posted here:
Colorado meth lab transformed into a minimalist artist retreat with rammed earth walls

Even NASA isn’t quite sure how to explain these holes in the Arctic Sea’s ice

April 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Even NASA isn’t quite sure how to explain these holes in the Arctic Sea’s ice

Can you identify the holes in the sea ice pictured above? If so, let NASA know. They recently posted the image, snapped over the Beaufort Sea, as the April 2018 Puzzler on their “Earth Matters” blog. They aren’t quite sure what caused them, although they ventured a few ideas, including heat, thin ice, and even rogue seals. NASA Operation IceBridge mission scientist John Sonntag captured the baffling image from a P-3 research plane soaring over the eastern Beaufort Sea. Sonntag had never seen holes like this before; writing from the field, he said, “We saw these sorta-circular features only for a few minutes today. I don’t recall seeing this sort of thing elsewhere.” Related: The first salty lakes discovered in the Arctic could hold the key to finding alien life Before the agency revealed that the photo was from the Arctic , Internet users offered plenty of guesses as to its location – from fires in Oklahoma to the surface of Mars. User Scott Stensland came close when he guessed the circles were open water holes in ice created by ocean mammals, such as seals . Indeed, that’s similar to one answer NASA has come up with: the holes bear a resemblance to photographs of breathing holes harp seals and ring seals have created. National Snow and Ice Data Center scientist Walt Meier told NASA, “The encircling features may be due to waves of water washing out over the snow and ice when the seals surface. Or it could be a sort of drainage feature that results from when the hole is made in the ice.” Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory sea ice scientist Chris Polashenski told NASA he’d glimpsed features like these holes in the past. Seals could offer one answer; another is convection. University of Maryland at Baltimore County glaciologist Chris Shuman, who’s based at the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center, told NASA, “This is in pretty shallow water generally, so there is every chance this is just ‘warm springs’ or seeps of ground water flowing from the mountains inland that make their presence known in this particular area. The other possibility is that warmer water from Beaufort currents or out of the Mackenzie River is finding its way to the surface due to interacting with the bathymetry , just the way some polynyas form.” + NASA Earth Observatory + Curious Circles in Arctic Sea Ice Images via John Sonntag/Operation IceBridge/NASA and NASA/Joe MacGregor

Excerpt from:
Even NASA isn’t quite sure how to explain these holes in the Arctic Sea’s ice

Steven Holl Architects unveils designs for geothermal-powered Angers Collectors Museum

March 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Steven Holl Architects unveils designs for geothermal-powered Angers Collectors Museum

Steven Holl Architects and Compagine de Phalsbourg have won an international design competition for the new Angers Collectors Museum (Le Musée des Collectionneurs) and hotel in the heart of Angers , France. Envisioned as a new cultural gateway, the sculptural museum is undeniably modern yet pays homage to its historic settings and derives inspiration from the nearby historic Chateau d’Angers located across the river. Geothermal heating and cooling will be used in the museum to reduce the building’s energy footprint. Built of exposed titanium white concrete, the 4,742-square-meter museum has a striking sculptural appearance that will be set within a series of reflecting pools—filled with recycled water—in a nod to the site’s riverine history. The museum will be connected to a linear hotel clad in clear and translucent glass for a mosaic-like effect inspired by the 14th century Apocalypse Tapestry on display in Chateau d’Angers. Related: Gigantic Slugs Made From 40,000 Recycled Plastic Bags Crawl Through the Streets of Angers, France In addition to the museum and hotel’s prime riverside location on the east bank of the Maine River, their proximity to Le Quai, the city’s largest theater , further cements the buildings’ future as the cultural heart in Angers. The museum will share a rooftop restaurant with the hotel as well as a public sculptural garden at the ground level. + Steven Holl Architects Images via Steven Holl Architects

Read more from the original source:
Steven Holl Architects unveils designs for geothermal-powered Angers Collectors Museum

