Episode 241: Thinking long-term with three sustainability think tanks

October 16, 2020 by  
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Episode 241: Thinking long-term with three sustainability think tanks Heather Clancy Fri, 10/16/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (4:08). A plan for “Lithium Valley” begins to take shape Grocery retailers will feel the sting of pollinator declines Are lawyers and accountants doing enough on climate change? Features Building the B Corp movement (16:40)   While some large multinationals including Danone and Natura have embraced the B Corp certification, others have been slower to move. That was a catalyst for the new B Movement Builders initiative, launched in September. Marcelo Behar, vice president for sustainability and group affairs for Natura & Co., chats about why his organization became a mentor. ERM wants to help institutionalize sustainability (26:44) This week, global consultancy ERM launched the SustainAbility Insitute, created to define, institutionalize and scale sustainability performance. Keryn James, ERM’s group chief executive, and Mark Lee, head of the new organization, drop by to chat about the mission.  Can we use disruption to create true transformation? (35:20) The past month has seen the publication of dozens of reports highlighting paths to action for corporate sustainability as the world looks forward to life after the COVID-19 pandemic. This week, the Forum for the Future added to that body of work with its map of the multiple pathways ahead of us, “From System Shock to System Change — Time to Transform.” We spoke with the forum’s CEO, Sally Uren, about what’s ahead, and why decisions of the next six to 18 months are critical. A collaborative approach to “Drawdown” (44:45) This week also marks the launch of Drawdown Labs, formed to help companies test how to use their resources, partners, employees and customers to reduce carbon emissions, not just avoid it. Some early participants: Allbirds; Google; Grove Collaborative; IDEO; Impossible Foods; Intuit; Lime; and Trane Technologies. Jaime Alexander, director of Drawdown Labs, weighs in on how they’re leading.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Keeping Stuff Together,” “Night Caves,” “How I Used to See the Stars,” “Southside,” “As I Was Saying” and “Sad Marimba Planet”  *This episode was sponsored by IHG Resources galore Lessons in resilience from the produce industry. Subject matter experts from Kwik Lok, Walmart and Second Harvest Food Bank join us at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 10 to discuss responding to disruption and how to balance food safety and security to minimize food waste. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 54:12 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 241: Thinking long-term with three sustainability think tanks

