Zaha Hadid Architects undulating riverside promenade doubles as a flood barrier in Hamburg

August 22, 2019 by  
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Zaha Hadid Architects has raised both the cultural cachet and the storm surge barriers in the German city of Hamburg with their recently completed upgrade to the Elbe River promenade and flood barrier at Niederhafen. Designed with an undulating shape that mimics the ebb and flow of tides, the revamped promenade reconnects the river to the surrounding urban fabric and boosts the popular riverside walkway appeal with a modern redesign large enough to accommodate a wide variety of groups, from pedestrians and joggers to street performers and food vendors.  Built in the 1960s, the Elbe River flood barrier was created following a devastating series of storm surge floods in 1962 that claimed 315 lives and destroyed the homes of 60,000 residents. In 2006, when the city of Hamburg discovered that the Niederhafen’s existing flood barrier was in need of significant reinforcement and should be raised to protect against threats of flooding, the government hosted a competition and selected Zaha Hadid Architects to lead the redesign. Nearly a decade after the competition, the architecture firm has now completed all stages of construction. Although the flood barrier primarily serves as a mode of defense, it has also become an iconic public space for the city, where locals and tourists alike gather to enjoy the riverside walkway. A minimum width of ten meters along the promenade ensures enough space for a diversity of activities, while dedicated cycle lanes at street level run the length of the flood protection barrier. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects break ground on an eco-sensitive multimodal bridge in Taiwan Split into two sections, the river promenade features a “larger scale” zone on the west side that overlooks views of shipping activity on the river, while the east side offers a more intimate atmosphere with access down to the water’s edge. Pedestrian areas of the promenade are clad in a dark, anthracite-colored granite that pop against the light gray granite used for the staircases and amphitheaters that punctuate the walkway and frame views of the river and city. + Zaha Hadid Architects Images © Piet Niemann

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Zaha Hadid Architects undulating riverside promenade doubles as a flood barrier in Hamburg

Zaha Hadid Architects undulating riverside promenade doubles as a flood barrier in Hamburg

August 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Zaha Hadid Architects has raised both the cultural cachet and the storm surge barriers in the German city of Hamburg with their recently completed upgrade to the Elbe River promenade and flood barrier at Niederhafen. Designed with an undulating shape that mimics the ebb and flow of tides, the revamped promenade reconnects the river to the surrounding urban fabric and boosts the popular riverside walkway appeal with a modern redesign large enough to accommodate a wide variety of groups, from pedestrians and joggers to street performers and food vendors.  Built in the 1960s, the Elbe River flood barrier was created following a devastating series of storm surge floods in 1962 that claimed 315 lives and destroyed the homes of 60,000 residents. In 2006, when the city of Hamburg discovered that the Niederhafen’s existing flood barrier was in need of significant reinforcement and should be raised to protect against threats of flooding, the government hosted a competition and selected Zaha Hadid Architects to lead the redesign. Nearly a decade after the competition, the architecture firm has now completed all stages of construction. Although the flood barrier primarily serves as a mode of defense, it has also become an iconic public space for the city, where locals and tourists alike gather to enjoy the riverside walkway. A minimum width of ten meters along the promenade ensures enough space for a diversity of activities, while dedicated cycle lanes at street level run the length of the flood protection barrier. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects break ground on an eco-sensitive multimodal bridge in Taiwan Split into two sections, the river promenade features a “larger scale” zone on the west side that overlooks views of shipping activity on the river, while the east side offers a more intimate atmosphere with access down to the water’s edge. Pedestrian areas of the promenade are clad in a dark, anthracite-colored granite that pop against the light gray granite used for the staircases and amphitheaters that punctuate the walkway and frame views of the river and city. + Zaha Hadid Architects Images © Piet Niemann

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Zaha Hadid Architects undulating riverside promenade doubles as a flood barrier in Hamburg

