Adam Bumpus, Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne, on innovation and blockchain

June 29, 2018 by  
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Adam Bumpus, Senior Research Fellow at the School of Geography at the University of Melbourne, talks his excitement about how accelerators can spur innovation and startups’ technologies, opening new sustainable business models. He also discusses how blockchain can aid the energy revolution.

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Adam Bumpus, Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne, on innovation and blockchain

Andrew Robbins, Executive Director CEO, Honolulu Authority Rapid Transportation, electric rail

June 29, 2018 by  
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Andrew Robbins, Executive Director and CEO, Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation, electric rail, electrification, public, transportation.

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Andrew Robbins, Executive Director CEO, Honolulu Authority Rapid Transportation, electric rail

VIDEO: 60,000-year-old preserved underwater forest discovered in the Gulf of Mexico

September 27, 2017 by  
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When Hurricane Ivan formed in 2004, it did more than devastate regions of the Caribbean and the United States’ coast. According to the new documentary “ The Underwater Forest ,” it also unearthed a fossilized forest of cypress trees which grew more than 50,000 years ago. Located 60 feet below the surface in the Gulf of Mexico , the underwater forest features trees which have intact bark and are still leaking sap. Journalist Ben Raines discovered the underwater forest after conversing with fishermen who reported “unusual” activity in the area. The preserved forest is expected to have been buried by sediment, which protected it from decomposition, as a result of the last ice age which occurred approximately 60,000 years ago. After Hurricane Ivan uncovered the forest, it transformed into a flourishing ecosystem. Said Professor Kristine DeLong, an LSU Department of Geography & Anthropology Associate, “Everything is in place in that ecosystem . It’s just been buried and preserved through time.” The trees were prevented from decomposing due to the presence of thick mud. Without oxygen , decomposition could not occur in the underwater environment. However, the Category 4 hurricane — which had 140-mile per hour winds and 98-foot-tall waves — changed that in 2004. Related: Report: meat industry responsible for largest-ever ‘dead zone’ in the Gulf of Mexico Raines worked with scientists from Louisiana State University and the University of Southern Mississippi for the first samples and subsequent investigations. Using advanced sonar machines, the researchers discovered additional trees which are still buried approximately 10 feet below the sediment. The experts also used radio-carbon dating to discern the forests’ approximate age. Reportedly, the trees show signs of “stress events.” This indicates that the trees experienced a rapid decrease in growth, followed by a quick increase, then a swift, final growth decline. The experts agree that the trees soon after died around the same time. Due to pollution — which includes run-off and oil spills — the Gulf of Mexico is becoming more toxic every year. This newly-discovered ecosystem could provide a glimpse of the future of the Gulf coast, say the researchers. “It’s pretty rapid change, geologically speaking,” said paleontologist Martin Becker of William Paterson University. “We’re looking at 60 feet of seawater where a forest used to be. I’m looking at a lot of development, of people’s shore homes and condominiums, etc. The forest is predicting the future, and maybe a pretty unpleasant one.” + The Underwater Forest Via AL , Daily Mail Images via The Underwater Forest/Ben Raines

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VIDEO: 60,000-year-old preserved underwater forest discovered in the Gulf of Mexico

These cork Topo Coasters are carved with the geography of real places

August 11, 2015 by  
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Bangladesh police kill six tiger poachers

August 11, 2015 by  
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Six alleged poachers were killed in the Sundarbans National Park in Bangladesh on Sunday after a raid by local police. Three adult Bengal tiger skins were found at the poachers’ camp, along with incriminating weapons. The country has intensified its takedown measures against poaching after researchers found a dramatic drop in the prevalence of Bengals in the wild – an estimated 106, down from 440 , according to new census data. Read the rest of Bangladesh police kill six tiger poachers

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Bangladesh police kill six tiger poachers

