Earth911 Inspiration: Margaret Mead Reminds Us to Cherish this Earth

October 15, 2021 by  
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Anthropologist and environmentalist Margaret Mead inaugurated the first Earth Day in 1970. In her speech,… The post Earth911 Inspiration: Margaret Mead Reminds Us to Cherish this Earth appeared first on Earth911.

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Earth911 Inspiration: Margaret Mead Reminds Us to Cherish this Earth

Michigan plans to build the first EV charging road in U.S.

October 6, 2021 by  
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Last month, State Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced that the state of Michigan has announced an ambitious plan to build the country’s first wireless electric vehicle charging road. It will help the state meet its net-zero target by 2050, according to Whitmer. The one-mile stretch will be built in Metro Detroit at a proposed cost of $1.9 million if the plan is implemented. In a press release sent to media houses, Whitmer said that Michigan was the first state to build paved roads in the country. The state is also on course to be the first to build roads for the future. Related: The City One is a compact, community-focused electric car “Michigan was home to the first mile of paved road, and now we’re paving the way for the roads of tomorrow,” Whitmer said, “with innovative infrastructure that will support the economy and the environment.”  The world’s first electric car charging road was built in Sweden in 2018 at the cost of $2.4 million. These types of roads work on the concept of magnetic induction. As a car drives on the road, the battery is charged by pads built under the road through magnetic induction. The road does not give the car full charge but helps provide additional power to sustain the vehicle until the next charging point. While in Michigan the idea behind electric car charging roads is still in its infancy, the Michigan Department of Transportation has already started accepting proposals for the project. When one is accepted, there will be a clearer picture of how the road will look like. The project has received both praises and criticism, with some players in the industry terming it as “unviable” and “a waste of resources.” Chris Mi, chair of the electrical and computer engineering department at San Diego State University, said in an interview that the project is unrealistic on a large scale. For the road to be usable, cars have to be built with a receiver capable of receiving electromagnetic induction power . It would make electric cars unaffordable for most people. Additionally, weather is another major issue, according to Mi.  “Michigan in the winter gets potholes all over the place, which means any of the wireless transmission systems you buried down in the road will be damaged in a couple of years,” he said. Critiques also argue that for a state-ranked 36th in terms of transport infrastructure, building such a road is not a priority. The money might be of more value if directed to other transport facilities such as commuter train systems. Via Grist Lead image via Pexels

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Michigan plans to build the first EV charging road in U.S.

San Francisco coffee shop opens right by Golden Gate Bridge

September 28, 2021 by  
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Coffee lovers have a zillion options to grab a cup of coffee in San Francisco , but Equator Coffee’s newest location will trump all the others. Its new Round House Café has a nearly 360 degree view of the Golden Gate Bridge, Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay. Round House is part of Equator’s ongoing partnership with the national park system. Its first national park location opened in Fort Mason Center in 2017, followed by outlets in the Presidio and the Warming Hut at Crissy Field. Visitors will soon be able to get cozy with a cup of Equator coffee on the notoriously windy Alcatraz Island. But you can’t top the new Round House location in Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which is one of the most visited sites in the national park system. Related: HOH Cafe is a shipping container coffee shop hidden in a tranquil park “The Golden Gate Bridge is the span that connects us, and the revitalized Round House is where we’ll meet,” said Chris Lehnertz, President & CEO of the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. “We are delighted to work with Equator Coffees, an organization that reflects our values of putting people and communities first.” Equator has long played an important part in Bay Area coffee culture. The company started in a Marin County garage in 1995, when Helen Russell and Brooke McDonnell decided to roast coffee themselves. They wanted their coffee to focus on quality, sustainability and social responsibility. In 1997, McDonnell made her first trip to Guatemala to study coffee production at its origin. In this case, the Chipicay Cooperative. “The first visit to see the land and the people who grow coffee filled me with a sense of wonder, gratitude and privilege to be a small part of the coffee world,” she said. In 1999, Equator became one of the first fair trade certified roasters, sourcing its coffee from the Soppexcca Cooperative in Nicaragua . In 2008, the company decided to buy its own coffee farm in Volcan, Panama. Equator became the first B Corp certified coffee roaster in California in 2011, and in 2016 was the first LGBTQ -owned business to win National Small Business of the Year from the Small Business Administration. “Equator Coffees will be a beloved addition to the Golden Gate Bridge Visitor Plaza, which was transformed in 2012 for the Bridge’s 75th anniversary,” said Paolo Cosulich-Schwartz, spokesperson for the Golden Gate Bridge Highway & Transportation District. “We hope visitors will use this space to meet, learn about the history of the Bay Area’s most iconic landmark and enjoy their visit to the Bridge with a warming beverage from Equator.” + Equator Images via World Centric

