Hurricane-resistant home uses resilient boat-building techniques to weather the storm

June 28, 2018 by  
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In the wake of Hurricane Sandy , American firm Specht Architects designed the Beach Haven House, a contemporary home built to withstand hurricanes and harsh weather. Crafted with boat-building techniques and materials, the resilient beachfront house in New Jersey’s Long Beach Island serves as a weekend getaway for a family of five. The elevated 2,500-square-foot home is wrapped in two types of cedar siding and features a fiberglass roof, stainless steel exterior components and large panes of hurricane-grade glass that frame views of the surroundings. When Hurricane Sandy ravaged the Northeast U.S., Specht Architects had already started on a renovation project in New Jersey’s Beach Haven community. In the wake of the superstorm however, new beachfront regulations enacted by FEMA forced the architects to begin the design anew in order to meet revised requirements. “The challenge was to create something open and light-filled that takes advantage of its beautiful setting, yet uses every available square inch of buildable area allowed by law,” explained Specht Architects, citing the many code-regulated square-footage and height restrictions. The home is elevated on stilts to comply with FEMA’s Base Flood Elevation and sits atop a carport lined with gravel. To allow the home to embrace the outdoors, the architects added large windows, balconies and tear-away panels. A stairway on the south side of the home leads up to the second floor that primarily houses the communal areas. An open-plan kitchen, dining room and living area — which also open up to a shaded balcony — occupy much of this floor. The second floor also consists of a flex room that can be used as an en suite guest room or office space, a TV lounge area and a hot tub. Related: Specht Architects’ Sundial House is a sculptural extension of the desert landscape On the side of the living area is a sculptural open tread timber staircase that leads up to the third floor and overlooks views of the ocean through floor-to-ceiling windows. On the east side of the upper floor is the en suite master bedroom that connects to a balcony and faces sunrise ocean views. The floor also houses three children’s bedrooms — each uniquely styled like a “ship’s cabin” — and a shared bathroom on the far west side. + Specht Architects Images by Taggart Sorensen

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Hurricane-resistant home uses resilient boat-building techniques to weather the storm

This tiny timber cabin was built from construction waste for under $30K

April 2, 2018 by  
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Transportable, versatile, and low-cost, this tiny timber cabin shows how crafty use of local and recycled materials can lead to impressive results. UK architecture firm Invisible Studio designed and built this mobile prototype using a combination of construction waste and locally grown unseasoned timber for just £20,000 ($28,105 USD). Called Trailer, the multifunctional structure follows in the footsteps of Invisible Studio’s previous projects, such as the Ghost Barn and their own studio space , both of which were built from timber sustainably grown and managed on site. Located in the woods near Invisible Studio’s workspace, the 430-square-foot Trailer project gets its name from the trailer the built structure sits on. The architects designed the building so that it can be legally transported on a public highway and added a removable wheeled “bogey” beneath the steel chassis for ease of use. “The project aims to provide a super low cost, versatile, useable space that could act as a kit of parts for any self builder to improvise around or easily adapt,” wrote Invisible Studio. “While conceived as a domestic space, it could easily function as a workspace or something else.” Related: Ghost Barn built of locally felled timber glows like a lantern at night Corrugated fiberglass and steel clad the building, while high-performance interlocking polycarbonate panels cover the two gabled ends to allow an ample amount of natural light indoors. The interior is lined in used shuttering plywood and all the joinery, including the two staircases, is crafted from plywood offcuts. Leftover blue rope, sourced from a previous project, is used for the handrails. The doors and insulation were also reclaimed and the roof lights were purchased as factory seconds. To reduce milling costs, the architects used timber of the “same section,” meaning timber was cut into 125 millimeter-by-50-millimeter pieces and then laminated up into the structural sections for the cross frames. + Invisible Studio Via Dezeen Images by Piers Taylor

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This tiny timber cabin was built from construction waste for under $30K

BIG unveils dreamlike ‘unzipped’ Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London

June 7, 2016 by  
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Located in front of the Serpentine Galleries in Kensington Gardens, BIG’s “unzipped wall” pavilion is made of fiberglass boxes piled on top on one another. The fiberglass boxes are translucent, allowing light to permeate the inventive space. According to a statement from the Serpentine Galleries, BIG’s pavilion “is a soaring and curvaceous structure that returns to one of architecture’s most basic elements: the brick wall, resulting in a dramatic shift between a straight line and a three-dimensional space.” Related: BIG selected to design the 2016 Serpentine Pavilion Ingels’ dreamlike pavilion looks different depending on a viewer’s angle. From one side, it appears to be simply a rectangle, and from another, it appears as an ” undulating ” structure. Visitors will be allowed to climb the fiberglass blocks up to a metal wire in place. Ingels said , “I think we tried to make a structure, that in an effortless way, combines a lot of differences. So it’s a wall that becomes a hall inside, it’s a gate to the Serpentine Gallery, but it also creates a space for events.” During the day, a cafe will provide refreshments to visitors in the pavilion. During the evening, it will serve as a performance space for musicians, writers, and artists. Ingels also cited Sydney Opera House architect Jørn Utzon as inspiration. He said , “Utzon had this idea that you could create any imaginable form with carefully designed, mass-produced elements, almost like creating difference out of repetition, and it’s essentially the spirit we’ve tried to bring here.” According to Dezeen, this is the 16th structure that the gallery has commissioned. Each architect they have selected has not yet finished a ” significant building ” in the UK. The first structure was designed by Zaha Hadid back in 2000. + Bjarke Ingels Group + Serpentine Galleries Via Dezeen Images courtesy of Serpentine Galleries , © Iwan Baan

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BIG unveils dreamlike ‘unzipped’ Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London

Temperature-regulating Thermo Tents offer the most comfortable camping experience ever

March 26, 2015 by  
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Summer is coming and we can’t wait to go camping ! However, those freezing nights and hot mornings can suck the fun out of the experience and make the most adventurous people grumpy. Irish firm Thermo Tent designs well-insulated camping tents that maintain constant internal temperatures and muffle noise transfer from the outside, as well as the inside. The technology they use reduces the spikes in temperature which usually occur with regular tents, making the camping experience more fun for everyone. Read the rest of Temperature-regulating Thermo Tents offer the most comfortable camping experience ever Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: camping , camping season , comfort camping , comfortable camping , eco camping , fiberglass , glamping , insulated tent , insulated tents , insulating camping tents , Ireland , Irish Thermo Tent , kickstarter , kickstarter campaign , lightweight structure , temperature regulated panels , temperature-regulating tent , tent design , thermally insulated material , Thermo Tent , tunnel tents

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Temperature-regulating Thermo Tents offer the most comfortable camping experience ever

Should Batt Insulation Be Outlawed?

October 13, 2010 by  
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Image Credit Carl Seville Fiberglass has never been my favourite insulation, and I got really upset with Owens Cornings’s “Pink is Green” advertising campaign a few years ago, noting that there is more to being green than simply saving energy. But I had to concede that it was cheap and if properly installed, safe, inert and effective. But Carl Seville at Green Building Advisor won’t even go that far; He thinks batt insul…

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Should Batt Insulation Be Outlawed?

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