This highly insulated modular home is completely self-sustaining

January 16, 2018 by  
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Going off grid isn’t just for solo meditative retreats—nowadays you can comfortably bring the whole family along. Australian firm Modscape recently completed their latest custom modular build called Franklinford, an off-grid residence in Victoria, Australia. Shared between two families, this four-bedroom home is completely self-sustaining with its own solar system and 80,000-liter water tank. Set in an open farmland in Victoria’s Central Highlands, Franklinford takes design cues from nearby agricultural buildings with its no-nonsense metal and timber palette. Its east-facing facade seen from the approach is faced with radially sawn timber board-and-battern siding. Durable Colorbond steel clads the rest of the exterior that’s accented with Vitrabond aluminum. Oriented to capture winter sun, the low-lying rural retreat’s highly insulated shell is constructed from SIPs and thermally broken, low-e glazing to minimize temperature fluctuations. Related: Solar-Powered Modular Cabin Exists Completely Off-the-Grid in Australia The interior features whitewashed walls set against dark oak timber floors for a clean and minimalist effect. A large living wing forms the home’s focal point and is wrapped in floor-to-ceiling glazing that opens up to a north-facing L-shaped timber deck. The communal area leads to the four bedrooms via a long hallway. A nearby metal-clad shed houses the solar system and a large 80,000-liter water tank. + Modscape Images by John Madden

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This highly insulated modular home is completely self-sustaining

Heritage-listed church repurposed into modern solar-powered home in Brisbane

January 16, 2018 by  
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Brisbane-based architecture studio DAHA merged old and new with the Church House, an eye-catching modern home and adaptive reuse project. The unusual combination attaches a sleek structure of concrete, steel, and glass to a brick church, known as the Church of Figuration that was built in 1924. While the church’s position wasn’t moved, the architects carefully positioned the new-build based on climatic site conditions and to optimize passive heating and cooling and conditions for a photovoltaic solar array and water harvesting. The Church of Figuration was originally purchased as part of a $2.4million AUD hillside property in Norman Park, the sale came with the condition that the heritage-listed Church of Transfiguration be preserved . Thus, the architects kept the church as the property’s focal point by retaining sight lines: the heritage building is flanked by a tennis court on one side and a manicured lawn and landscape on the other. The elevated site provides sweeping views of the neighborhood. Related: Old converted church hides gorgeous modern interiors in London “The Church House extension is a sympathetic adaptation of an existing heritage church into a unique family home,” wrote the architects, who connected the church and extension with a dark zinc tunnel. “The extension responds to the grand scale and form of the existing church through robust materiality and formal gestures, creating balance between the old and the new.” Although the church’s facade has been kept intact, the interior character was changed to serve as the family’s entertainment room with a mezzanine-level home office. The extension houses three bedrooms and bathrooms. Interior designer Georgia Cannon carried out the minimalist aesthetic of cool-toned concrete, dark timber, steel, and glass. + DAHA Via ArchDaily Photos © Cathy Schusler

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Heritage-listed church repurposed into modern solar-powered home in Brisbane

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