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San Francisco coffee shop opens right by Golden Gate Bridge

A history of sustainable energy efforts at the White House

September 2, 2021 by  
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Global warming, carbon emissions and climate change have been hot topics for decades. All the while, the reigning U.S. administration has changed its tone with each election. As a result, the focus on renewable energy has waned and grown throughout the country and in the president’s own home. In fact, since the White House was first equipped with electricity, the use of  renewable energy  sources has seen an ebb and flow that matches the attitude of the commander in chief at the time.  The beginning of electricity at the White House September 1891 saw the introduction of electricity to the White House, although Mr. and Mrs. Harrison, President and First Lady at the time, feared electrocution and never touched the switches as a result. Related: Activists protest Biden’s compromised green infrastructure deal In 1926 President Calvin Coolidge saw the installment of the first electric refrigerator at the residence. Six years later, the Roosevelts installed air conditioning in the private quarters. Beginning in 1948, the White House saw an extensive renovation under the guidance of President Truman, which included upgrades to the electrical system. President Lyndon Johnson set an example of electricity conservation in the 1960s by consistently turning off lights when not in use, earning him the moniker “Light Bulb Johnson.” The first solar panels at the White House The year 1979 saw the first solar panel installation at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue when President Jimmy Carter had 32 solar panels placed on the White House roof in response to a national energy crisis (a result of the Arab oil embargo). Although the technology of the time did little more than heat  water  for the cafeteria and laundry, Carter hoped it would set an example for the future of the country saying, “a generation from now, this solar heater can either be a curiosity, a museum piece, an example of a road not taken, or it can be a small part of one of the greatest and most exciting adventures ever undertaken by the American people; harnessing the power of the Sun to enrich our lives as we move away from our crippling dependence on foreign oil .” However, his intentions didn’t take hold, and the solar panels were removed during the Reagan administration while roofing work was being done. While cost may have been a factor in the decision not to reinstall the solar panels, Reagan’s policies made it clear he supports oil more than green energy. When the Clintons moved into office and the residence, they committed to “Greening the White House,” which included installing  energy-efficient  windows, light bulbs and a new HVAC system. The first solar power system on site Breaking the trend of Democrats leaning into renewable options and Republicans reversing them, George W. Bush was the first to install a solar system that provided electricity to the grounds. The 9-kilowatt system produced both current and hot water, which was used in part to warm the presidential pool. Another notable event in the history of the White House’s sustainability journey took place in 2008 when the iconic Portico lantern was upgraded to LEDs . The arrival of modern solar panels President Barack Obama, who was very vocal about prioritizing  environmental issues , oversaw the installation of solar panels, completed in 2014. He also installed a solar water heater in the residence.  “By installing solar panels on arguably the most famous house in the country, his residence, the president is underscoring that commitment to lead and the promise and importance of renewable energy in the United States,” said Nancy Sutley, chairwoman of the White House Council on Environmental Quality. This newer technology was six times more effective than the solar equipment Carter installed, making a financial difference and not just a symbolic one. Those  solar panels  are still in use today.  The Trump administration not only did not put a priority on renewable resources but actively worked to roll back many of the environmental protections put in place before he took office. Solar panels make history For historical value, the solar panels installed during the Carter administration were kept in governmental storage until 1991, when half were installed above the cafeteria at Unity College in Maine . Here they provided hot water until the end of their useful life in 2005.  Today, other White House solar panels are on display at museums in the United States and China . Specifically, there are examples at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington D.C., Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Solar Science and Technology Museum in Dezhou, China.  There’s also one on display at the NRG Systems headquarters, as an example of early technology at a company that manufactures modern  wind  and solar technology solutions. With all eyes on the White House for guidance on where we’ll focus next in the current of renewable energy , it’s clear that it will be some time before we see universal agreement on how to approach the topic.  For more information on the history of the solar panels President Jimmy Carter installed, you can check out the 2010 documentary “A Road Not Taken,” which details their journey from 1979 to 1986. + Energy.gov  Via Thought Co. and Sullivan Solar Power   Images via Pexels 

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A history of sustainable energy efforts at the White House

FEMA could be America’s climate adaptation agency

August 31, 2021 by  
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The recovery from climate catastrophe like hurricanes and floods falls on FEMA but the Biden administration isn’t treating the organization like our first defense against a warming climate.

