Beer made from recycled bread is coming to the U.S.

May 5, 2017 by  
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A brewery in London is taking a bite out of food waste . Launched last year, Toast makes its beers from surplus fresh bread, including the heel ends of loaves, that would otherwise feed the landfill. Toast combines the bread with malted barley, hops, yeast, and water to craft its lagers, which are sold to raise money for charity. A full 100 percent of its profits, in fact, goes to Feedback , a nonprofit working to end wasted food across the globe. It is the rare bakery that doesn’t have a ton of leftover bread at the end of the day—more, perhaps, than any food bank can distribute. In fact, as much as one-third of loaves likely head directly from the oven to the landfill. Related: Quebec food waste program to rescue 30.8 million pounds of food Although food waste is somewhat of a modern concern, brewing tipple from bread isn’t. Toast uses a recipe based on a formula that hails from 4,000 B.C., when people in Mesopotamia and Egypt made a “divine drink” from bread baked from emmer wheat. Now, Toast wants to take its show on the road, specifically to New York City, where it hopes to produce an American pale ale by the Fourth of July. Related: British supermarket chain launches trucks powered by food waste “NYC bakeries are already knocking down our door to bring surplus loaves directly from their ovens to the brewery?,” it wrote on its crowdfunding page. “This campaign will guarantee our ability to produce 100 [barrels] of beer in NYC—with that, we’ve got a social business on our hands!” Cheers to that! + Toast on Indiegogo + Toast Via Treehugger

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Beer made from recycled bread is coming to the U.S.

Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis

May 5, 2017 by  
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Nature lovers will feel right at home with Black Magic. Designed by Colorado-based Rowland + Broughton , this glass-clad mountainside home embraces the landscape and gives homeowners the impression of sitting among the trees even when indoors. Coupled with Snowmass, Colorado’s lush surroundings, the contemporary dwelling’s clean lines and airy feel appears like a “penthouse living in a mountain oasis.” When Rowland + Broughton was asked to design the Black Magic house from scratch, they created the self-imposed restriction to minimize site disturbance as much as possible. Thus the project’s first step began with careful siting and working with existing topography to reduce site excavation. The project is rewarded with close proximity to native grasses and mature fir, oak, and aspen trees. Related: Prefab Pyrenees cabin minimizes site impact and building costs Black Magic is clad in a black metal corrugated skin that contrast with the leafy mountainside. Large windows punctuate the black metal facade to frame views of the outdoors and bathe the white oak-lined interior in natural light. The Black Magic home spans two levels with two bedrooms, a storage area, garage, and laundry room on the ground floor. The best views in the home are enjoyed from the upper floor, which contains the master suite on one end and an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room on the other. The living room opens up to a south-facing outdoor deck. + Rowland + Broughton Via Dezeen Images via Rowland + Broughton

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Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis

Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

May 5, 2017 by  
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Serving the community goes hand in hand with serving the environment at this police station in Cincinnati. The Ohio city is home to the world’s first freestanding net-zero energy police station that’s also the first of its kind to earn LEED Platinum certification. Designed by local firm emersion DESIGN , the Cincinnati District 3 Police Station Headquarters is a beautiful facility that not only produces as much energy as it consumes, but also beautifies the community with public art and rainwater. Unveiled in July 2015 in the city’s Westwood neighborhood, the 39,000-square-foot District 3 Police Station Headquarters houses nearly 200 employees. Forty geothermal wells and a 330-kW solar array power the energy-efficient building, which consumes half the power used by traditionally built facilities of the same size. Since the building consumes less energy than it generates—the energy use intensity is 28 kBtu per square foot—the building is expected to save the city a significant amount of taxpayer money over the years. Related: BIG unveils plans for NYPD’s first-ever green-roofed police station The net-zero energy building was also designed with considerable community input, from the new station’s location to the selection of public art. As part of the state’s 1 Percent Art Program, the police station includes an LED art installation that tells the story of the district’s 14 neighborhoods. Generous amounts of glazing clad the station and create a sense of transparency with the community. The landscaping around the building incorporates native plantings and includes beautiful stormwater management design, such as rainwater gardens and a stone ‘river’ bioswale. + emersion DESIGN

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Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

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