Geothermal-powered Halifax home uses automation for energy savings

January 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Geothermal-powered Halifax home uses automation for energy savings

Omar Gandhi Architect completed a handsome luxury home in Halifax that’s both modern in appearance and in its use of energy-efficient technologies. Located in the south end of Halifax, Nova Scotia, the Syncline House is a two-story residence with a mezzanine set atop a rocky foundation that inspired the home’s name. Energy efficiency was a major feature of the new-build, from the ample natural lighting and triple-glazed windows to the use of geothermal and solar energy. Set atop a concrete base, Syncline House comprises two interconnected volumes connected via a light-filled atrium and clad in textured Fibre-C panels, a type of lightweight white fiber-cement panel that boasts fire resistance and long-term durability. The taller of the two volumes houses the communal areas like the open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen on the main floor and a media room and gym on the ground floor. The second volume contains a master ensuite, office, and dressing room on the main floor and a garage on the ground floor. A guest bedroom is placed on the mezzanine level. Related: Artists’ Wooden Cabin Climbs Up a Hillside in Nova Scotia Full-height triple-glazed windows frame stunning views of Point Pleasant Park next door and the ocean waters of the North-West Arm beyond. The homeowners can also enjoy the view from west-facing walkout decks that extend from the living room and from the master bedroom. The airy and light-filled interior features wide white oak flooring, whitewashed walls, and floor-to-ceiling header-less doors. Rooftop solar panels and geothermal heat pumps power the home that uses automated blinds and recessed windows on the southwest facade for passive cooling. + Omar Gandhi Architect Via ArchDaily Images via Omar Gandhi Architect

Read more here: 
Geothermal-powered Halifax home uses automation for energy savings

Worlds first negative emissions power plant opens in Iceland

October 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Worlds first negative emissions power plant opens in Iceland

Go, Iceland! On Wednesday, the nation flipped the switch on the world’s first power plant that eliminates more CO2 than it produces. The pilot program, which is operated by Climeworks , can remove an estimated 50 metric tons of CO2 from the air each year. The gases aren’t just contained; rather, they are turned into limestone where they will remain for at least one million years. The process works by capturing the CO2 from ambient air using Climeworks’ patented filter. The geothermal power plant then heats up the filter using low-grade heat; this extracts pure carbon dioxide . The gases are then bound to water and sent 700 meters deep into the ground. When CO2 reacts with basaltic bedrock, it forms a permanent solid mineral. Quartz reports that by burying the harmful greenhouse gases in rock, the odorless gas is prevented from being released for at least one million years. The project is still in its pilot stage, but scientists with Climeworks are optimistic that similar negative emissions plants could be rolled out across the globe. There are some challenges to this vision, however. The process isn’t exactly cheap, for instance. Climeworks estimates that it costs $600 to extract just one ton of CO2 from the air. Related: Midwest greenhouse heated with geothermal energy produces citrus year-round for $1 per day By the end of 2017, the full capacity of the plant is expected to be 900 tonnes per year — but that’s only the equivalent of the annual emissions of 45 American people. Nonetheless, the company remains hopeful that this is the beginning. Said Christoph Gebald, the founder and CEO of Climeworks, “The potential of scaling-up our technology in combination with CO2 storage, is enormous.” By 2025, the company seeks to cut costs to $100 a tonne and capture 1 percent of man-made carbon emissions each year. There are no details on how this will be accomplished, but with investors such as Bill Gates and the European Space Agency throwing money into research for “direct air capture,” it could be accomplished. Of course, it’s still important — now more than ever — that the general populace adopts sustainable habits , as data from the UN shows that humans are far from reaching the 2 degrees Celsius limit set by the Climate Agreement. + Climeworks Via Quartz Images via Climeworks , Arni Saeberg , Sandra O Snaebjornsdottir

Read more here:
Worlds first negative emissions power plant opens in Iceland

How the upcoming solar eclipse will affect 7 million homes and businesses

August 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How the upcoming solar eclipse will affect 7 million homes and businesses

