HW-Studio transforms a warehouse into a food market in Mexico

August 9, 2018 by  
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When local architecture practice HW-Studio was tapped to redevelop an abandoned warehouse into a food market in the Mexican city of Morelia, the firm looked to the site’s extant conditions and the surroundings for inspiration. HW-Studio founder and lead project architect Rogelio Vallejo Bores was born and raised in the city and loved the site’s sense of solitude — a quality that he says is uncommon in the downtown of any Mexican city. As a result, he and his team used a minimalist design and material palette to create a food market, named the Mercado ‘Cantera’ (also known as the Morelia Market), that would defer to its surroundings. Completed this year on a budget of approximately $80,000 USD, the new food market in Morelia spans an area of 3,444 square feet. Before the architects began work on the design, they studied the perimeter and found it was located two blocks from one of the country’s most important music schools — a former convent of XCI Century Dominican nuns of Santa Catalina de Siena — as well as one of the most beloved and popular city squares, Las Rosas. Then the architects mapped out the most popular food spots in the area and found that people congregated in the public squares to eat. As a result, the guiding principles of the food market are borrowed from the design of public squares, from the use of natural materials, axial routes and sense of openness and connection with nature. “We thought that the place had lost its soul,” said the architects of the warehouse due to its numerous renovations. “Everything antique with architectural value would be rescued, and the new would formally and materially have a different nature: a white and defined nature that would demonstrate its own presence and its own historical and conceptual moment. With this, we would try to achieve a balance between the new and the old.” Related: Grain silo transformed into a community food hall in the Netherlands In contrast to the stone walls and other antique details that were preserved, the architects inserted minimalist and modern white volumes to house the food vendors. They also added a new tree-lined central corridor between the new volumes to emphasize the open-air market’s connection with the outdoors. The eating areas are located on the top of the stalls. The architects noted, “Its most important function is to frame, without exclusion, the different layers of architectural history left over the centuries.” + HW-Studio Via Dezeen Images by Bruno Gómez de la Cueva

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HW-Studio transforms a warehouse into a food market in Mexico

Urban farming, food markets and parks replace banks and parking lots in this masterplan for Amsterdam

November 16, 2016 by  
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The project offers a solution to some of the issues plaguing the city center which is crowded with tourists, suffers from dense traffic and high rents. The innovative plan connects the northern district to the rest of the city and creates a circular path through the city, thus restoring Amsterdam’s historic connection to the water and opening up the waterfront . Related: This window transforms into a balcony right before your eyes A natural park would be introduced to areas along the road and canals, while a new food market would occupy the place of the current parking lot. Urban farming spaces would be housed in a former bank building, and various sports facilities would line the new ring and the waterfront. This ambitious plan envisions a future where the city would have air ships, interactive features, holograms, silent floating cars and delivery drones. + HofmanDujardin

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Urban farming, food markets and parks replace banks and parking lots in this masterplan for Amsterdam

Temporary Market Hall made from sustainable materials pops up Stockholm

June 1, 2016 by  
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The pop-up Market Hall was created as a temporary home for the vendors of the old Market Hall , which is currently undergoing renovations under the direction of Tengbom. The architects decided to build the temporary food market on Östermalm’s Square, a busy thoroughfare that was once the original location of the old Market Hall until the municipality forced its move in 1888. Though the government’s decision to place the pop-up Market Hall in the square was due to a lack of suitable spaces, the placement has actually helped bring new life to the area and increased the visibility of the market vendors. “It’s quite a remarkable and historic situation which we’re proud and happy to be part of,” said the architects. “From Stockholm city’s perspective it was important to turn the temporary loss of urban space into a positive addition to the urban fabric . We did this by applying considerable care to the design of the building. It required a sense of quality suitable to the local context and the historic Market Hall while using lightweight, cost efficient and sustainable materials befitting the temporary nature of the building.” The pop-up building is clad in vertical strips of untreated pine on the first level, while the upper levels are covered in a modular system of translucent multi-wall polycarbonate sheeting that allows natural light to penetrate through during the daytime and gives the building a glowing effect at night. Large glazed doors along the southwest corner and the east facade provide views into the Market Hall. The building’s modular mounting system of steel brackets enables quick construction and dismantling. Related: MVRDV’s Gorgeous Tunnel-Shaped Market Hall Opens its Doors in Rotterdam The light-filled interior features market stalls, restaurants and storage on the ground floor. The kitchens and technical installations are located on the two mezzanines. Entrances and exits are strategically located on all four sides of the building to allow pedestrian traffic to flow through the square during opening hours. + Tengbom Images via Tengbom , by Felix Gerlach

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Temporary Market Hall made from sustainable materials pops up Stockholm

Malaysia just established a massive 1-million-hectare marine park

June 1, 2016 by  
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After over 13 years of negotiation and planning between conservation groups, the government, and the fishing industry, Malaysia recently established a massive 1-million-hectare marine park. The new one million-hectare Tun Mustapha Park, located by the Sabah Province in the Coral Triangle, is home to endangered species such as dugongs and green turtles. About 360 fish species, over 250 hard coral species, and vegetation such as mangroves add to the richness of this ocean space. Unsustainable fishing practices such as blast fishing had damaged the area, but a 2012 research team discovered that out of the reefs they examined, about 57 percent could be classified as ” excellent ” or ” good .” However, they also noted pollution and heard 15 bombs from blast fishing. They didn’t see many sharks or sea turtles, which is typically a signal that an ecosystem is struggling. Related: Scientists discover a 600-mile-long coral reef in the most unlikely place The fishing industry profits from being able to use the area, but so do local communities. Around 80,000 people survive off fishing in the region. As officials worked out the details of the Tun Mustapha Park, they had to balance conservation with the needs of locals. Their solution is designated fishing zones for ” sustainable uses “, which were set up with the input of the fishing industry and locals. The Sabah Parks department confirms the park will be “a multiple use, managed area” with spots for artisanal and commercial fishing as well as areas under “strict protection.” According to World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Malaysia, damaged regions will be allowed to recover. This could take three to five years for areas that haven’t been too badly harmed, but five to ten years for areas in worse condition. There’s also potential for ecotourism : with 50 islands in the Tun Mustapha Park, visitors could enjoy activities from diving to volunteering in turtle nesting locations to lounging on white sand beaches. WWF International Director General Marco Lambertini said , “The Park’s gazettement should act as a model and an inspiration for marine conservation in the Coral Triangle and worldwide.” Via The Guardian Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Malaysia just established a massive 1-million-hectare marine park

Snøhetta reveals designs for Portland’s green-roofed James Beard Public Market

June 25, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Snøhetta reveals designs for Portland’s green-roofed James Beard Public Market Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: food market , green roof Willamette river , James Beard Public Market , James Beard Public Market by Snøhetta , James Beard Public Market portland , Portland , public market , snohetta

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Snøhetta reveals designs for Portland’s green-roofed James Beard Public Market

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