NASA researchers says Harvey flooding pushed Houston down two centimeters

September 11, 2017 by  
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Harvey unloaded around 33 trillion gallons of water in the United States, the weight of which is capable of bending the Earth’s crust . From satellite data , it looks like this is what happened in Houston . Scientist Chris Milliner of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory tweeted a map with GPS data revealing Houston has been pushed down by around two centimeters (or about 0.8 inches). Milliner’s map included Nevada Geodetic Laboratory data revealing the area around Houston was actually pushed down because of the weight of all the water from the tropical storm . One gallon of water weighs around 8.34 pounds, so if Harvey dumped 33 trillion gallons of water, that’s about 275 trillion pounds. Related: Arctic warming likely turned Harvey into “an extreme killer storm” GPS data show #Harveyflood was so large it flexed Earth's crust, pushing #Houston down by ~2 cm! #EarthScience #HurricaneHarvey #txflood pic.twitter.com/88lNScJBq9 — Chris Milliner (@Geo_GIF) September 4, 2017 It’s not the first time scientists have documented how the weight of water can alter the land. The Altantic cited a 2012 study focusing on the Himalayas that found a seasonal flux in the mountains’ height as water fell and then made its way down the mountains into Asian rivers. They also noted a 2017 study found “vertical surface displacement [with] peak-to-peak amplitudes” of 0.5 to one centimeter in the Sierra Nevada mountains. The Atlantic suggested the changes around Houston could be seen as a “fast-action version” of what takes place in mountain ranges during the seasons. The change could be due to soil beneath GPS stations compacting because of the weight of the water, Milliner said. But he thinks crust deformation was the main means of the change, since some of the GPS stations are on bedrock and also saw the depression. The ground has already been sinking in Houston, because we’ve pumped groundwater out of the city’s aquifers, according to The Atlantic. Milliner clarified the phenomenon he saw after Harvey is in addition to subsidence the city has experienced. Via The Atlantic Images via Chris Milliner on Twitter and U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Zachary Wolf

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NASA researchers says Harvey flooding pushed Houston down two centimeters

Could maglev hovering homes be the answer to rising sea levels?

April 4, 2016 by  
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Magnetic levitation (aka “ maglev ”) technology is mostly associated with high-speed trains, but could someday cross over into the world of architecture. That’s if Lira Luis gets her way. Luis has developed a concept for a ‘floating’ house that could help communities threatened by rising sea levels survive without having to abandon their hometowns. The idea is starting small, with a tiny model, but Luis has her sights set big. In fact, she wants to build a whole floating village. Read the rest of Could maglev hovering homes be the answer to rising sea levels?

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Could maglev hovering homes be the answer to rising sea levels?

SC Sen. Lindsey Graham requests federal aid for flood victims, despite denying the same after Sandy

October 7, 2015 by  
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In South Carolina, at least 11 counties have requested the declaration of a state of emergency following the floods caused by Hurricane Joaquin over the weekend. Torrential rains forced thousands of residents to flee their homes across the state’s low-lying areas, and at least 14 people have lost their lives as a result of the high waters. Senator Lindsey Graham (R) was quick to ask the federal government for aid following the floods in his home state. His request doesn’t seem all that unreasonable, given the extent of the flooding and devastation to local communities that were unprepared for the torrential rain. The troubling thing about Sen. Graham’s request is that he adamantly opposed similar federal aid to New Jersey in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in 2013. And he doesn’t remember it. Read the rest of SC Sen. Lindsey Graham requests federal aid for flood victims, despite denying the same after Sandy

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SC Sen. Lindsey Graham requests federal aid for flood victims, despite denying the same after Sandy

Ultra-efficient GRoW Home stays green year-round with solar and thermal energy

October 7, 2015 by  
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Crazy glass bridge cracks in China – 3,543 feet off the ground