Refuge in the Alps Looks Like a Giant Telescope

December 16, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design & Geography & Travel . ] After a long day of climbing mountains in the Alps, looking out over snow-covered boulders and valleys shrouded in fog, wouldn’t it be amazing to spend a night in this cozy cantilevered getaway ? The prefabricated tube juts out over a cliff, resembling a giant telescope from which occupants can continue to gaze at their incomparable surroundings. ‘New Refuge Gervasutti’ was designed by Italian architects LEAPfactory, who specialize in modular survival structures that can withstand extreme conditions and environments. The tube was built off-site and carried to its rocky perch by a helicopter. Though the red pattern has a practical function – making the refuge visible to climbers and mountaineers – it also has a bit of Alpine charm, looking like decorative trim on a sweater. The refuge pod features a number of circular porthole-like windows on either side, and is covered in solar panels which power lights, a weather monitoring station and other electronics. There’s a living area with a kitchen, a table and seating, and a sleeping area with bunk beds and storage space for gear. Say the architects, “The realisation of the refuge is a great achievement, in that the materials used are of a high standard and use sophisticated technology capable of handling the problems of extreme temperatures and the difficulties of installation, given the altitude and the position in the midst of a glacier.” Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Amazing Living Art: 18 Giant Rice Murals [PICS] Cooler than crop circles, the agricultural artistry is incredibly inventive which gives rise to marketing creativity. Here are 18 amazing and artistic rice murals. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» Giant German Airship Hangar Transformed into Tropical Resort A massive airship hangar was transformed into a self-contained tropical city in the middle of the German countryside, complete with the world’s largest pool. Click Here to Read More »» Slime Stew, Anyone? Giant Snails Battle Malnutrition You’ve heard of crime-fighting turtles, but malnutrition-fighting snails? These slimy slinkers could be the key to keeping African families fed and healthy. 3 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Art & Design & Geography & Travel . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Refuge in the Alps Looks Like a Giant Telescope

25hours: Reclaimed Shipping Container Hotel in Hamburg

December 2, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design & Geography & Travel . ] Have you ever visited a harbor bustling with barges, cranes and sunburned dock workers and thought, ‘I wish I could sleep here’? If so, you’re in luck. The architecture firm Stephen Williams Associates have completed a hotel in Hamburg that will make you feel like you’re staying in a shipping warehouse “with the roughness a sailor would appreciate.” The central unit of the 25hours Hafencity Hotel is a bright orange, weather-worn shipping container that was donated to the project. It encloses a conference center adjacent to the main lounge, where the floor is painted with yellow grid markings.  The main desk is made of plywood boxes, and when guests arrive, they pile their luggage onto industrial trolleys that are lugged around by burly safe in Breton shirts. Guest rooms are intimate as ship cabins, each fitted with a trunk stocked with drinks, a logbook, information packets and electrical sockets. The architects emphasize that staying here is an experience in itself, boasting, “The ‘Hafen Sauna’ is on the rooftop built within a rusty container with panoramic views over the industrial harbor. It is the furthest from wellness that one could imagine.” “We wanted to create a web of meaning with interrelating signs and symbols referring to seafaring and harbour life. A place where old and new stories come to life,” says Stephen Williams. “Objects are just like characters in the script, they are not the story itself. It is the interplay that brings this to life, the context of spacial sequences. To achieve democratic spaces where everyone can feel comfortable and be who they are is worth achieving. Then we have created the true living room of the Harbour city.” Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Great Crates: 3 Cool Cases of Shipping Container Reuse A zero-waste pop-up restaurant, a chic and colorful guest house and a cool new concept for Boy Scout camp cabins are 3 new examples of shipping container reuse. 2 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» World’s Trashiest Hotel: Rome Hotel Built of Beach Garbage Think that fleabag motel you stayed in was trashy? It was nothing compared to this hotel, which was made entirely of garbage found on the beach. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» 15 Awesome Ways to Reuse Shipping Containers Once their conventional usefulness is up, shipping containers can be transformed into spectacular, modern buildings like hotels, museums, homes and shops. 10 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Art & Design & Geography & Travel . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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25hours: Reclaimed Shipping Container Hotel in Hamburg

