LEED-targeted condos bring Scandinavian design to a Quebec forest

September 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Montreal-based real estate developer KnightsBridge has recently unveiled Arborescence, an eco-friendly condominium project on Quebec’s Bromont Mountain that will likely be the latest addition to its line of LEED-certified properties. Quebec design practice ABCP Architecture designed the residential development, which will comprise approximately 260 units, all for four-season use. The gabled structures are inspired heavily by Scandinavian design both inside and out and will embrace the outdoors with a natural materials palette and full-height glazing. Located just an hour from Montreal and a mere 40 minutes from the U.S. border, Arborescence will be sited in an area of natural beauty that’s also close to local services and attractions. The development was conceived as a “retreat in the heart of the forest.” Residents will have easy access to year-round outdoor activities, from ski-in/ski-out access to the slopes, snowshoeing, mountain biking, hiking and swimming at the nearby water park. Even at home, the residents will take in nature through expansive glass windows that offer unobstructed views of the Eastern Townships. In addition to ample glazing, each unit will be built using natural materials and outfitted with a gas fireplace. Tall ceilings from nine to 15 feet in height give the homes an airy feel, while superior soundproofing and insulation ensure peace and comfort. Residents will also have access to a heated outdoor pool, pond with a dock, tennis and beach volleyball courts and an outdoor fireplace. Related: Twisting tree-like sculptures redefine a public space in Montreal “If Quebec and Scandinavia were neighbors, Arborescence would be located right at the border,” said Simon Boyer, co-founder of KnightsBridge. “The development offers the best of both worlds, with sleek, modern architecture that integrates the warm feel of wood. The development is renewed with every season and is sure to please any epicurean!” The first phase of the $100 million project is slated to launch September 19 with 48 units to be delivered toward the end of 2019. + ABCP Architecture Images via KnightsBridge

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LEED-targeted condos bring Scandinavian design to a Quebec forest

Sustainable desert home has a small water footprint in Nevada

September 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Las Vegas-based Hoogland Architecture designed the Arroyo House, a forever home for a couple with a penchant for the outdoors and sustainable design. Located in the tiny town of Blue Diamond just outside Las Vegas in the Mojave Desert, the Arroyo House enjoys panoramic views of the landscape with nary a neighbor in sight. The 3,875-square-foot dwelling takes advantage of the views with full-height glazing that’s protected from the sun by large overhangs, while the water conservation and recycling system helps keep water usage to a minimum. Designed for a Las Vegas couple nearing retirement age, the Arroyo House was conceived as a forever home with a design conducive to aging in place. Examples include an ADA compliant roll-in shower and a single-story layout for the main living spaces. Currently, the house is used as a launch pad for hiking and exploring the desert landscape as well as nearby Red Rock Canyon. To ensure the longevity of the building, the architects relied on low-maintenance concrete and weathering steel for the external walls. Large roof overhangs protect full-height, low-E glazing and sliding doors that flood the modern interiors with natural light while framing views of the outdoors. Inside, the rooms are minimally dressed with polished concrete floors, white walls and light timber furnishings. The living room, dining area and kitchen are located in an open-plan, L-shaped layout next to the deck on one side of the home. The master suite is located on the opposite side of the entry and connects to a guesthouse via a shaded outdoor walkway. Related: Geothermal-powered forever home targets environmental and social sustainability In addition to ample daylighting and passive cooling measures, energy efficiency was reinforced with radiant in-slab heating and low-flow fixtures. The drought-tolerant landscape is irrigated with recycled gray water, while black water is treated on site with a septic system. The house has also been engineered to accommodate the photovoltaic solar array that the homeowners plan to install in the future. + Hoogland Architecture Via Dezeen Images via Stephen Morgan

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Sustainable desert home has a small water footprint in Nevada

Passive House-inspired home ushers in spectacular Grand Tetons views

September 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

The sublime beauty of the Grand Tetons is fully embraced in the stunning House of Fir, a forever home that boasts sustainable and durable elements throughout. Designed by Wyoming-based architecture firm kt814 for a pair of retirees who actively volunteer for the National Park Service, this Jackson Hole abode was crafted to prioritize low-maintenance comfort with passive house design principles and universal design for aging in place. In fact, the home’s energy-efficient construction was put to the test this past winter, when the homeowners lost power — the home was able to stay comfortably snug for four consecutive days despite below-zero temperatures outside. The House of Fir comprises three connected pavilion-like units clad in Douglas fir and cedar that span a total area of 2,500 square feet, plus a 685-square-foot garage. Sloped rooflines help the structures shed snow in winter. Architects Rich Assenberg and Nathan Gray of kt814 carefully positioned the home to follow passive solar principles and to maximize privacy as well as unobstructed views of the spectacular Teton Range. The key to success was the installation of FSC-certified Thermo Clad Pine, triple-glazed windows that usher in landscape views; the strategic placement of the full-height glazing also blocks views of the homes to the east and west. Related: Modern open-plan home in Jackson Hole reduces construction waste with six prefab units In addition to triple-glazed windows, the House of Fir incorporates an airtight double wall system with superior insulation and hydronic radiant-floor heating . Local designer Jacque Jenkins-Stireman dressed the clean and modern interiors in a natural material palette that matches the architecture to keep the focus on the outdoors. For instance, many of the furnishings, like the kitchen cabinet doors, dining table and master bedroom furniture were constructed from a mixture of walnut. Alex Everett, the homeowner’s son-in-law, also handcrafted custom pieces for the house, giving it a personal touch. + kt814 Images by David Agnello