October 7, 2015 by  
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Well that didn’t take long. A glass-bottomed bridge in China , suspended 3,543 feet above the ground, cracked on Monday afternoon. While visitors were walking on it. Mashable reports that Lee Dong Hai posted about his experience on the social media site Weibo: “I was almost at the end and suddenly I heard a sound,” he wrote. “My foot shook a little. I looked down and I saw that there was a crack in the floor.” Read the rest of Crazy glass bridge cracks in China – 3,543 feet off the ground

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Crazy glass bridge cracks in China – 3,543 feet off the ground

Intensifying hurricane Joaquin may hit the U.S. this weekend, evoking memories of Sandy

October 1, 2015 by  
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Hurricane Joaquin prepares to slam the Bahamas today , but the storm is intensifying and could still pose a threat to the eastern United States coast within the next few days. The category 3 storm has been building steadily as wind speeds increase and the overall pace of the storm quickens. Residents up and down the East coast are watching closely, as the storm could shift its path in the coming days and potentially hit American soil much farther north than originally thought, leading some to draw up memories of Hurricane Sandy , which devastated the Northeast just three years ago. Read the rest of Intensifying hurricane Joaquin may hit the U.S. this weekend, evoking memories of Sandy

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Volkswagen may avoid criminal charges for cheating emissions tests

October 1, 2015 by  
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Two weeks ago, news broke that Volkswagen has been cheating its emissions tests on 11 million VW and Audi diesel vehicles. Since then, Volkswagen’s CEO has been replaced, its stock prices have plummeted and there are estimates the automaker could see fines reach has high as $18 billion dollars, but will they face criminal charges for its deception? Even though VW has admitted intentionally deceiving consumers and the EPA, a loophole in the Clean Air Act may prevent any criminal charges from being filed. Read the rest of Volkswagen may avoid criminal charges for cheating emissions tests

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7,500 affordable floating homes could help fight London’s crippling housing crisis

September 25, 2015 by  
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These prefab floating houses are meant to populate disused spaces along 50 miles of waterways in London. Complemented by 150 hectares of “bluefield” space in the docklands and marinas, this conceptual design aims to bring 7,500 affordable homes to the British capital. The project was designed in collaboration between Baca Architects and Floating Homes Ltd and is among the 100 shortlisted entries at the New Ideas for Housing competition which addresses Greater London’s housing crisis. Read the rest of 7,500 affordable floating homes could help fight London’s crippling housing crisis

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Cell phone warning system keeps Chile safe through 8.3 magnitude earthquake

September 17, 2015 by  
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Just before 8PM local time yesterday evening, a massive earthquake rocked Chile . The 8.3 magnitude quake caused buildings to bend and sway, grocery store shelves to spill goods into aisles, and waves over 3.5 meters (more than 11 feet) high to smash against the coastline. Over one million people have been evacuated, but luckily, thanks to a successful cell phone warning system, the death toll is very low. Read the rest of Cell phone warning system keeps Chile safe through 8.3 magnitude earthquake

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Could a Spillway Bar Pavilion Manage Seine Flooding in Paris?

July 22, 2014 by  
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With water levels rising worldwide , there’s a very real risk of floods in any city that has a river at its core, and architect Dr. Margot Krasojevi? has envisioned a dynamic pavilion that could play a vital role in Paris’ flood control infrastructure. An enclosed circular glass bar rests over a bell mouth spillway, allowing water to enter from its entire perimeter and move into the channel. The circular bar directs water through ramps into the spillway, which is situated beneath a moveable glass floor. The bar’s industrial function is combined with a  monocoque shell , showcasing the interior’s reflective nature as it supports the water’s weight. Etched glass adds an ethereal feel to the lattice structure, filtering water as it’s channeled upstream into nearby reservoirs via submerged canals. This manner of flood protection is as beautiful as it is utilitarian, and would certainly do justice to  “ La Ville-Lumière “ . + Dr. Margot Krasojevi?  The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Climate Change , control floods , flood , flood control , flood infrastructure , flooding , floods , infrastructure , margot krasojevic , Paris , pavilion , rising water , Seine , seine river , spillway pavilion , spillways , water levels

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