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FEMA could be America’s climate adaptation agency

Appalachian Beekeeping Collective boosts pollinators and supports beekeepers

July 30, 2021 by  
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Oh, honey. This ultra-sweet concoction is nature’s candy, a product of hardworking bees. It can be controversial among plant-based eaters, but the reality is we can enjoy this natural sweetener if we learn to live in harmony with the bees. Unfortunately, bees are in trouble. Bee hives have decreased about 60% since the 1940s, and these important pollinators are only facing more crises as the planet heats up. Organizations like Appalachian Beekeeping Collective are here to help. Appalachian Beekeeping Collective (ABC) is a nonprofit organization that helps sustainably support partner beekeepers in lower-income communities. ABC provides beekeepers with training and equipment plus mentors to help them along the way. The organization then extracts, packages, markets, and sells honey on behalf of the beekeepers to help them earn income without diverting their focus from sustainably caring for the bees. The final product is far superior to any honey you’d find at the grocery store, too. The Appalachian Beekeeping Collective honey is sweet and floral and pairs well with just about any dish you could think of. ABC’s program is solar-powered , and the organization’s facility generates 66,667 kWh of electricity yearly. Related: New global bee map gives scientists a conservation baseline Although the human workers at ABC are busy bees this time of year, they took a moment to provide an inside look at how the organization works. We spoke with Kevin Johnson, mentor and educator, as well as Raine Nimmer and Colleen Fitts, partner beekeepers, about their efforts at ABC. Inhabitat: What is your role with the collective? Johnson: I am a beekeeper mentor and educator. As an educator, I help teach beekeeping classes to the general public over the winter (virtual this year) and assist with field workshops and continuing ed opportunities at other times. As a beekeeper mentor, I help beekeepers in our program develop the skills to be successful, independent beekeepers. Our partner beekeepers are from a wide variety of backgrounds, range in age from 12 to over 80, and keep their bees in diverse surroundings. All share a love of and fascination with bees. Partners have taken our Beekeeping 101 series and have agreed to follow ABC’s natural beekeeping best practices. Nimmer and Fitts: We are called “partners” in the ABC program. After taking a five week introductory beekeeping course, we (Colleen and Raine) were given four hives each when we were first accepted into the program in 2019. We manage and maintain our ABC hives and work at keeping the colonies happy and healthy. Inhabitat: What does a typical day look like for you? Johnson: A typical day is long! If the weather is warm and dry enough, we will be working in bee yards from sunrise to sunset. Bees don’t follow human schedules, and so at certain times of year (spring buildup, swarm season, nectar flows) we have to assist as many partners as we can in the window that weather provides. After dark, we often are answering calls and texts, getting our movements coordinated, and getting loaded and ready for the next day. Part of mentoring new beekeepers is taking the extra time to coach them through the manipulations and observations necessary to be a responsive, skilled, confident beekeeper. Nimmer and Fitts: A typical day of a hive inspection begins with a warm sunny day and little chance of rain. We gather hive boxes, frames and other equipment to bring out to the hives. We prepare our smoker with fuel. Once at our apiary , we both choose a hive and our inspections begin. Depending on the time of year, we are interested in certain things during an inspection, such as assessing the health of the bees, looking for any signs of disease or pests, confirming that there is a laying queen present, looking for signs of impending swarm behavior, and determining if the hive has enough space to grow. We generally only harvest honey once per year and try to be sure that we leave the bees with enough of their own honey to thrive through the winter. Inhabitat: What do you enjoy most about this work? Johnson: I enjoy the moments where beekeepers realize they’ve been taught something by their own bees. Like “Wow! They are collecting a different color pollen now” or “They are raising a new queen!” I also enjoy the process of the beekeepers honing their detective skills — noticing evidence of pests and diseases, or of changes in the brood cycle — and then looking more closely for clues to how to support their bees. There is never a lack of new things to learn from or respond to. I also enjoy the connection with people around bees because it naturally pulls in their hopes and dreams. Some want to see their gardens grow better, others want to build a hive products business, others still want to teach their children and grandchildren about the connectedness of the environment through their beekeeping. It all comes from a love of place. Nimmer and Fitts: Inspecting hives is our favorite part of our role. It seems that every time we go in we experience something that amazes us. It is a calming and grounding experience that reminds us of our place in creation. Seeing something especially magical is also fun, such as the first time we heard a queen “piping”, the time we caught a queen bee as she was “birthed” from her cell or tasting royal jelly for the first time.  