Forgotten urban spaces get new lives as beautiful gathering areas on Skid Row

August 16, 2019 by  
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As part of its project to update a 110-unit affordable housing project on Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles, California architecture firm Brooks + Scarpa has revitalized a couple of unloved service courtyards and a debris-filled alley into beautiful outdoor gathering spaces. Completed on a minimal budget, the Rossmore + Weldon Courtyards will provide a major positive impact on the quality of living for the tenants, who were formerly homeless. Low-cost design strategies were used to transform the neglected spaces into contemporary and welcoming areas. Completed for a cost of $140,000, the Rossmore + Weldon Courtyards include three small spaces measuring 7 feet by 50 feet, 10 feet by 12 feet and 15 feet by 20 feet for a total combined area of less than 850 square feet. These outdoor spaces had been poorly utilized and typically cluttered with debris and tenant bicycles. When the architects discovered these spaces, they convinced the client of their transformation potential on a minimal budget. To keep costs low, most materials were reused, recycled or purchased from a local hardware store. Related: Affordable housing for disabled veterans marries wellness and sustainability in Los Angeles At Weldon, the architects turned a southern courtyard and an alley on the west side into attractive outdoor living spaces. To brighten up the areas, the architects used white paint and an “interactive green wall ” of custom steel pot holders attached to a white CMU wall that holds potted plants, for which the tenants can provide care. Poured-in-place concrete seats and tables provide space to gather and rest, while white gravel and concrete pavers create visual interest and complete the light-toned color palette. In contrast, the Rossmore courtyard features a predominately timber palette. Designed around an existing ficus tree, the updated space features rolling wood-slatted benches mounted on steel-angle track as well as new planters. Bicycle storage has been integrated in all of the courtyard designs.  + Brooks + Scarpa Images via Brooks + Scarpa

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Forgotten urban spaces get new lives as beautiful gathering areas on Skid Row

Greenery-filled renovation rethinks Indonesian colonial architecture

August 14, 2019 by  
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Indonesian architecture firm Kantor Gunawan Gunawan has transformed a century-old Dutch Colonial house into the PB House, a modern home with a strengthened connection to nature. The house, which has been handed down for three generations, has been updated to meet the needs of the new family while paying homage to historical elements. Indonesia’s lush tropical greenery has also been brought indoors with full-height glazing that pulls in garden views and frames a massive green wall . Following the typical Dutch Colonial style, the house was originally designed in quarters, with many rooms arranged along a main axis and joined together by a long hallway. To modernize the space, the architects knocked down most of the walls and created a large open-plan living area, dining space and kitchen that measures 10 meters by 6 meters. The ceilings were also raised to create a more airy feel. Related: Cooling breezes blow straight through a low-energy brick house in Indonesia To bring greenery into the 300-square-meter house, the architects had to grapple with the challenging narrow site, which only allowed for a small sliver of landscaping along the house. Making the most of a constrained footprint, the architects added a huge green wall on the west side that is framed through tall glass sliding doors in the living room. The walls of glass have also been installed throughout the house to blur the boundaries between indoor and outdoor living. The exterior of the building was given a fresh coat of paint, a black door and new window seals. It was also spruced up with original mosaic glass but has otherwise been kept the same. In contrast, the interior of the home has been completely transformed. “Using white, gray, orange and dark wood pattern, Kantor Gunawan Gunawan creates a consistent color palette throughout the whole house,” the firm noted. “The furniture is also consistently made of the same walnut material as the door and wall background. The dark wood and gray marble flooring also set the tone of a cozy and welcoming living area, as it also extends to the pantry table and to the wooden decking at the terrace.” + Kantor Gunawan Gunawan Photography by Mario Wibowo Photography via Kantor Gunawan Gunawan

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Greenery-filled renovation rethinks Indonesian colonial architecture

