Michelle Lancaster on Microsoft’s progress towards its sustainability goals

November 20, 2020 by  
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Michelle Lancaster on Microsoft’s progress towards its sustainability goals This video is sponsored by Microsoft. “One of the things that we realized as we started our discussion before our strategy refresh this year was “Were we doing enough?” and I think for us, as a data and technology company, it was pretty easy to see the climate evidence that nobody is doing quite enough and that really caused us to think not only about what we were doing, but how we were doing it as a company and a lot of companies, ourselves included, were thinking really about risk mitigation and managing our footprint which are necessary but wholly insufficient to actually unlock the full potential of our power.” Pete May, president of GreenBiz, interviewed Michelle Lancaster, director of sustainability engagement & partnerships at Microsoft during the VERGE 20 virtual event (October 26-30, 2020). View archived videos from the conference here: https://bit.ly/3kMjeXt . taylor flores Fri, 11/20/2020 – 08:39 Featured Off

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Michelle Lancaster on Microsoft’s progress towards its sustainability goals

We Earthlings: Reduce Food Waste, Reduce Carbon Footprint

June 16, 2020 by  
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The average American wastes approximately 400 pounds of food each … The post We Earthlings: Reduce Food Waste, Reduce Carbon Footprint appeared first on Earth911.com.

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We Earthlings: Reduce Food Waste, Reduce Carbon Footprint

It’s time to put people first

June 12, 2020 by  
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It’s time to put people first Lise Kingo Fri, 06/12/2020 – 02:00 Editor’s note: Lise Kingo is stepping down as CEO and executive director effective June 16. The organization’s new leader, Sanda Ojiambo, begins June 17. Seventy-five years ago, the United Nations set out to put the world on a path to recovery, pledging “never again” to allow the horrors of two devastating world wars. The premise was that a peaceful and just world had to be built on the equal worth, rights and freedoms for every human being. The same universal values and principles which laid the foundation when, at the turn of the millennium, then-U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan initiated a “global compact” between the United Nations and business leaders to “give a human face to the global market.”  In launching the United Nations Global Compact, Annan reminded us that we all have an active choice to take — between a global market driven by calculation and short-term profit and one that has a human face. Between a world that condemns a quarter of the human race to starvation and squalor, and one that offers everyone at least a chance of prosperity, in a healthy environment. Between a selfish free-for-all in which we ignore the fate of the losers, and a future in which the strong and successful accept their responsibilities, showing global vision and leadership. Failing to do so, he cautioned, would make the global economy fragile and vulnerable to the backlash of all the isms — protectionism, populism, nationalism, ethnic chauvinism and so forth.  Have we lost our way? As we set out to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the U.N. and 20th anniversary of the U.N. Global Compact, we must look around the world at what is happening in front of our eyes — the obvious failure to deliver on those most fundamental values and principles that bind us all together. With Annan’s words ringing true in our ears, we must ask ourselves — have we lost our way? COVID-19 has exposed the fragile nature of our progress. The hard truth is that our failure to create a more socially just world has worsened the current crisis and could hamper our ability to recover faster. More than half of the general population globally finds that capitalism in its current form does not work for them. Even before the pandemic, social inequalities were widening for more than 70 percent of the global population. One thing was that economies had bounced back to the levels recorded before the 2008 financial crisis, but in reality, economic growth and labor productivity were mainly carried by low-paid, low-quality and low-security jobs, with more than half the world’s population — 4 billion people — not covered by any social safety net.   Those same people have been left disproportionately vulnerable to COVID-19. Nearly half of the global workforce in the informal sector, totaling 1.6 billion workers, are in imminent danger of having their livelihoods destroyed. The 49 million people thrown back into extreme poverty, wiping out two decades of progress. The half of the global population without access to essential health services. It is no surprise, then, that frustrations are growing. The meaningless and brutal killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis by police has further illuminated deep-seated inequalities rooted in the endemic and structural racism that persists today. It has sparked a wave of serious introspection among business leaders and heads of state across the world. No one is excused from the discussion.  Inequalities and racism, of course, are not isolated to one country. This year’s Edelman Trust Barometer made for sober reading. Its January report pointed out that more than half of the general population globally finds that capitalism in its current form does not work for them. And amidst the current health and socio-economic crises brought on by COVID-19, additional polling found that the pandemic had exacerbated the sense of social injustice. Close to two-thirds of respondents agreed that those with less education, less money and fewer resources are being unfairly burdened with most of the suffering, risk of illness and need to sacrifice due to the pandemic.  It’s time to raise SDG ambition In launching the UN Global Compact, Annan was clear that without the active commitment and support of business, universal values would remain little more than fine words — documents whose anniversaries we can celebrate and give speeches about, but with limited impact on the lives of ordinary people. COVID-19 has demonstrated the cost of turning the blind eye to obvious injustices. With less than 4,000 days to get our collective plan of action for people, planet and prosperity on track, now it is time we deliver for all. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development will not be delivered through incremental improvements to business as usual. Progress to date is a testament to that. With the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Climate Agreement as our lighthouse, and the Ten Principles as our guide, business must undergo a radical business-model transformation that can lead to a new normal — one where the equal worth, rights and freedoms of people always come first in any business decision. Don’t underestimate the power of your example, your voice and your footprint in the world. Business leaders of the future need to understand that the key to stable markets is social equality. Beyond the challenge of COVID-19, many other crises loom large. From climate change, biodiversity loss and the erosion of planetary resources — this could just be the tip of the iceberg. That’s why we need business leaders to use this moment to become social activists and rethink their role in the world and their “reason for being.” Not only for the good of society but indeed the future of their own business. By deeply integrating “people, planet and prosperity for all” across corporate purpose and values, governance and strategy, business plans and performance management, business leaders can lead the way in the Decade of Action, making a step-change towards SDG ambition. Let’s choose to be social activists Now we need the most senior leaders — the CEOs, their executive teams and the boards — to become activists for social change, within their own organizations, in their daily lives and beyond. As I prepare to depart the U.N. Global Compact after five years, I want to leave you with this message: Don’t underestimate the power of your example, your voice and your footprint in the world. Leadership is about having the courage to be the change — indeed, to insist that change happens.  In the words of Annan, “To live is to choose. But to choose well, you must know who you are and what you stand for, where you want to go and why you want to go there.” As we move into the Decade of Action, let us never lose sight of our mission to be united in the business of a better world, one that leaves no person behind. Pull Quote More than half of the general population globally finds that capitalism in its current form does not work for them. Don’t underestimate the power of your example, your voice and your footprint in the world. Topics Corporate Strategy Leadership Equity & Inclusion Environmental Justice Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Lise Kingo, former CEO of the U.N. Global Compact Courtesy of Joel S Photo/U.N. Global Compact Close Authorship

