Conchs in the Bahamas could be extinct in 10 years

January 24, 2019 by  
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The Bahamas is famous for its large conch population, but some studies claim that could change significantly over the next decade if the archipelago doesn’t start enforcing its laws and introduce stricter regulations. Overfishing has devastated many of the Bahamian conch communities, and it is making reproduction so difficult, the sea slug could be extinct within 10 years. This would be devastating to Bahamian tradition and culture, not to mention the economic impact on the fishing industry. According to the Matador Network , about 9,000 fishermen, which is about 2 percent of the population, depend on the conch fishery. These sluggish sea creatures move too slowly to mate in just pairs. Instead, it’s safer for them to mate in groups, with at least 50 others nearby. But many of the Bahamian conch communities are below critical levels. Related: 60% of wild coffee species are now threatened with extinction The conchs in the Florida Keys suffered the same fate more than four decades ago. Back in 1975, the once abundant conch population went extinct because of overfishing. Now, the Bahamas are facing the same problem, because the nation has some of the most lenient fishing regulations in the Caribbean. However, the Bahamas’ Department of Marine Resources announced on January 13 that it would be ending exports and increasing its regulatory staff in an effort to protect the conchs . There could be some push-back according to Shelly Cant-Woodside, the director of science and policy for the Bahamas National Trust. “We’re not used to regulations or enforcement,” Cant-Woodside told National Geographic . Because the conch industry is the only source of income for many residents of the Bahamas, they might not welcome new restrictions. Right now, the fishermen can legally fish adult conchs after they have had enough time to reproduce. But the Bahamas’ Department of Marine Resources will enforce this rule more strictly by recommending a mandatory minimum shell thickness. Biologist Any Kough said that the new recommendation is encouraging, and it is a “clear sign” that the department is aware of the troubles the conch population is facing in the Bahamas. Via Matador Network and National Geographic Image via Briana Baud

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Conchs in the Bahamas could be extinct in 10 years

Conservationists rid Florida of invasive iguanas by smashing their heads

March 16, 2018 by  
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Invasive iguana populations have soared in Florida , and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission launched a $63,000 research project to figure out the best way to get rid of the lizards . But the Sun Sentinel and Gizmodo reported some people are taking issue with one method: that of smashing in the iguanas’ heads. Iguanas can impact native wildlife and plants and irritate homeowners, according to commission spokesperson Carli Segelson. Gizmodo said many residents of Florida consider the reptiles pests, akin to rats. A 15-person University of Florida team, whose work is part of the commission’s project, is tackling the problem with methods like a captive bolt gun or bashing the reptiles’ heads against solid objects, including a boat and truck they’re traveling in to track the creatures down, according to the Sun Sentinel. Wildlife biologist Jenny Ketterlin said their methods are compatible with Florida’s anti-cruelty laws, and that destroying the iguanas’ brains rapidly is the most humane method of killing them. The team has taken out 249 iguanas near a canal over three months, and have spurned other extermination techniques on the grounds they’re inefficient, not safe, unproven, or crueler. Related: It’s so cold that frozen iguanas are falling off trees in Florida Some people don’t like the sound of smashing in iguanas’ heads. The Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy executive director Lori Marino described the method as appalling; veterinarian Susan Kelleher said it’s cruel and a kinder method of killing the iguanas would be sedating and euthanizing them. Gizmodo said this is a complicated situation. They spoke with iguana expert Joe Wasilewski who said he did cringe when he heard about iguana heads bashed in, but that this method is one of the better options we have. “In less than a second these lizards go from being cognizant to completely dead. Is that cruel?” he told Gizmodo. “Look, we kill millions upon millions of rats and cockroaches every year. The last thing I want to do is harm one. I’ve spent my whole career trying to improve their island habitats, but the sheer number of iguanas is exploding — it’s a situation that’s not getting better any time soon.” Via the Sun Sentinel and Gizmodo Images via Depositphotos and Skye am i/Wikimedia Commons