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Passive House-inspired home ushers in spectacular Grand Tetons views

Retro-inspired beach hut rotates to catch the sun’s rays all day long

September 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

London-based JaK Studio has just unveiled a retro beach hut that rotates to follow the position of the sun. Located on the popular Eastbourne Beach, The Spy Glass is an egg-like pavilion striped in bright colors with an all-glass facade on one side and two port hole windows on the other. Once inside, visitors can enjoy beautiful 180-degree views of the beach and the promenade without moving an inch, because the structure is set on a rotating turntable. The design concept was inspired by the classic, colorful beach huts that were once an iconic symbol of the British seaside as well as the common coin-operated binoculars found at many tourist sites. Currently located at Eastbourne’s beach and pier, JaK Studio’s Spy Glass design puts a fun, modern spin on the classic huts by incorporating movement. Related: SPARK designs solar-powered beach huts made from discarded ocean trash “We wanted to pay homage to the traditional beach hut whilst creating a modern concept for a design classic,” Jacob Low, founding partner of JaK Studio, explained. “A big inspiration to our project was the coin slot binoculars which allow one to gaze out to sea . As you can move these binoculars, users can also move our Spy Glass to interact with the sun or coastline. It will hopefully bring a bit of nostalgia to local residents and those visiting on days out.” The brightly-painted orange and blue wooden shingles on the front door of the precast concrete pavilion achieve a nautical feel. The front door opens up to a compact space with an upholstered bench that allows people to relax and enjoy the views through the large glazed wall. A loft rests above the front door, and visitors can climb up into this area and enjoy vistas from two port hole windows. There is also a shower and ample storage, both installed to provide the basic amenities of a private beach hut. Both the large window and the port hole windows allow visitors to effortlessly enjoy views of the beach, the pier or even the promenade. The views change as the hut rotates, which is made possible by a recessed turntable. Operated by a remote control, the structure can be turned 180 degrees to provide the best views at every moment of the day. The Spy Glass hut design was one of the winning entries of an international competition hosted by Eastbourne Borough Council, which sought designs for iconic beach huts with a modern-day twist. + JaK Studio Via Dezeen Photography by Francesco Russo  and Nick Kane via JaK Studio

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Retro-inspired beach hut rotates to catch the sun’s rays all day long

A 6-foot-tall man lives comfortably in this custom tiny home

September 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

We’ve seen tiny homes built for a number of distinct uses, such as homes for veterans , students and families. But one “large” group has been left out of the movement — until now. The Light Haus is a tiny home on wheels custom-built for a couple, including a man who is over six feet tall. Designed by Vina Lustado from Sol Haus Design , the light-filled home has an interior height of 6’8″. Going vertical didn’t mean sacrificing on space or style; the house has two separate offices, tons of storage space, a luxurious bathroom with a rainfall shower and even special access for the couple’s cat. Anna and Kevin approached Vina with their hopes of finding a tiny home on wheels that would be comfortable for Kevin’s height, but still provide the amenities of a traditional home. By creating a height clearance of 6’8″, there would be ample room for him to stand up, but that wasn’t sufficient when it came to creating a spacious living area. Therefore, the solution was to extend the structure horizontally to 24 feet long, which added much-needed space. The living space is flooded with natural light thanks to an abundance of windows, especially the multiple clerestory windows that wrap around the home’s upper level. The layout has a central living area with a compact kitchen on one side. On the adjacent wall, stairs with hidden storage lead up to the sleeping loft. Again, space efficiency was essential here, so there is a whopping 4’6″ of space above the loft. Related: This off-grid, prefab tiny cabin in Michigan fits a family of five A light color palette and custom-made, multi-functional furniture give the space a fresh, modern aesthetic. Ample storage in every nook and cranny helps keep the space clutter-free. Adding to the healthy atmosphere is the fact that the tiny home was built with non-toxic materials . + Vina Lustado Via Tiny House Talk Images via Vina’s Tiny House