Inhabitat: How did you get into the beekeeping business? Nimmer and Fitts: I (Colleen) have long found the concept of beekeeping very appealing, especially knowing that my dad had kept bees in his younger years. Around 2005, I took a day-long workshop on beekeeping and was hooked. After I moved to Bethlehem Farm, I learned that neighbors down the road were beekeepers and were willing to help teach the craft. These neighbors, Anne and Mark, came over and helped me and former caretaker Brian work the hives and learn to care for bees. Ten years later, we had a tough winter and lost all our hives. It was at that point that we started looking around for locally raised bee hives to start over, and we found ABC. The mentorship and resources available through being an ABC partner are an amazing opportunity to learn, to expand our skills and to improve our stewardship of creation. Inhabitat: What projects/tasks that you’ve been involved in for this role have made you the most proud or excited? Johnson: Making splits with a beekeeper for the first time is exciting, after bringing that hive successfully through the winter. Also, harvesting honey with a beekeeper for the first time. Catching swarms is always exciting, and a different skill. Inhabitat: Can you speak to the sustainability of the program? Nimmer and Fitts: Like many other crafts, there are innumerable methods and philosophies of beekeeping. When we joined ABC, we were happy to agree to work within their system, which includes refraining from using certain chemicals and harsh antibiotics in the hives. ABC tries to teach a system of beekeeping that considers the way bees operate in their natural environment and considers the long-term health of honeybees in general, rather than settling for short-term gains. ABC experts are working to breed queens that are well-suited to West Virginia’s climate so that the bees in Appalachia can be stronger and more resilient. We know that without pollinators like honeybees, we will have no fruits or vegetables to nourish us. And we know that without healthy employment for West Virginians, we will not have healthy families. ABC is working to strengthen the ecosystem with honeybees and the West Virginia economy with creative employment options as a beekeeper. We are happy to be a part of it. Inhabitat: Have you seen growing interest in those wanting to join the collective over the course of the pandemic? Johnson: We saw a tremendous increase in participation in our Beekeeping 101 classes (over typical in-person classes) when we moved them online this winter, many from beyond our region. Even if some of those participants decide not to keep bees this year, they may in the future, and what they do certainly impacts bees — from how they manage their land to how they get around to what they eat. Pesticide use and climate change are tremendous challenges for honeybees, along with all other pollinators. One of the things I always say in class is that everyone is a beekeeper, because every one of us has an impact on our bees. Inhabitat: How does the collective inspire local community members to get involved? Johnson: I believe we inspire local community members by engaging them in their home communities in a person-to-person, regionally relevant way, that speaks to their goals and love of place. Folks want to support efforts like ours even if they wouldn’t ever imagine getting near a bee hive. Inhabitat: How has this organization made an impact on both the environment and the people in the community? Johnson: I believe we have developed a broader awareness of how we are connected to our environment through our beekeeping program. Our partners commit to following our natural beekeeping protocol (no synthetic chemicals in the hive, no pesticides ); unprompted by us, I know partners have talked to their neighbors and friends about changing their behaviors to benefit the bees, from mowing less to planting wildflowers to not spraying. It’s not hard to come across news about environmental problems these days. I believe bees are a way of centering those problems right where we live, and right where our hearts are (in our bees, and in our mountains, that is). Nimmer and Fitts: Honeybees are pollinators so they may be pollinating our neighbors’ gardens and flowers. Honeybees also need people to advocate for them. Conversations about bees with our community members will hopefully spread more awareness of the challenges bees face and spread interest and excitement in either beekeeping themselves or, at the very least, lead a life that doesn’t harm bees. Our household doesn’t mind eating the honey, either! Inhabitat: Any last thoughts? Nimmer and Fitts: We feel that keeping bees is an honor and a powerful experience of connection with creation. We encourage anyone interested to find a beekeeper and learn as much as you can! We have a lot to learn from bees and their system of working together harmoniously with a sweet result. + Appalachian Beekeeping Collective Images via Appalachian Beekeeping Collective and Paige Bennett