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It’s time to put people first

Good, Better, Best: Reducing Your Transportation Carbon Footprint

May 7, 2020 by  
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This is the first in a series of five articles … The post Good, Better, Best: Reducing Your Transportation Carbon Footprint appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Good, Better, Best: Reducing Your Transportation Carbon Footprint

Prefab tiny cabin perched on a granite rock to minimize environmental impact

October 4, 2017 by  
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This solitary cabin in Lincoln, New Hampshire, was built to fit the rock on which it sits, rather than the other way around. I-Kanda Architects designed the building as an angular timber structure precariously perched on a granite outcropping in the White Mountain. Using just nine foundation points and prefabricated framing, the architects specifically designed the 900-square-foot cabin to have a gentle environmental impact. Providing stunning views of the valley and several prominent peaks of the mountain range, the home was designed to minimize the amount of trees that needed to be cleared. Initially conceived as a weekend getaway for two people, the structure evolved to meet the spatial and functional demands of a family of four. Related: Dreamy cabin is a luxurious escape in the New Zealand bush The growing needs of the family combined with the site’s unique spatial restraints required the architects to maximize the footprint of the building without imposing on the landscape—and the result + I-Kanda Architects Via Architizer Photos by Matt Delphenich

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Prefab tiny cabin perched on a granite rock to minimize environmental impact

Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

October 4, 2017 by  
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When you hear the words ‘ cow farts,’ you probably giggle a little. But bovine flatulence and belches are pumping methane into the atmosphere, and contributing even more greenhouse gas emissions than scientists previously thought. According to new NASA -funded research, estimates of livestock emissions could have been off by around 10 percent. When we think of greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change , carbon dioxide is typically the first one that comes to mind. But methane – even though it can break down quicker – is around 85 times more powerful in trapping heat. And guess who’s pouring methane into the air? Cows. Three scientists, from the United States Department of Agriculture , Joint Global Change Research Institute , and the United States Department of Energy , reevaluated data employed to calculate 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions factors. They created revised emissions factors and discovered livestock methane emissions were 11 percent higher in 2011 than other estimates arrived at using the 2006 guidelines. Related: How oregano could save the world by reducing bovine belching The journal Carbon Balance and Management published the research the end of September. Lead author Julie Wolf said in a statement , “In many regions of the world, livestock numbers are changing, and breeding has resulted in larger animals with higher intakes of food. This, along with changes in livestock management, can lead to higher methane emissions.” The way we deal with cow poop also influences how many emissions enter the air. Using manure as fertilizer on fields yields less methane than storing the poop in pits. Changes like that one have caused global methane emissions to increase by almost 37 percent. Between 2003 and 2011, livestock yielded around one fifth of methane emissions – but they were also responsible for between half and three quarters of the methane emissions increase researchers noted during that time period. Even if you’re not a farmer, and can’t control farming practices, Popular Science said it wouldn’t hurt to eat less red meat . Via Forbes and Popular Science Images via Ryan Song on Unsplash and Filip Bunkens on Unsplash

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Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

October 4, 2017 by  
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Comments Off on Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

When you hear the words ‘ cow farts,’ you probably giggle a little. But bovine flatulence and belches are pumping methane into the atmosphere, and contributing even more greenhouse gas emissions than scientists previously thought. According to new NASA -funded research, estimates of livestock emissions could have been off by around 10 percent. When we think of greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change , carbon dioxide is typically the first one that comes to mind. But methane – even though it can break down quicker – is around 85 times more powerful in trapping heat. And guess who’s pouring methane into the air? Cows. Three scientists, from the United States Department of Agriculture , Joint Global Change Research Institute , and the United States Department of Energy , reevaluated data employed to calculate 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions factors. They created revised emissions factors and discovered livestock methane emissions were 11 percent higher in 2011 than other estimates arrived at using the 2006 guidelines. Related: How oregano could save the world by reducing bovine belching The journal Carbon Balance and Management published the research the end of September. Lead author Julie Wolf said in a statement , “In many regions of the world, livestock numbers are changing, and breeding has resulted in larger animals with higher intakes of food. This, along with changes in livestock management, can lead to higher methane emissions.” The way we deal with cow poop also influences how many emissions enter the air. Using manure as fertilizer on fields yields less methane than storing the poop in pits. Changes like that one have caused global methane emissions to increase by almost 37 percent. Between 2003 and 2011, livestock yielded around one fifth of methane emissions – but they were also responsible for between half and three quarters of the methane emissions increase researchers noted during that time period. Even if you’re not a farmer, and can’t control farming practices, Popular Science said it wouldn’t hurt to eat less red meat . Via Forbes and Popular Science Images via Ryan Song on Unsplash and Filip Bunkens on Unsplash

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Cow farts may be contributing more to global warming than we realized

6 eco-friendly gardening ideas to dress up your yard this spring

March 26, 2016 by  
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Spring gardening is right around the corner, so gather up the family and get ready with these eco-friendly gardening ideas. We have 6 gardening methods that will lower your footprint and dress up your yard. So read on and get growing! READ MORE >

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6 eco-friendly gardening ideas to dress up your yard this spring

JRKVC’s IST House Uses Traditional Slovakian Building Techniques to Reduce its Footprint

June 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of JRKVC’s IST House Uses Traditional Slovakian Building Techniques to Reduce its Footprint Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: central service box , countryside houses , gánok sheltered porch , IST-Family House by JRKVC , local building materials , simple design principles , Slovakian architecture , traditional folk architecture

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JRKVC’s IST House Uses Traditional Slovakian Building Techniques to Reduce its Footprint

VIDEO: Studio Swine’s Sea Chair is Made of Plastic Pollution Collected From the World’s Oceans

June 23, 2014 by  
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Studio Swine ‘s brilliant Sea Chair is made of plastic waste collected from the world’s oceans – and RSA Films director Juriaan Booij recently made a beautiful film that documents the process behind its creation. The short calls attention to the pressing issue of ocean pollution, and it was just awarded second prize in the European category at the Young Director Awards in Cannes – check it out above! + Juriaan Booij + Studio Swine The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cannes , environmental film , environmental movie , Film , green design , Juriaan Booij , movie , ocean garbage patch , ocean gyre , Ocean Plastic , plastic pollution , Sea Chair , short film , Studio Swine , sustainable design , water issues , Young Director Awards

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VIDEO: Studio Swine’s Sea Chair is Made of Plastic Pollution Collected From the World’s Oceans

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