25 Rad Items Made from Reclaimed & Recycled Tires

November 14, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design & Home & Garden . ] Strong and durable, the rubber used to make tires has many uses long after the tires are no longer fit for the road. Unfortunately, more than 290 million tires are dumped or tossed into landfills each year in North America alone. If only more people completed brilliant recycling projects like these 25 examples – including jewelry, flooring, shoes and entire houses – we could slash that figure significantly. Planters (images via: recaptured charm , lattices ) Stack tires and fill them with earth to make simple raised planters that cost next to nothing; the heat absorbed by the black rubber helps plants like potatoes and tomatoes thrive. Another idea hangs tires on a vertical surface, filling just the bottom portion with soil, to create unusual wall planters. Rugs & Floor Mats (images via: we upcycle , retiredmats ) Both vehicle tires and bicycle inner tubes can be transformed into durable, waterproof, non-slip surfaces for indoor and outdoor applications. Etsy seller ReTIRED Mats weaves strips of reclaimed tire rubber around metal frames. Bicycle inner tubes, as demonstrated above, is even flexible enough to crochet. Says crafter Michaela, “After several attempts I found out that it’s the easiest way to use a tent peg. I cut out the valves and then slit the tubes lengthwise. Washing the tubes has to be done thoroughly because the valves are covered in a thick layer of powdered talc from the inside. Then you have to cut the tubes in stripes and either tack (like I did it) or sew them together. The result is a long “thread” which you just crochet and then you’re done.” Jewelry & Belts (images via: trilliumartisans , julienjaborska , madeforfun , craesnyderindustries , andrewdietch ) Earrings, bracelets and belts get a tough urban look from recycled tires, even when used to create delicate leaf shapes and folded layers of ribbon. As belts, bicycle tires are still recognizable, perfect for cyclists who want to display their love for riding to the world. Bike Stand (image via: recyclart ) Tires were half-buried in the ground to make this clever and convenient recycled bike stand. With this simple solution, the bicycle’s tire could be locked to the tire in the ground to secure it. Parquet Flooring (image via: apokalupsabotek.se ) Who would have thought that recycled tire flooring could be so stylish? Swedish company Apokalyps Labotek takes some of the 4 million tires that are disposed of in that country each year and grinds them into a powder, which is then mixed with recycled plastic and formed into flooring. Bags & Wallets (images via: trigo , blowuponlinevintage , rubberpieces ) It would take an awful lot of abuse to break or puncture a purse or wallet made out of reclaimed tire rubber, so these bags should last virtually forever. Etsy sellers Trigo , BlowUp Online Vintage and RubberPieces show just how versatile this material can be. Swings (images via: inhabitots ) Of course, tire swings are nothing new, but they’re no longer just as simple as screwing on some bolts and chain. Check out these incredible creature-shaped tire swings that practically double as garden art.  Wildlife Creations cuts and bolts tires into dragons, sharks, horses, dogs, elephants, dinosaurs and more. Playgrounds (images via: maryland environmental service , inhabitat ) Animal-shaped tire swings are awesome, but what happens when you decide to make an entire playground out of reclaimed tires? With some creative thinking, the possibilities are practically endless.  Two examples include a fun scrap tire dragon in Maryland, and a ‘Rubber Tree’ design by AnneMarie van Splunter installed in Thailand for refugee children. Footwear (images via: simpleshoes.com , instructables ) All of the qualities that make rubber tread ideal for tires also make this material perfect for the soles of shoes. The shoe company Simple Shoes includes reclaimed tires in many of their eco-friendly designs. You can also make your own hand-crafted recycled sandals from a bicycle inner tube and a scrap of used tire, as explained at Instructables. Furniture (images via: wallacegardens , bikefurnituredesigns ) Furniture made from reclaimed tires and bicycle wheels ranges from elegant and modern to funny and kitschy. The Tired Lounge chair by Leo Kempf weaves strips of tire rubber into upholstery for a rocker, while Bike Furniture Design comes up with crafty uses for practically every part of the bike – including, of course, the tires. Roof Shingles (images via: useitagain.soup.io ) You can now purchase commercially fabricated roof shingles made from recycled rubber – or you could go DIY like this ambitious homeowner, who cut strips of tires and arranged them into interesting patterns on his roof. Houses (images via: duncankinney , greendiary ) Tires are a central component of earthships, which are sustainable, self-sufficient homes made of recycled materials. Packed with dirt, the tires often form the foundation and walls of these free-form houses. Reclaimed tires can also be used as extremely inexpensive building materials . Argentine architect Carlos Levinton designed dome houses for Haitians displaced by the 2010 earthquake that devastated the Caribbean nation. Sculptures by Yong Ho Ji (images via: scrappedcraps ) Korean artist Yong Ho Ji has gone above and beyond all of these innovative re-uses for old tires with a sculptural series that binds strips of used tires together with synthetic resins. His complex works, depicting humans and animals, makes a statement about humanity’s responsibility for nature. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: 10 Surprising Reclaimed & Recycled Building Materials Old airplanes, shipping containers, silos and beer bottles are just a few of the surprising reclaimed and recycled materials that can be used in green building. 8 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» Rustic, Modern, Reclaimed & Free: 13 DIY Pallet Projects With a little imagination, the pallet sitting by the curb behind your local home improvement store could be your new bed platform, coffee table or accent wall. 8 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» 32 Amazing Examples of Recycled Furniture Art Furniture art from recycled elements is often strikingly beautiful. Many modern and contemporary furniture designs are now made using recycled wood, paper or metal. 15 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Art & Design & Home & Garden . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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25 Rad Items Made from Reclaimed & Recycled Tires