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Appalachian Beekeeping Collective boosts pollinators and supports beekeepers

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens LEEDs the way in green design

July 8, 2021 by  
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“Imagine the beauty of humanity living in harmony with nature .” This is the goal behind the ongoing work to raise the bar of sustainability in architecture at The Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL) and other projects at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The conservatory offers a closed-circle campus that, over the course of a year, produces more energy than it consumes through a combination of geothermal and wind systems along with solar panels . In fact, it ranks as the most energy-efficient conservatory in the world. It achieves this title through effective use of natural lighting , venting, earth tubes and fogging systems to cool and light the space without reliance on energy. Related: An off-grid home in South Africa features a conservatory for fully enjoying nature In addition to generating excessive energy, the project treats all water onsite for both human and landscaping needs. It collects rainwater as well as filtering water captured through natural landscaping, a lagoon system and permeable paving.  Throughout the process of updating the campus, the goal has been to set an example of what is possible in innovative, passive design . As a result, the project meets qualifications for six of the most desired certifications in green design. These include the Living Building Challenge, LEED Platinum, First SITES™ Platinum and First WELL Building Platinum as well as the achievement of the first certified BREEAM Outstanding In-Use Building in the United States award. The conservatory has also earned a Fitwel three-star rating. The Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens invites visitors to wander through the campus, taking in the rain gardens, lagoon and atrium with lush greenery and native plants throughout. In fact, the conservatory has an obligation to promote green building practices with a central focus on merging human activities and nature in a sustainable way. According to a conservatory officials, “As Phipps’ education, research and administration facility, the CSL is an integral part of the Phipps visitor experience as a ‘living museum,’ focusing attention on the important intersection between the built and natural environments, and demonstrating that human and environmental health are inextricably connected.” + Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Images via Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

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Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens LEEDs the way in green design

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens LEEDs the way in green design

July 8, 2021 by  
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“Imagine the beauty of humanity living in harmony with nature .” This is the goal behind the ongoing work to raise the bar of sustainability in architecture at The Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL) and other projects at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The conservatory offers a closed-circle campus that, over the course of a year, produces more energy than it consumes through a combination of geothermal and wind systems along with solar panels . In fact, it ranks as the most energy-efficient conservatory in the world. It achieves this title through effective use of natural lighting , venting, earth tubes and fogging systems to cool and light the space without reliance on energy. Related: An off-grid home in South Africa features a conservatory for fully enjoying nature In addition to generating excessive energy, the project treats all water onsite for both human and landscaping needs. It collects rainwater as well as filtering water captured through natural landscaping, a lagoon system and permeable paving.  Throughout the process of updating the campus, the goal has been to set an example of what is possible in innovative, passive design . As a result, the project meets qualifications for six of the most desired certifications in green design. These include the Living Building Challenge, LEED Platinum, First SITES™ Platinum and First WELL Building Platinum as well as the achievement of the first certified BREEAM Outstanding In-Use Building in the United States award. The conservatory has also earned a Fitwel three-star rating. The Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens invites visitors to wander through the campus, taking in the rain gardens, lagoon and atrium with lush greenery and native plants throughout. In fact, the conservatory has an obligation to promote green building practices with a central focus on merging human activities and nature in a sustainable way. According to a conservatory officials, “As Phipps’ education, research and administration facility, the CSL is an integral part of the Phipps visitor experience as a ‘living museum,’ focusing attention on the important intersection between the built and natural environments, and demonstrating that human and environmental health are inextricably connected.” + Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Images via Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

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Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens LEEDs the way in green design

