Pop-up shipping container accommodations add a bit of luxury to local festivals

June 18, 2019 by  
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For those who aren’t exactly in the mood to sleep in a dusty old tent on the ground while they attend a weekend music festival, Caboose & Co. has a better alternative. The West Sussex-based company is providing events around the world with a more sustainable accommodation option in the form of luxury glamping pods made out of shipping containers . After realizing that many event organizers are often hard-pressed to provide decent on-site lodging for event attendees, the Caboose & Co. team decided to create a sustainable solution that would also provide a taste of luxury. Today, the portable Cabooses can be easily transported to events around the globe by truck, train or ship. Related: Treehouses made from shipping containers offer the ultimate glamping getaway in Portugal The company provides two types of glamping pods , both made out of repurposed shipping containers. The first is the Rocket, a two-bedroom container that sleeps up to four people. The elongated container has two sundecks on either end with plenty of seating, perfect for enjoying some outdoor time. The interior of the Rocket shipping container features a modern design. The living space is compact but comfortable with en suite bunk bedrooms and a small bathroom with a shower and flushing toilet. The second glamping pod is called The Scotsman, which is a smaller, one-bedroom pod that sleeps up to two people. Like the Rocket, the pod has a large sun terrace that leads to the interior space. There is a double bed with a comfortable mattress as well as a small bathroom. Both containers come with electricity and hot water. Since its inception, Caboose & Co. has been making a name for itself as the go-to company for festival accommodation . It recently set up a pop-up hotel at Cheltenham Festival and will also be on-site at a number of upcoming events such as the Hay Festival, Glastonbury and more. + Caboose & Co. Images via Caboose & Co.

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Pop-up shipping container accommodations add a bit of luxury to local festivals

Pick Sustainable Music Festivals

October 15, 2018 by  
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It’s no secret that music festivals are big business these … The post Pick Sustainable Music Festivals appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Pick Sustainable Music Festivals

Toyota to Expand Production of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

October 15, 2018 by  
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While Nissan and Tesla have put their money on electric … The post Toyota to Expand Production of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles appeared first on Earth911.com.

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How ‘diversion architecture’ will make outdoor concert festivals more sustainable

May 20, 2016 by  
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Everyone looks forward to outdoor music festivals, but most large scale gatherings contribute a staggering amount of waste. That’s why every year Happy Valley, Oregon hosts The Pickathon Music Festival, one of the world’s most sustainable concert events. Pickathon has taken the waste-free concept very seriously ; building stages from recycled or recyclable materials, eliminating bottled water and plastic utensils, and providing an EcoShuttle service to and from the grounds. Partnering with The Diversion Design/Build Studio at Portland State University’s School of Architecture , Pickathon’s student-led experiment explores a new wave of sustainable design: Diversion Architecture. The concept shows that collective gatherings need not require an enormous carbon footprint ; it just requires thoughtful design. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3Al_646xss&feature=youtu.be Grandparents perform Grandparents “Kids In The Alley” on the Pickathon Tree-Line Stage at Pendarvis Farm. For the past 4 years, Portland State University’s Diversion Design and Build Studio student-led design experiment has partnered with Pickathon, focusing on two core strategies: the diversion of non-typical, re-used materials, and the diversion of non-typical experiences like those embodied in festival gatherings. RELATED: Portland architecture students build incredible outdoor stage from 520 recycled pallets The Pickathon story involves a constant re-thinking about the way we use materials and how we might minimize consumption. A telling example of this design process was the move to eliminate bottled water from the weekend festival (likely the highest grossing line-item at a typical summer music festival). In order to eliminate bottled water, Pickathon decided to truck-in drinking water and offer it free of charge to anyone bringing their own cup. Further, in order to eliminate the use of plastic cups, Pickathon designed a special stainless steel pint mug that could be used for water but which would also be the sole vessel allowed for beer purchases; give them your cup, they’ll fill it with beer. This simple design change immediately eliminated both plastic water bottles and plastic cups from the festival, and created a remarkable fully-embraced culture around the thoughtful re-use of everyday items. The stainless steel cups are re-used year after year. Silverware, tableware, and indeed architecture soon followed suit. Image © Dylan Vanweelden It is important to note that the goals of Pickathon should not be primarily understood as the desire to design a sustainable music festival, but as the desire to design a relevant, responsible and thrilling community experience of contemporary music. The founders of Pickathon , now in its 16th year, continue to insist upon a creative agenda in all aspects of the event. As they state: Since day one, the idea behind Pickathon has always been pretty simple: what does it take to be the best weekend festival of the year for music lovers? …Innovation has always been at the center of this process and through the years many important elements have come together; collaborating widely on yearly, diverse lineups that are built on the idea of great music being the sole criteria; refining six unique performance venues designed to create juxtaposing alternate realities; ….maintaining a low crowd density; becoming the only large music festival to eliminate plastic and minimize single use items; recruiting the finest food and drink purveyors in the land; focusing constantly on eliminating “normal” festival hassles; enabling families to thrive. This attitude mirrors that of Portland State University with regards to sustainable architecture; sustainable design must be poetically engaged in the material human world or risk being irrelevant to the human dilemma on this planet. Image © Tim LaBarge With these innovations to the typical music festival already churning away, Pickathon approached the PSU School of Architecture with the challenge to design and implement a 1,000-person performance area as an addition to the existing festival infrastructure. This new performance space, named the Tree-Line Stage , had four primary design criteria: • To continue Pickathon’s philosophy of high-experiential impact coupled with low-environmental impact. • The site was to be returned to its found condition, an idyllic meadow leaning gently towards the horizon of the Cascades. • Costs to be kept to an absolute minimum. • The performance area needed to be a completely new design, every year, in order to keep the concepts of low-impact design at the front of the community’s mind. The Diversion Design/Build Studio is currently designing a new Tree-Line Stage for the 2016 Pickathon Festival and will soon be sharing the design process with you. Inhabitat readers will have a special opportunity to vote for the initiating re-used material, design intentions, and experiential effects – stay tuned for this exciting series. + The Diversion Design/Build Studio at Portland State University Travis Bell is Assistant Professor in Ecological Design at Portland State University’s School of Architecture teaching lecture courses, design studios, and design/build courses. Travis’ primary interest lies in making architecture that is in closer alignment with the natural patterns of our environment. This primary interest grounds a research, teaching and design agenda focused on appropriate material choice, the prioritization of authentic craftsmanship, passive systems design, adapted historical technologies, explorations in Critical Regionalism and temporary architectural solutions.

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Glowing seesaws turn Montreal into a musical winter wonderland

December 20, 2015 by  
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Seesaws aren’t just for kiddie playgrounds anymore. Just ask Lateral Office and CS Design , two Canada-based design firms who collaborated with engineer EGP Group to install Impulse, a collection of 30 glowing, musical seesaws in Montreal. Created for Luminothérapie at Place des Festivals, the LED -fitted seesaws vary in size and play music as they’re used. READ MORE>

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Glowing seesaws turn Montreal into a musical winter wonderland

Eindhoven’s annual Glow Festival set the city aglow with hundreds of LED installations

December 7, 2015 by  
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Festival Owner Launches Massive Private Solar Power Plant

November 11, 2010 by  
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Image credit: Glastonbury Festivals From wind- and solar-powered phone charging stations , to providing a platform for Greenpeace and Joss Stone to call out climate criminals , Glastonbury Festival in the UK has always had a dark green tint to it. Now festival founder Michael Eavis has taken his ecological commitments a step further—launching the UK’s largest private solar po… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Festival Owner Launches Massive Private Solar Power Plant

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