A native meadow green roof camouflages a low-impact Hamptons home

August 5, 2019 by  
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When a husband and wife purchased five acres of bluff top property overlooking the Peconic Bay in the Hamptons, they knew from the beginning that landscape preservation would be a major focus of their future home. To bring their vision of an environmentally sensitive residence to life, the couple turned to Mapos , a New York-based architectural studio that they had worked with previously. By treading lightly on the site, the architects crafted a modernist multigenerational family retreat—the Peconic House—that blends into its meadow setting with a lush green roof, Corten steel exterior and timber interior. Designed in part as a reaction against the “insensitive residential development…and reputation for showing off” that has characterized recent real estate development in the Hamptons , the Peconic House is a callback to the modernist legacy of Long Island’s South Fork. Featuring simple and low-slung proportions, the rectangular 4,000-square-foot shuns ostentatious displays and instead uses a roof of native meadow grasses to camouflage its appearance and minimize its impact on the watershed. The residence also embraces indoor/outdoor living with a 2,000-square-foot terrace that faces the Peconic Bay and culminates in a 75-foot-long infinity-edge lap pool. In positioning the building, the architects were careful to preserve the property’s existing vegetation—particularly a 70-foot-tall sycamore located at the center of the meadow. To relate the architecture to the old-growth forest, the architects relied on a predominately timber palette that includes cedar and reclaimed ipe wood that are complemented by concrete and Corten steel. All materials are left unfinished and will develop a natural patina over time. Related: The Beach Box is the First Hamptons Home Built With Recycled Shipping Containers! Inside the open-plan living area “further abstracts the bluff-top landscape, with unfinished cedar and reclaimed white oak,” note the architects. The blurring of indoors and out are also achieved with 100-foot-long walls of glass that slide open and seamlessly unite the indoor living spaces with the outdoor terrace. The cantilevered roof helps block unwanted solar gain and supports a thriving green roof of native grasses that promote biodiversity. + Studio Mapos Via ArchDaily Images by Michael Moran

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A native meadow green roof camouflages a low-impact Hamptons home

UNStudio designs terminal for worlds first cross-border cable car connecting Russia with China

August 1, 2019 by  
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After completing cable car designs in Gothenburg and Amsterdam, UNStudio has won a competition to design the Blagoveshchensk Cable Terminal for the world’s first cross-border cable car that will connect Russia and China. Presumably powered by electricity, the new form of public transport has been described by UNStudio’s founder Ben van Berkel to be “sustainable, extremely fast, reliable and efficient.” The new cross-border cable car line will connect the northern Chinese city of Heihe with the Russian city of Blagoveshchensk. Separated by the Amur River that has formed a boundary between Russia and China since the mid-19th century, the two cities belong to a free trade zone and have historically been trading partners, particularly when the Amur River freezes over to allow passage by foot. The frozen Amur river as a platform for trade and commerce inspired UNStudio’s winning Cable Car Terminal design, which aims to build social connections between the two cultures. As a result, the terminal will feature diverse programming and curated views of both cities. The angular building will also comprise a series of landscaped terraces to create a new shared urban space — dubbed the Urban Tribune — that will serve as a cultural focal point on the waterfront for Blagoveschensk. Related: The “world’s first vertical cable car” will climb to a height of 138 meters in the UK “As it crosses the natural border of the Amur River, the Blagoveshchensk – Heihe cable car will be the first ever cable car system to join two countries and cultures,” van Berkel said in a project statement. “This context provided rich inspiration for the Blagoveshchensk terminal station, which not only responds to its immediate urban location but also becomes an expression of cultural identity and a podium for the intermingling of cultures.” The cable car line will comprise two lines and four cabins — each with a capacity of 60 passengers and extra space for luggage — and can whisk passengers from one city to the other in less than eight minutes. + UNStudio Images via UNStudio

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UNStudio designs terminal for worlds first cross-border cable car connecting Russia with China