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A 6-foot-tall man lives comfortably in this custom tiny home

Striking, solar-powered LA roundabout manages stormwater runoff with art

September 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Public art and stormwater management go hand-in-hand in the Riverside Roundabout, an intersection that’s far more functional and eye-catching than your average traffic circle. Designed by local art studio Greenmeme , the Riverside Roundabout is the “first modern roundabout in Los Angeles” that doubles as a stormwater detention landscape vegetated with native, water-wise plants that also help fight air pollution. Powered with solar energy, the bio-retention installation is also marked with giant egg-shaped granite sculptures with faces modeled on actual community members. Installed in 2017, the Riverside Roundabout is located in Los Angeles’ Cypress Park neighborhood at the intersection of Riverside Drive and San Fernando Road. In addition to its bio-retention functions, the traffic circle features a wide array of other sustainable elements including a 25,000-gallon rainwater cistern, a natural and durable materials palette and a solar tracking photovoltaic system that powers irrigation, lighting and the artwork. “We designed a stormwater detention landscape, including an outer ring of vegetated pavers that serves as the required truck apron,” the designers explained. “Curb cuts and a sculpted topography capture and detain stormwater from the bridge. The landscape uses local, water-wise plants that are typical of the riparian LA river corridor and are irrigated with reclaimed wastewater.” Related: A California beacon of sustainability gets a LEED Platinum refresh The focal point of the durable and low-maintenance roundabout is the nine egg-shaped stone sculptures built from Academy Black granite sourced from California. CNC cutting equipment was used to slice the stone into individual slabs that were then assembled together into the sculptures. Each piece features a face of a community member randomly chosen over the course of two years. The roundabout is capable of capturing and treating a 10-year rainfall event equating approximately 500,000 gallons of stormwater runoff from the adjacent bridge and roads. + Greenmeme Images by Makena Hunt

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Striking, solar-powered LA roundabout manages stormwater runoff with art

A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof

September 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

The building elements of a century-old farmhouse in Park City, Utah have been salvaged and transformed into a beautiful and contemporary new residence that pays homage to its historic rural past. Located on a nearly 80-year-old forested plot of spruce and cottonwood trees, the former farmhouse was beyond repair and needed to be demolished. Wanting to save the spirit of the structure, the owners turned to Salt Lake City- and Los Angeles-based design studio Sparano + Mooney Architecture to design a modern abode that would occupy the former building’s footprint and make use of as many recycled materials as possible. Named the Reddish Residence, the two-story home spreads out over 4,000 square feet. A natural materials palette of timber and stone tie the building to the landscape, while elements like recycled wood and metal reference the farmhouse vernacular. Inspired by the petrified wood — fossilized remains of trees or plants that turn into stone — found on the site, the architects used building materials that also visually morph over time. Consequently, the Reddish Residence exterior includes weathering steel and reclaimed cedar that’s treated with the Shou Sugi Ban  technique for a charred, blackened finish. Further tying the modern house into its surroundings are the abundance of landscaping, a green roof atop the charred cedar-clad addition and large full-height glazing. In contrast to the mostly muted exterior palette, the interior is full of colors, patterns and textures set on a backdrop of mainly white-painted walls and concrete floors. The existing metal silo was preserved and renovated to house the home office. The rooftop is also topped with solar panels. Related: Minimalism adds a modern twist to this traditional farmhouse “This architecture takes a contemporary approach to form,” the architects said. “The house responds to the site by acting as a moderator between interior spaces and the landscape. Arcades, overhangs, courtyards and site walls articulate that relationship. An arcade marked by a gesture to the street bisects an entry courtyard. This path forms a strong entry sequence that welcomes and guides the visitor through a choreographed threshold and provides a series of expanding glimpses of the site. The design offers both ideal southern orientation and full access to the mountain and meadow views.” + Sparano + Mooney Architecture Images by Scot Zimmerman

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A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof

