VIDEO: Self-flying electric car successfully takes its maiden voyage

April 21, 2017 by  
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Forget the flying cars you’ve seen in sci-fi movies because the air transportation of the future is going to be way better than we imagined – at least, if Lilium Aviation has anything to do with it. The aviation company recently unveiled their all-electric, self-flying car. And while there are quite a few flying car prototypes driving, er, flying around right now, Lilium sets itself apart with its electric engine and vertical takeoff, which the company successfully tested for the first time this week. The vehicle is powered by 36 electric jet engines. Electric powered-flight is just developing, but Lilium has figured out how to make it work in its prototype. “It’s the same battery that you can find in any Tesla,” co-founder Patrick Nathen told The Verge . The battery consumes 90 percent less than current drone aircraft. The craft has a flight speed of 186 mph with a range of 186 miles per charge. Related: AeroMobil is launching a flying car that you can actually buy this year Lilium’s prototype is a two-seater, but the company plans to eventually make a 5-seat vehicle that can be used as an air taxi. For the maiden voyage, the craft was remotely piloted from the ground, but the company is shooting for manned flight night. The final version will be piloted autonomously and you will be able to book a flight using your smartphone, just like a Lyft in the sky. Via The Verge

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VIDEO: Self-flying electric car successfully takes its maiden voyage

Self-Healing Circuits Could Lead to Longer-Lasting Electronics

December 21, 2011 by  
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A team of engineers at the University of Illinois have figured out how to create self-healing circuits in electronics and batteries, a discovery that could lead to longer equipment life and make a nice dent in the piles of e-waste plaguing the planet. As electronics have become more complex, one small circuit failure can render a device useless, especially since it is hard or often impossible to diagnose where that failure occurred to fix it. Nancy Sottos, an engineer working on the project said: “In general there’s not much avenue for manual repair. Sometimes you just can’t get to the inside. In a multilayer integrated circuit, there’s no opening it up. Normally you just replace the whole chip. It’s true for a battery too. You can’t pull a battery apart and try to find the source of the failure.” The solution her team came up with was an army of microcapsules about 10 microns in diameter dispersed along a circuit. When a crack occurs in the circuit, the microcapsules break open and release a liquid metal that fills in the crack and restores the electrical flow. The time between a failure and the microcapsules filling the crack is only a few microseconds. In tests, 90 percent of the samples were healed to 99 percent of their original conductivity. It also require zero human intervention. Only the microcapsules intercepted by a crack opened while the others remained intact. The engineers see this breakthrough as especially useful for air and spacecraft where miles of conductive wire would have to be gone through to diagnose a failure. The team, which originally used microcapsules to create self-healing polymers, want to see what other applications they may have. via Physorg

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Self-Healing Circuits Could Lead to Longer-Lasting Electronics

Solar Cells Can Now Be Printed on Anything, Even Paper and Fabric

July 12, 2011 by  
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Photo by Patrick Gillooly via MIT News Researchers at MIT have figured out how to print photovoltaic cells on every-day materials like paper or fabric — and the process is practically the same is printing this article out on your desk printer. …

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Solar Cells Can Now Be Printed on Anything, Even Paper and Fabric

Watching The Dismantling Of Everything Green In Toronto

July 12, 2011 by  
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Image credit Lloyd Alter When Rob Ford was running for Mayor of Toronto, he complained about the “gravy train” of waste, and promised that he would balance the budget without any service cutbacks. Now he is Mayor, and the first report is in from KPMG, and we see that there is no gravy train of waste, and about the only place to save money is to strip out just about every green and environmental program that the city ever had. Recommendations include: “Reducing the scale” of cycling infrastructure: The report suggests that “Bicycle Plan and Program are more extensive than warranted by bicycle volumes.” This is of course a chicken an..

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Watching The Dismantling Of Everything Green In Toronto

Meet Double Impact’s Biggest Contributors

July 12, 2011 by  
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After a few weeks of Double Impact , we’re taking a look at who is making the biggest contributions. We asked the top 4 Double Impact users to share why they care about the planet and how they are using Double Impact to make their lives a little greener

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Meet Double Impact’s Biggest Contributors

UN Moves Forward with Ambitious Plan to Clean Up Lake Victoria

July 12, 2011 by  
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Photo: Tony Young under a Creative Commons license . Lake Victoria is vital to the livelihood of about 30 million people in East Africa. But as the region urbanizes, pollution levels in the lake have increased and access to clean water for disadvantaged populations is far from a sure thing

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UN Moves Forward with Ambitious Plan to Clean Up Lake Victoria

The Last 100 Years in Fuel Efficiency (Infographic)

May 7, 2011 by  
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Created By WellHome Energy Audits and Insulation Take a looksy at this cute little chart, if only to see how little progress there’s been in fuel efficiency over the last 100 years. As you can see, we figured out how to produce cars that get 40 or so mpg some 60 years ago. And only in the last few years have we really started improving on that ….

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The Last 100 Years in Fuel Efficiency (Infographic)

The 11 Most Walkable Cities in the U.S.

May 6, 2011 by  
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Photo: Crystian Cruz , Flickr, CC The Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center has release its list of the most pedestrian-friendly cities in the US, with 11 getting rankings from Platinum to Bronze and 8 more getting ‘honorable mentions’. Only one city received the highest honor.

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The 11 Most Walkable Cities in the U.S.

“Rock Breathing” Bacteria Could Help Soak Up Oil Spill in Gulf

May 4, 2010 by  
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A mind blowing discovery has been made by scientists at East Anglia University in the UK. They’ve figured out how “rock breathing” bacteria — yes you read that correctly — that live below the Earth’s surface survive by, well, breathing rocks. In a recently released study they describe how these nifty microscopic organisms could be a huge help in cleaning up oil spills like the Deepwater Horizon disaster

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“Rock Breathing” Bacteria Could Help Soak Up Oil Spill in Gulf

Biomimicry in Medicine: Sharkskin-Inspired Material Stops Bacterial Breakouts

October 30, 2009 by  
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Image via PopSci Sharklet Technologies, a Florida-based biotech company, has figured out a way to capitalize on shark skin – specifically on the way parasites and bacteria can’t stick to sharks.

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Biomimicry in Medicine: Sharkskin-Inspired Material Stops Bacterial Breakouts

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