Dubai’s new self-sufficient floating villas can withstand rising seas

January 12, 2018 by  
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Millions of people will be displaced by rising sea levels – but these floating homes are designed to weather the storm. Waterstudio is building a community of 33 villas to float on top of the water so that they won’t be inundated by sea rise. Construction of the community – dubbed Amillarah – starts this month with developer Dutch Docklands off the coast of Dubai. Sea levels could rise 3 feet by 2100, which could flood a good portion of the United Arab Emirates. These buoyed homes are designed to float on top of the water, and they wouldn’t lack the luxuries of your typical villa. Each one will feature a swimming pool complete with patio, trees, and landscaping. Each artificial island will vary from 150,000 square feet to 450,000 square feet. Related: INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Koen Olthuis of WaterStudio.nl talks about design for a Water World Leave your car on land, because the only way to reach these homes is via seaplane or boat. If you want to take advantage of ocean-front property without the flooding risk, you’d better start saving your pennies, because they start at 23 million dollars each. Waterstudio says the concrete base of each villa is built to last 100 years and the bases can help create an underwater habitat for sea life. Buyers can design their own island, and each one is self-sufficient. Waterstudio is well-known for their floating architecture , which includes a floating neighborhood in Amsterdam and

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Dubai’s new self-sufficient floating villas can withstand rising seas

These hurricane-proof floating homes are packed with green features

October 26, 2017 by  
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These solar-powered, zero-emission floating homes are packed with green goodness. Designed by Dutch architect Koen Olthius in collaboration with Arkup , an “avant-garde life on water” company based in Miami, the livable yachts operate 100% off the grid and feature waste management, rainwater harvesting and water purification systems. The 4,350-square-foot homes are equipped with 30 kW of solar panels , 1,000 kWh of lithium-ion batteries and high-grade insulation. They are also extremely safe and, thanks to the inclusion of self-elevating systems, they can withstand high winds, floods and hurricanes. Related: Koen Olthuis of WaterStudio.nl talks about design for a Water World The 40-foot-long hydraulic legs can stabilize the floating homes or even lift them out of the water. If you want to relocate, two 136 horsepower electric thrusters can move the structure at 7 knots. Rainwater is collected from the roof, stored in the hull, and purified to ensure complete water autonomy. The 24×12 foot sliding terrace adds plenty of integrated outdoor space and is surrounded by shock-resistant glass panels, while a smart communications system (including satellite TV and WI-FI antennas, LTE and VHF) allows you to stay connected at all times. + Arkup + Waterstudio

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These hurricane-proof floating homes are packed with green features

Sustainable eco huts built on stilts in an idyllic French pine forest

January 20, 2017 by  
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A series of beautiful eco lodges gently meld into an idyllic pine forest in southwestern France. Designed by French firm Patrick Arotcharen Architecte , the small timber huts that make up the Les Echasses Hotel were constructed with locally-sourced timber on stilts. Hovering over a private lake, the development creates a harmonious connection between the built and natural environment. The hotel complex is made up of seven individual lodges situated on four hectares in the middle of a pine forest. The design of the wooden huts was meant to create a “contrasting homology” with the natural landscape. Built on stilts, each of the structures has a large open-air balcony that allows for incredible views. Related:25 prefab eco-suites pop up at ViVood’s adults-only Landscape Hotel in Spain Further solidifying the close relationship with its environment, the wooden cabins were built with as many locally-sourced materials as possible. Maritime pine sourced from the surrounding Landes Forest was used to clad the buildings around a steel frame. In addition to the beautiful setting, guests can enjoy an onsite restaurant and swimming pool, as well as local activities like golfing and surfing. There is also an orchard and plenty of open green space to enjoy a peaceful walk. The hotel is currently building an eco-friendly tree hut to view the beautiful area from a birds-eye view. + Patrick Arotcharen Architecte + Les Echasses Via Archdaily Photography by Mathieu Choiselat and Vincent Monthiers

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Sustainable eco huts built on stilts in an idyllic French pine forest

6 amphibious houses that float to escape flooding

January 12, 2017 by  
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Building in a flood zone sounds like asking for trouble, but that doesn’t have to be the case if you use the right construction techniques. The most basic strategy to avoid rising waters is to raise the buildings above the flood level, but we’re more impressed by the houses that actually float off the ground when waters rush in. While this type of automated flood defense isn’t as common as elevated homes , we may see it pop up in more houses as flooding threatens to become a regular occurrence around the world. To take a closer look at these adaptive structures, we’ve rounded up six amphibious houses that float above the floodwaters—keep reading to see them all. Amphibious House by Baca Architects Baca Architects designed the Amphibious House, a flood-resistant home that enjoys gorgeous waterfront views without risk of water damage. Sited on the coveted banks of the River Thames in Buckinghamshire’s town of Marlow, the luxury home, which is described as the UK’s first amphibious house, rests on separated foundations that let the structure float upwards on extended guideposts when the River Thames overflows. The buoyant home has a 2.5-meter-high floodwater clearance. FLOAT House by Morphosis The LEED Platinum -certified FLOAT House is one of our favorite amphibious homes due to its small environmental footprint. Designed by Morphosis for Brad Pitt’s Make it Right Foundation in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward, the net-zero 945-square-foot home offers a solution for floodwater-prone regions around the globe. The house is built on a prefabricated chassis made of polystyrene foam coated in glass fiber-reinforced concrete that’s lightweight enough to serve as a raft when floodwaters buoy the home up. Bamboo homes by H&P Architects Amphibious homes can also be affordable, as evidenced in H&P Architects’ designs for these bamboo homes in Southeast Asia. Made from locally-sourced bamboo , the thatched homes are built on platforms constructed from reused oil drums anchored in place. The recycled oil drums serve as a float and allow floodwater to buoy the home upwards. Maasbommel’s Amphibious Homes by Waterstudio and Dura Vermeer It should come as no surprise that the Netherlands is home to amphibious architecture given their low-lying landscapes. Dutch firms Waterstudio and Dura Vermeer completed a famous example of amphibious housing in Maasbommel, an area near the Maas River. Though the homes there sit on the river bottom, the architecture is engineered so that the house and foundation will float upwards in the event of a flood. Electrical and sewer lines are kept intact thanks to flexible pipes. Amphibious Container by Green Container International Aid When heavy monsoon rains caused major flooding in Pakistan in 2010, approximately one-fifth of the country’s total land area was affected and 20 million people were directly affected. In a bid to provide relief, Green Container International Aid designed the Amphibious Container, an emergency shelter made from reclaimed shipping containers , shipping pallets, and inner tire tubes that can break away from the ground and float in case of flooding. The Greenhouse That Grows Legs by Between Art and Technology Studio While the above amphibious house examples explore buoyancy, Between Art and Technology (BAT) Studio decided to take a different approach in their design of a flood-resistant structure. Instead of letting the waters push the structure up, the Greenhouse That Grows Legs uses a hydraulic lifting system that can raise the building 800 millimeters off the ground. The homeowners can move the building via remote control .