A sleek artist studio with Passive House elements projects over a cliff

September 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Montreal-based MU Architecture recently completed a minimalist and modern artist studio that boasts dramatic landscape views of Lake Deauville and the Laurentians’ mountainous countryside in Quebec, Canada. Conceived as a multipurpose extension , the Workshop on a Cliff covers more than 5,000 square feet of space and includes two superimposed garages, a workshop, a spacious creative room as well as a mezzanine level. The building is partially elevated on thin pillars so as not to disturb the tree line. Oriented toward the north and views of the lake, the Workshop on a Cliff takes cues from the countryside vernacular with its barn-inspired gabled form. The exterior is clad is pre-aged gray wood, and the thick exterior walls were built to meet the standards of Passive House construction. Overhangs and superior insulation were a must given the harsh climate in this region of Quebec. Joined with the main residence by a cantilevered bridge, the artist studio’s connection with the surrounding forest is echoed not only in its timber material palette but also in its series of supporting inclined columns that are arranged to evoke tree trunks. A massive glazed gable end wall is partly sheltered by a roof overhang and lets plenty of natural light and views into the interior, which is mostly open-plan with minimalist detailing to keep the focus on the outdoors. Timber cladding on the interior is paired with highly reflective polished concrete flooring. A mezzanine is set in the rear of the building. Related: Solar-powered cube home in Australia hovers over the landscape “Spacious but intimate, the interior volume accommodates large formats of paintings,” the architects said. “The minimalist play of surfaces and the rigor of the alignments put the artist’s work in scene and supports his concentration. The Workshop on a Cliff is a place of expression where architecture immerses us in creative inspiration and Nature contemplation.” + MU Architecture Images by Ulysse Lemerise Bouchard

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A sleek artist studio with Passive House elements projects over a cliff

Eco-friendly AgriNesture buildings promote agriculture and job growth in Vietnam

September 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Although the majority of Vietnam’s population relies on agriculture , rapid industrialization and a skyrocketing population in recent years has led to urban sprawl and the decimation of fertile agricultural land. To combat these trends, local architecture firm H&P Architects has made mending the relationship between people and nature one of the main guiding principles throughout its work. In its latest example of eco-friendly architecture, the firm created AgriNesture, a green housing prototype that can be clustered together in vulnerable rural areas to revitalize the local population. In M?o Khê, a town a few hours from Hanoi in northern Vietnam, sits one of the first prototypes of AgriNesture. Likened to a “cube of earth cut out from a field,” the boxy building is clad in locally sourced materials including plant fibers, rammed earth and bricks. The two-story structure is also built with a reinforced concrete frame — which cost VND 150 million (equivalent to USD 6,500) — and topped with a green roof , where agriculture can be practiced. The structure is also integrated with a rainwater collection system for irrigation. A light well brings natural light and ventilation deep into the home. The AgriNesture structures can be clustered in blocks of four around a central courtyard. These building clusters lend themselves to multipurpose uses, such as multigenerational housing, education, health or community centers. Because the cost-effective architecture only relies on two main parts — the reinforced concrete ‘Frame’ and the locally sourced ‘Cover’ materials — owners will not only be able to select their own surface materials best suited to their local conditions, but also customize the interior to their liking and add additional floors if desired. This hands-on and site-specific building process will help create jobs and bring economic stability, according to the architects. Related: This stunning brick “cave house” in Vietnam is open to the elements “AgriNesture will be, therefore, a place of convergence, interaction and adaptation of various local contrasts (natural vs. man-made, residence vs. agriculture, individuals vs. communities , etc.),” the firm said, “thus enabling it to be not only a Physical space but also a truly Human place.” + H&P Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Nguyen TienThanh

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Eco-friendly AgriNesture buildings promote agriculture and job growth in Vietnam

Stow away on this stylish, minimalist floating hotel in London

September 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

If you’re looking for a more unique place to lay your head on your next trip to London , look no further than the Boathouse London , a stylish floating hotel docked on a city canal. Created in partnership with home design brand Made , this bespoke botel and event space on the water was fashioned as “an industrial-style barge turned contemporary bolthole” with help from interior designer Katie Hanton. Kitted out in Scandinavian-inspired style, the chic getaway comes with customizable experiences, from a boat driver who can steer you around the canals to a special dinner prepared by a local chef. Spanning 60 feet wide and constructed by local boat builders, the barge cuts a contemporary silhouette compared to its more traditional canal boat cousins. In contrast to its sleek black exterior, the botel interior is warm and cozy with reclaimed wood paneling throughout and an airy, open-plan layout. A neutral color palette dressed in furniture by Made and peppered with greenery creates inviting and relaxed vibes. Guests also have the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors with a generously sized deck above or with the provided bicycles and rowboat. The bathroom and bedroom are tucked in the rear of the boat . The minimalist living area comes with a kitchen, snug dining area (additional seating can be found on the deck) and a lounge with a sofa that can be converted into a second bed. The Boathouse London is currently docked in London’s first floating park near Little Venice atop Grand Union Canal in Paddington Basin, about a five-minute walk from Edgware Road tube station. Related: Floating lantern-like church and community hub may set sail on London’s canals “We’re hugely excited to be working with Made.com, and we couldn’t ask for a better fit — our aim is to create a range of beautifully designed, stylish, modern spaces on the water, each with their own individual twist — and breaking away from the traditional idea of a canal boat,” explained CEO and Founder Cara Louise Furby. Prices for The Boathouse London start at £220 per night with breakfast and Wi-Fi included. + The Boathouse London Images via The Boathouse London

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Stow away on this stylish, minimalist floating hotel in London

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