Converted Castles: 13 Preserved Palaces & Fortresses

September 2, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Geography & Travel . ] Most of the world’s castles, dating back as far as the dark ages, have crumbled into ruin. But there are still many of these daunting stone fortresses and palaces that live on in a new way – as homes, hotels, museums, universities and even bookstores. These 13 converted castles from the 10th to 19th centuries remain functional works of architecture, whether augmented by modern construction or historically preserved. Messner Mountain Museum, South Tyrol, Italy (image via: dezeen ) Leaving the historic exterior largely untouched, Italian architects EM2 converted a castle in the Alps into a mountaintop museum. Messner Mountain Museum houses a permanent exhibition about people who live in mountain communities around the world. EM2 added wooden stairways to many of the rooms, opened up the basement and constructed a few new spaces out of unfinished timber. Grey Towers Castle at Arcadia University, Pennsylvania (images via: road_less_trvled ) Grey Towers Castle was built starting in 1893 as the estate of William Welsh Harrison, and was acquired by Arcadia University in Glenside, Pennsylvania in 1929. The castle is rumored to have secret passages behind the fireplaces as well as a series of underground tunnels built to connect the main house to stables and outbuildings. It now contains various offices, including that of the President, as well as student residences. Hay Castle Books, Wales (images via: wikimedia commons , bobulate ) Hay-on-Wye, Wales is often described as “the town of books” thanks to its large collection of bookstores and libraries, and none are more magnificent than Honesty Bookshop, a 24-hour open-air bookshop on the grounds of Hay Castle. The books, which are kept in bookcases against the castle wall, are paid for through a small letterbox. Elsewhere on the castle grounds, a mansion built in the 1660s is used for second-hand book sales. Ashford Castle, Ireland (image via: ashford.ie ) On the shore of Lough Corrib in County Galway, Ireland, a medieval castle built in 1228 now offers the royal experience to any paying guests. Ashford Castle was converted into a five-star luxury hotel in the 1940s, and its 26,000-acre grounds include a 17th-century French-style chateau. Moritzburg Museum, Halle, Germany (images via: dezeen ) A ruined castle in Halle, Germany has been given a new life thanks to modern extensions by Spanish studio Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos. The formerly roof-less castle is now protected by a second-floor extension of modern steel, glass and stark white plaster, contrasting beautifully with the 15th century stonework. The structure now houses a notable collection of modern art, mostly German Expressionism. Castell d’Emporda, Spain (images via: dezeen ) Among the many breathtaking castles that have been converted to hotels in Spain is the Castell d’Emporda, which was augmented in 2011 with rusted steel parasols that shelter a terraced outdoor restaurant. The 14th century Castell d’Emporda, located on the Costa Brava, was fully preserved when it was turned into a boutique hotel in 1999. Wilton Castle Luxury Apartments, England (images via: wikimedia commons , rightmove ) Want to live in an actual castle? Unless you’ve got a royally loaded bank account, Wilton Castle in Yorkshire may be among your only chances. Though it was built in the early 19th century – on the grounds of a medieval castle – it has retained a feel befitting its history. The castle has been converted into luxury residential apartments. Carbisdale Castle Hostel, Scotland (images via: syha.org.uk ) Few hostels can boast surroundings quite as atmospheric as those at Carbisdale Castle in the Scottish Highlands. Built in the early 1900s for Mary Caroline, Duchess of Sutherland, Carbisdale Castle is now a youth hostel boasting a large collection of art, 365 windows, a clock tower and even a secret door opened by rotating a nearby statue. Parador-Castillo de Tortosa, Spain (images via: parador.es ) The Moorish king Abderraman III built the majestic Parador de Tortosa as a fortress in the 10th century. Today, the castle is a hotel, nestled in the fertile Ebro valley of the Catalan region of Spain. The Witchery, Scotland (images via: thewitchery.com ) While there are any number of old castles converted to hotels in Great Britain, none have interiors quite as magical as those at the appropriately named ‘Witchery’ in Edinburgh. Popular with celebrities and wildly in demand, The Witchery by the Castle is as well known for its richly decorated, theatrically baroque suites as for its critically acclaimed restaurant. The hotel’s 8 guest suites feature ornate drapery, renaissance-style paintings, Victorian baths, fireplaces and even hidden rooms. Scottish National War Memorial, Scotland (images via: wikimedia commons ) Located on the historic grounds of Edinburgh Castle in Scotland, the Scottish War Memorial occupies a converted barrack block on the north side of Crown Square. Though technically, this building is not a former castle, the bricks used to build it in the 1920s and ’30s are from the medieval St. Mary’s Church, which was built in 1366. CN Castle, Portugal (images via: archdaily ) How do you honor and preserve the remains of a historic castle, without attempting to rebuild it? Comoco Architects built modern viewing and exhibition spaces around the crumbling remains of Portugal’s Castelo Novo, allowing visitors to view the archaeological findings of the site without damaging them. A ‘steel box’ inside the castle’s main tower functions as multimedia room as well as an overlook. University College, England (images via: wikimedia commons ) Built in the 11th century, Durham Castle was a bishop’s palace for centuries before it was donated to the newly-formed University of Durham in 1837. Today, the castle houses over 100 students, and meals are eaten in the castle’s great hall. The castle, along with the adjacent Durham Cathedral, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Apt Adaptation: 10 Cool Converted Bookstores The details definitely weren’t lost in translation when these 10 bookstores were adapted from their former uses as churches, theaters, and even funeral homes. 16 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» 14 Smart Silo Conversions from High-Rises to Hidden Homes Sewage bins in Amsterdam, wheat bins in Australia and coal bins in New York have been transformed into stunning high-rise apartments, homes and more. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» 12 Historic Sites & Ancient Ruins in Danger of Disappearing These 12 ancient ruins, archaeological digs and historic sites could be wiped off the face of the earth by climate change, war and other challenges. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Geography & Travel . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Converted Castles: 13 Preserved Palaces & Fortresses