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6 amphibious houses that float to escape flooding

Solar-powered Floating Tidal House defies climate change with retractable legs

June 20, 2016 by  
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The concept house can flow with the tides and respond to environmental changes. Its legs can be deployed and retracted from the bottom of the San Francisco Bay using a rack and pinion gear system. Independently operable legs allow the structure to stay balanced and positioned closer to the surface of the water. Thanks to its aerodynamic spherical roof, the Tidal House can withstand strong winds and generate clean energy through integrated photovoltaic systems. Related: Two converging wings create a glass-clad fissure in the renovated mid-century Bal House Tidal House can be used as a prototypical floating structure for entire communities connected via a floating dock. The unique environmental conditions of each house, dependent on position around the dock, are addressed through the system of retractable legs and structural design. The solution can also accommodate different lifestyles and programs. + Terry & Terry Architecture Via v2com Photos by Patricia Parinejad

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Solar-powered Floating Tidal House defies climate change with retractable legs

2,000-year-old butter found in Irish bog is still edible

June 20, 2016 by  
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Long before the invention of refrigerators, ancient people found creative ways to keep their dairy products fresh. In parts of Ireland and Scotland , that sometimes involved burying mounds of butter in local bogs, where the low temperature, high acidity, and minimal oxygen would provide safe, long-term storage. One such piece of “bog butter” was recovered recently from Ireland’s Emlagh Bog. It weighs a massive 10 kilos (22 pounds) and it’s estimated to be over 2,000 years old – yet it appears to still technically be edible (although scientists advise against trying it). The remarkable find was made by turf cutter Jack Conaway while he was cutting peat for fuel. Conaway discovered the butter 12 feet down and immediately contacted the Cavan County Museum about his find, which is now housing the bog butter in its Conservation Department. According to the Museum, butter was once a luxury product, used in medieval times to pay taxes and rents. This particular lump of butter, however, lacks any kind of protective covering and was likely never intended to be dug up and used, leading researchers to suspect it was left as an offering to the gods. Related: Massive 1,000 LB Butter Sculpture Will Power Pennsylvania Farm for Three Days Surprisingly, this isn’t the biggest or oldest lump of bog butter to be recovered in Ireland. In 2013, another turf cutter found a massive container containing 45 kilograms (100 pounds) of butter that dated back 5,000 years. + Cavan County Museum Via Epoch Times Images via Cavan County Museum

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2,000-year-old butter found in Irish bog is still edible

Could maglev hovering homes be the answer to rising sea levels?

April 4, 2016 by  
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Magnetic levitation (aka “ maglev ”) technology is mostly associated with high-speed trains, but could someday cross over into the world of architecture. That’s if Lira Luis gets her way. Luis has developed a concept for a ‘floating’ house that could help communities threatened by rising sea levels survive without having to abandon their hometowns. The idea is starting small, with a tiny model, but Luis has her sights set big. In fact, she wants to build a whole floating village. Read the rest of Could maglev hovering homes be the answer to rising sea levels?

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Multi Level DIY Saunalautta Raft Boasts its Own Private Sauna – and You Can Rent it!

January 17, 2016 by  
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Multi Level DIY Saunalautta Raft Boasts its Own Private Sauna – and You Can Rent it!

German scientists design state-of-the-art floating home for Europe’s largest artificial lake district

December 8, 2015 by  
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This angular house combines two things we really love – floating architecture and self-sufficient design. FreiLichtHaus can produce its own water, electricity and heat and is currently being developed by scientists for the largest artificial lake district in Europe located in Germany. The project coordinators claim these state-of-the-art green homes can boost the regional economy and transform the lake district, which is currently poorly served by utilities. Read the rest of German scientists design state-of-the-art floating home for Europe’s largest artificial lake district

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Key questions left unanswered in the draft climate deal

December 8, 2015 by  
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The international climate deal in Paris has now reached the “rough draft” stage. As global leaders from 195 countries attempt to nail down the details and draft a final agreement by this Friday, many concerns remain surrounding the contents of the deal. National Geographic’s Craig Welch outlined four such issues , arguing that the current state of the climate deal doesn’t address key questions that could make or break the efficacy of the agreement. Read the rest of Key questions left unanswered in the draft climate deal

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