KAJ Hotel is a one-room boathouse rental that exudes hygge

July 7, 2021 by  
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The Danish idea of hygge brings “a quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being.” Why wouldn’t you want to have more of that in your life? At KAJ Hotel, you can. Kaj is a traditional Danish name that also means ‘quay’ or ‘wharf’. The name and the association with hygge are appropriate in the rental that is not a hotel or a houseboat but a memorable lodging on the harbor in central Copenhagen, Denmark. It provides a unique visitor experience as a one-room boathouse and tiny home . It even comes with an extra boat. Related: These floating, 3D-printed private offices have no land impact The project came to light when business and life partners Barbara von Haffner and Toke Larsen commissioned architect Karl Smith Meyer to help develop the plan. The couple have their own houseboat, which they used as a prefabrication point for part of the KAJ lodging. With copious inquiries about what it was like living on a houseboat , they decided to give others the experience firsthand. KAJ Hotel technically has no footprint, perched over the edge of the harbor, but it also avoids a heavy carbon footprint with the use of reclaimed materials. The majority of the mini-rental is built using wood, and there was minimal site impact by craning the prefabricated pieces into place.  Window frames were upcycled from the previous Danish Defense Command building. Old railroad poles were used in the foundation, and recycled materials from a ship were used to build the stairs and gangway.  The tiny abode delivers big on interior design with a traditional Danish feel. Known for a modern minimalism vibe, the Scandinavian-style lightly-colored wood ceilings, walls, floors and furniture are complemented by white walls and window frames for a neutral color palette that doesn’t distract from the natural surroundings just steps away. The micro-hotel provides a countertop/desk area, bathroom with portal window, a primary bedroom and additional sleeping spaces all within a 16-square-meter room.  Along the water’s edge, visitors can take in the opportunity for leisurely or quick swimming, sunbathing or enjoying views of the nearby tourist attractions. Unlike a hotel, you’ll have no one sharing the space, yet amenities like the provided porridge, coffee and tea deliver the comforts of home.  + KAJ Hotel Via Wallpaper Images via KAJ Hotel

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KAJ Hotel is a one-room boathouse rental that exudes hygge

KAJ Hotel is a one-room boathouse rental that exudes hygge

July 7, 2021 by  
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The Danish idea of hygge brings “a quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being.” Why wouldn’t you want to have more of that in your life? At KAJ Hotel, you can. Kaj is a traditional Danish name that also means ‘quay’ or ‘wharf’. The name and the association with hygge are appropriate in the rental that is not a hotel or a houseboat but a memorable lodging on the harbor in central Copenhagen, Denmark. It provides a unique visitor experience as a one-room boathouse and tiny home . It even comes with an extra boat. Related: These floating, 3D-printed private offices have no land impact The project came to light when business and life partners Barbara von Haffner and Toke Larsen commissioned architect Karl Smith Meyer to help develop the plan. The couple have their own houseboat, which they used as a prefabrication point for part of the KAJ lodging. With copious inquiries about what it was like living on a houseboat , they decided to give others the experience firsthand. KAJ Hotel technically has no footprint, perched over the edge of the harbor, but it also avoids a heavy carbon footprint with the use of reclaimed materials. The majority of the mini-rental is built using wood, and there was minimal site impact by craning the prefabricated pieces into place.  Window frames were upcycled from the previous Danish Defense Command building. Old railroad poles were used in the foundation, and recycled materials from a ship were used to build the stairs and gangway.  The tiny abode delivers big on interior design with a traditional Danish feel. Known for a modern minimalism vibe, the Scandinavian-style lightly-colored wood ceilings, walls, floors and furniture are complemented by white walls and window frames for a neutral color palette that doesn’t distract from the natural surroundings just steps away. The micro-hotel provides a countertop/desk area, bathroom with portal window, a primary bedroom and additional sleeping spaces all within a 16-square-meter room.  Along the water’s edge, visitors can take in the opportunity for leisurely or quick swimming, sunbathing or enjoying views of the nearby tourist attractions. Unlike a hotel, you’ll have no one sharing the space, yet amenities like the provided porridge, coffee and tea deliver the comforts of home.  + KAJ Hotel Via Wallpaper Images via KAJ Hotel

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KAJ Hotel is a one-room boathouse rental that exudes hygge

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