Ahead Of The Curve: Hudson Bay’s Semicircular Nastapoka Arc

August 2, 2011 by  
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[ By Steve in Geography & Travel & Nature & Ecosystems & Science & Research . ] Billions of years of bombardment by space rocks of all sizes have left our planet remarkably unscathed, yet if one looks closely the traces of enormous ancient impact craters are all too obvious. Or are they? Hudson Bay’s Nastapoka Arc may superficially resemble the many frozen lava “ seas ” of the moon but its actual origins are much more down to Earth. Great Whitewater North (image via: Wikipedia ) Hudson Bay, known to many from its prominent place in the center of Canada (and the Canada Dry ginger ale label), was first discovered by European explorers on this date in 1610. Henry Hudson had thought he had found the fabled Northwest Passage but ended up being abandoned by a mutinous crew who didn’t share his desire to confirm the possibility. (images via: Son of the South and Wikipedia ) Hudson lost out twice: this seemingly endless body of water was merely an enclosed bay, and although Hudson is memorialized by having it named for him, he received nary a farthing for the naming rights. We can possibly add a third fail, as Hudson sailed across the huge Nastapoka Arc without even realizing it. Oh Henry! (images via: Ye Olde Jonathan Birge , WN.com and TravelJournals ) Looking at a map of Hudson Bay one quickly notices two salient features. One is James Bay, a southeastward-pointing fingerlike projection. The other is the Nastapoka Arc, a strikingly semicircular stretch of coastline that, if expanded beyond its over 155° natural arc, would form a nearly perfect circle some 280 miles (450 km) in diameter. Knowers Arc? (images via: BBC , Science Daily and AOAS ) The Earth bears the scars of hundreds of meteor and asteroid impacts, most of them well under a mile or so in diameter. Where are the really big impact craters, like those so plainly visible on the Moon? Most have vanished due to the actions of weathering, erosion, glaciation and plate tectonics over hundreds of millions of years, and most of the larger impacts occurred very early in the Earth’s history. (images via: Ogle Earth , Daily Galaxy and KEN14 ) When a large crater is discovered, it’s often through the analysis of magnetic and/or gravitational anomalies that reveal subsurface evidence of the impact. If any surface features are found, time has distorted them such that their relation to an ancient impact would not be guessed at without the invisible data. A prime example is the Wilkes Land Crater in Antarctica, a 300-mile (480 km) wide basin estimated to be up to 500 million years old. (image via: Oceandots ) Assuming the Nastapoka Arc is the remnant of an ancient asteroid impact, it sure doesn’t act like one! Only two aspects of the area ring meteoric alarm bells: the exquisite, cookie-cutter sweep of the shoreline and the offshore Belcher Island archipelago which sits just about where a large crater’s central peak would be found. There’s no raised crater rim, though grounds could be made for repeated episodes of glaciation having shaved it flat. (images via: Manitoba Historical Maps and WorldAtlas ) Here’s another neat anomaly about the Nastapoka Arc. Early mapmakers had neither the knowledge or the instruments required to draw accurate maps, and so many early maps show geographic features in a rounded, less fractal-like style (see 1886 map, above left). As time passed and better maps became available, however, the Nastapoka Arc seemed to regress to a more rounded configuration. This led to a number of geographers, geologists and astronomers to wonder if the feature’s origins didn’t evolve, well, naturally. Lunar Tunes (images