A total solar eclipse will block sunlight from reaching parts of the Earth for an estimated three hours on August 21. As a result, at least 7 million U.S. homes and businesses that rely on solar power will be directly affected. But there’s no reason to be nervous: electric grid and skilled operators are well-prepared. A total solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon which occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun . Though it will disrupt solar generation during times of peak generation, the event is not one to fear. According to Julia Prochnik , the Director of Western Renewable Grid Planning, people will not notice any change in their electrical service as electric grid operators across the country have made appropriate preparations. The last time citizens in the U.S. glimpsed a solar eclipse was in 1979, when solar energy was in its infancy. In the time that has passed, the energy system has changed significantly. Wind and solar energy are now the fastest-growing sources of renewable electricity in the U.S. Prochnik says that some states will see a larger drop in solar power than others; it all depends on how much the sun is blocked by the moon in their specific location. Fortunately, there are plenty of energy resources available to “fill the gap,” and they include geothermal , wind and hydropower. Related: Coming Total Solar Eclipse to be an ‘event of the century’, scientists say NASA reports that the solar eclipse will block a 70-mile-wide path stretching from Oregon to South Carolina. The longest period of total darkening will be about two minutes and 40 seconds. Nationwide, the moon will still block at least a portion of the sun. At any one spot, the longest period of partial darkness may last three hours. Arizona can expect to experience a brief interruption in 70 percent of its rooftop solar generation. New York follows with 68 percent, Utah can expect a 39 percent, and Nevada a 24 percent interruption. California and North Carolina may experience the biggest impacts from the eclipse, as they are both major solar producers. The difference can be compensated by reducing energy use and/or by temporarily drawing electricity from the grid. A few things environmentally-conscious individuals can do to prepare for the eclipse is replace all light bulbs with LEDs , turn off lights, unplug chargers and appliances, and turn down their thermostats. All of these steps will help save energy and reduce load grid pressure. All in all, the celestial event is one to celebrate, as it is one few will likely witness again. Via NRDC Images via Pixabay

See the rest here:
How the upcoming solar eclipse will affect 7 million homes and businesses

Affordable home geothermal energy systems come to upstate New York

July 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Affordable home geothermal energy systems come to upstate New York

When you think of home renewable power systems, geothermal energy probably isn’t the first source that springs to mind. But new company Dandelion , which starts after time at Google’s moonshot factory X , aims to power houses with the clean , free source “right under our feet.” They’re offering their systems beginning in northeastern America. The Dandelion team launched their company independent of Alphabet this month, offering geothermal heating and cooling for homes. They come in and replace cooling, heating, and hot water equipment with their geothermal systems, including underground pipes and a heat pump, which gather energy from the earth. The company describes geothermal cooling and heating as the most efficient method of such climate control for the home. Related: St. Patrick’s Cathedral unveils state-of-the-art geothermal plant Affordability was one of Dandelion’s main goals. They say many homes haven’t yet adopted geothermal systems due to the hefty cost associated with setup. In contrast, Dandelion’s system costs $20,000. On their website they say they’ve partnered with a leading financing company to install the systems with zero costs upfront followed by low monthly payments. The company also designed a better drill to install the systems. In the past, geothermal systems were installed with a wide drill that was intended for water wells more than 1,000 feet into the ground. The Dandelion team designed a slender drill that can create one or two deep holes a few inches wide – with less waste. Their new drill lets them put in ground loops in under one day. Overall, putting in their geothermal systems takes two to three days. Dandelion’s heat pumps will last around 25 years, while the closed-loop piping can last for a minimum of 50. The system comes with a smart thermostat enabling homeowners to regulate the temperature inside. The team is starting with 11 counties in New York – they say regions with cold winters and hot summers are ideal for home geothermal systems. + Dandelion Via Kathy Hannun on Medium Images via Dandelion Facebook and Dandelion

See the original post:
Affordable home geothermal energy systems come to upstate New York

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1605 access attempts in the last 7 days.