A vote for clean energy

October 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

A vote for clean energy Sarah Golden Fri, 10/16/2020 – 01:45 I recently joined the most impressive group of clean energy leaders I’ve known, and it happens to have come together in support of Joe Biden for president. The network: Clean Energy for Biden (CE4B).  It includes more than 9,500 clean energy professionals in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. There are entrepreneurs, engineers, policymakers, technicians and investors. There are thought leaders I’ve long admired and business leaders that have made clean energy more accessible to all people. Clean energy professionals as a voting bloc CE4B is evidence that the clean energy sector is, perhaps for the first time, a significant voting bloc in the United States.  Before the start of the COVID crisis, the clean energy sector employed nearly 3.4 million Americans in all 50 states. In 42 states, more people are included in clean energy than in the fossil fuel industry. If mobilized, these millions of Americans could have a major impact in this and future elections.  CE4B shows that support for clean energy as a voting issue is already widespread. The self-organizing, all-volunteer effort has more than 25 active state teams and organized more than 100 grassroots events, which collectively have raised more than $2.6 million on behalf of the Biden campaign.  The executive council is more than 50 industry leaders, including household names (for energy nerds) and representation from major companies, including Kate Brandt of Google, Jigar Shah of Generate Capital, Kate Gordon of California’s Office of Planning and Research and Jon Wellinghoff, former chair of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Why get political now? We don’t write about politics much at GreenBiz (although I’m sure regular Energy Weeklyians have a sense of my personal politics).  Much about this presidential contest is outside of the purview of my job as an energy analyst. But when it comes to accelerating the adoption of clean energy, I would be remiss to not call attention to what may be the starkest difference in energy platforms in American history.  If I may simplify the two men’s stances, Donald Trump’s energy policy looks backward to the energy that powered our past, and Biden is looking forward to the fuels of the future. I’m not going to dive into either candidate’s specific platform; others already have written much on the topic. Rather, I’m here to highlight that candidates who support clean energy policy are also supporting economic, climate and social justice policies.  Clean energy policy is economic policy As the economic fallout of the COVID pandemic is coming into focus and the job creation is leveling off, the clean energy transition represents an opportunity to put Americans back to work.  First, clean energy is more jobs-rich than fossil fuels, meaning more people are employed per unit of energy created. A 2010 study found that for every $1 million invested, oil and gas would create roughly five jobs, while wind and solar would create 13 or 14 jobs.  Second, clean energy jobs are distributed. While dirty energy is usually centralized — think coal miners in West Virginia or roughnecks in North Dakota — clean energy manufacturers, technicians and installers are needed in every community, and provide options at every skill level. According to E2, all but two of America’s 3,007 counties are home to clean energy jobs.  Third, prioritizing clean energy gives America a chance to be a global leaders in advanced energy technologies. Getting ahead of the innovation curve means the country could be exporting technologies as other nations race to meet climate goals. Which I find a lot more exciting than trying to prop up dinosaur industries.  My two cents: if you are worried about the economy, supporting candidates that understand the jobs potential in the clean energy sector is a smart move.  Clean energy policy is climate policy  Scientists agree that the next decade will be critical to addressing climate change and avoiding the worst of its economic impacts and human toll.  So it makes sense that voters are beginning to see climate as a voting issue. A recent poll from Pew Research shows that 68 percent of likely voters rank climate as “very” or “somewhat” important, up from 44 percent in 2009. Luckily, the same policies that will create clean energy jobs will curb energy-related emissions. While energy is not the only source of climate-changing emissions, it is a sector that has carbon-free solutions today, meaning it must rapidly decarbonize to give us a chance at a safe climate future.  We’re already seeing the economic impacts of extreme weather across the country and world. Politicians that work to curb the worst impacts of climate change are working to curb the human and economic tolls.  Clean energy policy is social justice policy Like so many other issues, those most affected by pollution from dirty energy are low-income communities and communities of color.  If you’re Black in America, you have higher rates of lung cancer and asthma, and are more likely to have (and die from) heart disease, all linked to living with dirty air. Nearly one in two Latinx people in the U.S. live in counties where the air doesn’t meet EPA smog standards. People of color are more likely to live near highways, airports, power plants and refineries.  That all takes a toll on health, economic potential and quality of life. Supporting a just energy transition is synonymous with supporting marginalized communities to become more resilient, prosperous and healthy.  Clean energy technologies — the same that uplift the economy and address climate change — can help all communities thrive. Politicians who understand that are taking the realities of environmental racism seriously.  Vote Clean energy is a rare issue that is win-win-win: it uplifts the economy, creates jobs and helps curb climate change. The only downside is incumbent energy powers need to get out of the way.  Of course, the sector isn’t perfect. Clean energy advocates are working hard to not replicate the same inequities or unintended consequences as the old, dirty energy sources. But I, for one, am ready for political debates about how to best create energy systems for the future, rather than debate if we should stay in the past.  And, no matter what your political ideology is, if you’re a U.S. reader, vote in whatever way you can. It’s what being American is all about.  This essay first appeared in GreenBiz’s newsletter Energy Weekly, running Thursdays. Subscribe here . Topics Energy & Climate Policy & Politics Social Justice Clean Energy Featured Column Power Points Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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A vote for clean energy

Episode 204: Direct from Davos

January 24, 2020 by  
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What’s the buzz at the World Economic Forum? Plus, GreenBiz Executive Director Shana Rappaport reads between the lines of Starbucks’ new “resource positive” pursuit.

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Episode 204: Direct from Davos

Episode 142: Champions of clean energy equity, Land O’Lakes digs into stewardship

September 27, 2018 by  
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Also featured: A dialogue about public-private innovation in water security with the World Economic Forum’s water project lead, Callie Stinson.

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Episode 142: Champions of clean energy equity, Land O’Lakes digs into stewardship

On mobility, purpose, partnerships, SDGs and more

July 18, 2017 by  
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The Report Report is a monthly wrap-up of recent research on sustainable business and clean technology, produced by Corporate Eco Forum, a by-invitation membership organization comprised of large, global companies that demonstrate a serious commitment at the senior executive level to sustainability as a business strategy issue.

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On mobility, purpose, partnerships, SDGs and more

Countries flirt with maritime decarbonization deadline

July 18, 2017 by  
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The goal isn’t official, but many countries are greeting a proposal that would clean up the shipping sector within 33 years.

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Countries flirt with maritime decarbonization deadline

Equitable Origin’s David Poritz on overhauling oil & gas development

February 4, 2016 by  
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David Poritz, founder of energy development watchdog Equitable Origin, talks transformation of an entire industry at GreenBiz Forum 2015.

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Equitable Origin’s David Poritz on overhauling oil & gas development

The climate at Davos: 3 sustainability hotspots to watch

January 26, 2016 by  
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The World Economic Forum is building on the ambitions of COP21.

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The climate at Davos: 3 sustainability hotspots to watch

What the fourth industrial revolution means for sustainability

January 26, 2016 by  
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EDF Executive Director Diane Regas weighs in on the World Economic Forum and the future of sustainability.

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What the fourth industrial revolution means for sustainability

Cybele Young folds Japanese paper into intricate sculptures of everyday objects

August 3, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

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