A Scandinavian nature resource gains a playful and modern barn-shaped building

July 30, 2019 by  
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One of northern Europe’s largest protected areas for wildlife has recently gained a new entrance building with an unexpectedly playful facade. Designed by Stockholm-based architectural office sandellsandberg , the modern structure, dubbed Outdoor Eriksberg, is the first of many new buildings planned for Eriksberg Hotel & Nature Reserve in southeastern Sweden’s Blekinge County. As a blend of contemporary and traditional influences, the entrance building references the traditional architecture of Blekinge with its barn-inspired shape and “Falu copper red” paint, while its curtain-like facade creates a decidedly modern vibe. Nicknamed the “Scandinavian safari,” the Eriksberg Nature Reserve is home to a wide variety of animals—including red deer, fallow deer, European bison, wild boar and mouflon— that roam the grounds spanning nine square kilometers. In recent years, the nature reserve has undergone further development to accommodate its growing number of visitors that average around 50,000 people every year. Currently, the estate includes a restaurant, hotel and event spaces. Although sandellsandberg was tapped to bring modern buildings to the nature reserve, the Swedish architecture firm didn’t shy away from taking inspiration from local traditional forms. The entrance building is reminiscent of the region’s traditional longhouses with its barn-shaped form, large windows and thatched roof. However, the two-story barn-shaped building’s contemporary feel comes through in its asymmetrical roof line that’s topped with a long and large skylight that allows the interior to become illuminated with natural light, while the curtain-like facade gives the building a cartoonish appearance. “Previously there was no distinct entrance to the nature reserve, which at times made visitors turn at the gates in confusion,” say the architects in their project statement. “Hence, the biggest challenges were to strengthen the site’s identity and give presumptive visitors a welcoming first impression of the reserve. These needs gave birth to the idea of a textile look where an unexpected curtain-shaped façade surprises and welcomes the visitor and like a curtain open up to the nature reserve.” Related: Farmhouse-inspired family home combines salvaged and sustainable materials Spanning an area of 600 square meters, the entrance building is a multipurpose space that not only welcomes guests to the Eriksberg Nature Reserve, but also hosts events space, office areas, storage, as well as retail and restaurant space. The ground floor houses a series of back offices , a cafe and a shop that sells homegrown produce. Above is a spacious exhibition area with additional retail space and storage. + sandellsandberg Images by Åke E:son Lindman

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A Scandinavian nature resource gains a playful and modern barn-shaped building

MVRDV designs BREEAM excellent-seeking sustainable research lab for Amsterdam

July 25, 2019 by  
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A new facility for researching sustainable technologies and green business models is coming soon to the heart of Amsterdam Science Park. MVRDV recently unveiled designs for Matrix 1, an office and laboratory complex that will be home to the University of Amsterdam’s Sustainalab, a specialist research facility aimed at stimulating creative cooperation between academia, government, and businesses on sustainable solutions to environmental problems. Sustainability will also be woven into the design of the building, which will target BREEAM excellent certification and be powered with rooftop solar panels. Located on the east side of Amsterdam , Matrix 1 at Amsterdam Science Park will span 13,000 square meters. The SustainaLab will occupy a quarter of the building footprint. To open the new facility up to the existing buildings on campus, which include the six existing buildings of the Matrix Innovation Center as well as the University of Amsterdam’s Facility of Science, Mathematics and Computer Science buildings, the architects will clad a large portion of Matrix 1 in glass to ensure that the building will be “open and social.” The focal point of the building will be a spacious zigzagging staircase that’s fully visible from the outside. Prominently located at the entrance, the stairwell serves as the social heart of the building that stimulates interaction and “provides a balance in the building between the standardized laboratories and a playful, people-oriented architecture— an important consideration in a building where tech workers, who have high expectations for the quality of their office spaces, will share with science workers, for whom laboratories are unable to provide the same perks,” say the architects in a press release. “Matrix 1’s stairwell will thus allow scientific workers to feel pampered in the same way that has been normal in the tech sector.” Related: Amsterdam announces plan to ban all polluting cars by 2030 To meet BREEAM excellent standards, the six-story building will be optimized for flexibility and reusability. Office spaces can be easily transformed into laboratory spaces and vice versa. The building’s steel structure and concrete floors can also be dismantled for reuse in the future. In addition to solar panels, landscaping will top the roof to contribute to biodiversity and water buffering. + MVRDV Images by MVRDV