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Conservationists rid Florida of invasive iguanas by smashing their heads

Protected mangroves off the coast of Miami razed for a boat show

June 30, 2015 by  
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Wetlands and mangroves along much of the Gulf Coast are vital coastal ecosystems that also defend against sea level rise and storm surges . For decades these wetlands have been under attack from coastal development and the oil and gas industry, which is why large swathes are now protected. All of this makes it all the more baffling that a private contractor has destroyed a 300-foot stretch of mangrove trees near Miami as part of preparations for the 2016 Miami International Boat Show , yet Mayor Tomas Regalado appears largely unconcerned. Read the rest of Protected mangroves off the coast of Miami razed for a boat show Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bay biscayne , envrionmental destruction , florida keys , hurricane season , international boat show , miami marine stadium , protected mangroves , sea level rise , wetlands destruction , wetlands ecosystem , wetlands loss

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Protected mangroves off the coast of Miami razed for a boat show

DIY: How to sew your own (adorable) upcycled picnic blanket

June 30, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of DIY: How to sew your own (adorable) upcycled picnic blanket Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: blanket , crafts , DIY , DIY picnic blanket , festival , green home decor , how to make your own recycled picnic blanket , how-to , picnic , recycled picnic blanket , sewing , summer picnic blanket

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DIY: How to sew your own (adorable) upcycled picnic blanket

Researchers develop energy-generating car tires

June 30, 2015 by  
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Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed an innovative car tire that harvests energy from friction. The tire is embedded with a new nanogenerator and electrodes, and when it rubs against the road it produces a small electric current. This occurrence is known as the triboelectric effect, and it reclaims energy that is otherwise lost during transit. The development has obvious applications for electric cars, and it could also improve the fuel efficiency of petrol-sucking vehicles. Read the rest of Researchers develop energy-generating car tires Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: electric cars , energy generating tire , energy harvesting tire , friction energy , fuel efficiency , Green Transportation , nanogenerator , triboelectric effect , University of Wisconsin

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Researchers develop energy-generating car tires

Millions of genetically modified mosquitoes may be released in Florida

January 28, 2015 by  
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In an attempt to curb outbreaks of two devastating tropical diseases in the Florida Keys, the FDA is proposing the release of millions of genetically modified mosquitoes into the area. Scientists  have bred male mosquitoes with virus gene fragments, so when they mate with the females that bite and spread illness, their offspring will die. This can reduce the mosquito population dramatically, halting the spread of diseases like dengue fever. Local residents aren’t impressed, though: there is no guarantee that  only non-biting males will be released, or that no modified DNA will enter a human’s bloodstream if they’re bitten. Read the rest of Millions of genetically modified mosquitoes may be released in Florida Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aedes aegypti , Brazil , break-bone fever , Cayman Islands , chikungunya , dengue , dengue fever , disease control , fda , florida , florida keys , Floridians , genetically modified , genetically modified mosquitoes , GMO , GMO mosquitoes , insecticide , Key West , killing mosquitoes , mosquito , mosquito larvae , mosquitoes , Oxitec , petition , petitions , tropical diseases , tropical mosquitoes

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Millions of genetically modified mosquitoes may be released in Florida

TrekEast: 7,000 Miles By Foot, Bike & Canoe To Promote Wildlife Habitat Connection, Conservation

August 30, 2011 by  
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all images: Wildlands Network I’m all for epic journeys, and I’m all for conserving wildlife habitat, so I was pretty excited to get the opportunity to sit down with John Davis of the Wildlands Network to talk about his roughly 7,000 mile human-powered journey from the Florida Keys and, by mid-November, into Canada’s Gaspé Peninsula , hopefully on cross country skis. While it’s an undoubted athletic accomplishment, … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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TrekEast: 7,000 Miles By Foot, Bike & Canoe To Promote Wildlife Habitat Connection, Conservation

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