via: DailyMail UK , FARK.com and Tower Records ) I mention astronomers because the emergence of modern maps roughly coincided with the first clear photographs of our near neighbor in space, the Moon. Our battered satellite displays an abundance of impact craters, some of which were later flooded by lava and became the Lunar Maria. The features were so named due to their dark tints, homogenous surfaces and distinct “shorelines” (actually crater walls). They looked like the oceans of Earth… but did earthly seas look like lunar maria? (images via: Michael A. Covington , Newport Geographic’s photostream and Vaz Tolentino ) They do indeed… at least, in one particular place: the Nastapoka Arc. Circular reasoning dictates the “unnatural” arc must have been formed by an impact event, a cosmic cookie-cutter as it were. These reasoners thought they had the perfect pair of pairs all lined up: the Nastapoka Arc off of Hudson Bay, and the Sinus Iridium off the lunar Mare Imbrium. (image via: Our Amazing Planet ) On the face of it, it’s easy to draw conclusions based on a host of circumstantial evidence. “It walks like a duck, it talks like a duck, therefore it must be a duck!” Trouble is, ducks don’t talk… and geologists now look for a number of essential clues to confirm if a crater-like feature has a celestial origin. Above is Crater Lake in Oregon, USA… not the crater you were thinking of. Derp Impact (images via: Ottawa-RASC and Barnes & Noble ) Following the 1968 publication of On the possibility of a catastrophic origin for the great arc of eastern Hudson Bay by C.S. Beals, a 1972 investigative expedition headed by Dr. Robert S. Deitz and J. Paul Barringer failed to find any of the now-recognized markers of an interstellar impact: shatter cones, unusual melted rocks such as suevite, pseudotachylite or mylonite, radial faults or fractures, signature injection breccias, or other related evidence of what geologists call “shock metamorphism”. (images via: God Was Love , USRA and SubarcticMike ) Even the Belcher Islands didn’t fit the mold of an impact’s central peak (or remains thereof), being instead composed of ancient rocks of many types – none of them unearthly or with a direct or indirect impact-related origin. Sorry folks, show’s over, nothing to see here, just plate tectonics at work. You can fool the casual eye but you can’t fool Mother Nature. Then again, maybe we just haven’t found the right evidence yet. As someone once said, “the truth is out there.” (image via: Nunatsiaq Online ) It’s somewhat ironic that early astronomers once thought the impact-related Lunar Maria were the seas of the moon while the Nastapoka Arc – a sea of the Earth – formed though tectonic processes occurring deep within the Earth. So much for WYSIWYG… geology sometimes takes a long and complex route to an ending that only seems obvious to us. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: The Many Faces of our Amazing Moon Let’s take a brief journey through some of the more interesting aspects of our moon. 3 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» Amazing Earth Photos: Solar Eclipses from Space An eclipse can be an amazing visual experience from below, but aerial and space photographs make this phenomena even more incredible from above. 4 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» The Third Rock: Our Blue Planet Let’s take a look at some of the most interesting facts and mysteries surrounding the Earth. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steve in Geography & Travel & Nature & Ecosystems & Science & Research . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Ahead Of The Curve: Hudson Bay’s Semicircular Nastapoka Arc

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