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MVRDV designs BREEAM excellent-seeking sustainable research lab for Amsterdam

Dramatic cliffs shape a luxe solar-powered getaway in Montana

July 24, 2019 by  
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Near Whitefish, Montana, Seattle-based firm Cushing Terrell Architects Engineers designed the Confluence House, a contemporary eco-conscious getaway that feels like a natural extension of the landscape. Named after its location at the intersection of two rivers, the Confluence House serves as a getaway for a nature-loving family. In addition to reducing its visual impact on the landscape, the architects also sought to lessen the building’s environmental impact with an energy-efficient design that includes solar panels and native drought-tolerant vegetation. Located on 10 acres framed by the dramatic Montana mountains, the Confluence House comprises three structures— a main house, a guest house and a utility structure— arranged around a protected central courtyard . To blend the low-lying buildings into the landscape, the architects wrapped the exteriors in locally sourced dark-stained wood and stone cladding punctuated with floor-to-ceiling insulated windows that seamlessly bring the outdoors in. Rugged metal roofs with an expansive solar PV system top the structures. Shaped by the neighboring bluffs, the Confluence House aligns the 2,282-square-foot main house with the west bluff while the 946-square-foot east bluff is aligned with the east bluff. The two-suite guest house is separated from the main house for privacy and is connected by way of a covered porch. “A model of efficient space planning, there are no hallways,” reads the project statement. “The flat-roofed living structures allow the complex to disappear into the horizon line.” The indoor/outdoor connection is emphasized through the abundance of glazing and a natural material palette, from the exposed-aggregate concrete floors that evoke gravel river beds to the whitewashed Douglas fir ceilings that reference weathered wood. Related: Four living trees grow through this dreamy treehouse retreat in Montana The surrounding landscape also influenced the landscaping of the protected courtyard, which is planted with native , drought-tolerant vegetation. Carefully placed boulders strengthen the landscaping’s similarities with the environment. A stream bed cuts through the courtyard and is a natural conduit for the rainwater that pours down from scuppers on the roof. + Cushing Terrell Architects Engineers Photographer: Karl Neumann

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Dramatic cliffs shape a luxe solar-powered getaway in Montana

Steel-framed treehouse slated for Malaysian national park

July 19, 2019 by  
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Visitors to the Taman Tugu National Forest Park in Kuala Lumpur will soon have a playful steel observation tower to take in the immense tropical forest. Designed by Daniel Tiong, Nature’s Catalog consists of three cubed steel frames which interlock vertically to create multiple level, open-air platforms that rise up to through the tree canopy. Recently named the winner of the Greenovation Gazebo Design Competition, the Nature’s Catalog design will be installed along a newly opened forest trail in Malaysia’s National Forest Park, Taman Tugu. The location is an idyllic tropical stetting where hikers on the trail will be soon able to enjoy the beautiful views from the tree canopies. Related: Awesome two-story treehouse is half jungle gym and all childhood dream come true The observation tower is comprised of three steel cube-like framed with open sides, creating a series of open-air platforms that rise up vertically from the ground. To get to the structure, a roped off trail leads from the hiking path. A perforated split staircase leads visitors to the first level platform, which then rises up through the middle platform. There, a sunken courtyard provides a nice space for large groups. A fun cat ladder leads up to the top of the observation deck , allowing for prime views of the lush tropical landscape. The multiple platforms were all purposely laid out in tight configurations, and at differing heights, creating private reading or contemplation spaces, open terraces, as well as courtyards, reading areas, a meditation room, etc. Additionally, the tower’s platforms are made out of perforated panels so that the forest trees and vines can grow unobstructed through the slats over time. Due to the natural, remote location, all of the building materials, which are minimal apart from the steel frames themselves, will be delivered by hand and assembled on site in order to reduce impact on the existing landscape. + Daniel Tiong Photography by Steven Ngu Ngie Woon, Daniel Tiong

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