Street artist constructs gigantic geometric portraits with reclaimed wood

April 14, 2017 by  
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Belgian street artist Stefaan De Croock (a.k.a. Strook ) just unveiled a gigantic portrait made entirely out of reclaimed wood . Working with wood fragments of various shapes, sizes and colors, the artist created the enormous 30-foot-high portrait on the side of a high-rise for the Crystal Ship Arts Festival in Ostend, Belgium. The large art piece was created with reclaimed wood pieces sourced from old homes, studios, boats, and even a shipwreck. Using the wood’s original color palette and natural textures as a guide, the artist painstakingly created a beautiful female form. Related: Italian artist creates extraordinary sculptures out of reclaimed driftwood The artist and graphic designer is well-known for his creative street art and was commissioned this year by the arts festival to create a large-scale piece. Strook’s portrait is one of many art pieces on display by some 20 international and local artists who were invited to attend the festival. + Strook Via This is Colossal Photography by Sasha Bogojev for Arrested Motion

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Street artist constructs gigantic geometric portraits with reclaimed wood

Senate Republicans could save methane rules from Trump

April 14, 2017 by  
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President Donald Trump is facing opposition to his rolling back of environmental regulations. Of course climate activists and Democrats are fighting back against the administration’s attempts to undermine Obama-era rules on everything from fuel efficiency standards to preventing coal ash from being dumped in rivers. On at least one Trump action however, it is Republicans in the Senate who are pushing back — a bill to overturn a methane regulation for public lands has stalled in the Senate (it passed the GOP-controlled House in February) because, according to reporting from Mother Jones , “a number of moderate and Western state Republican senators have worried about the implications of permanently restricting the Interior Department’s ability to regulate methane emissions.” Methane is a powerful, although short-lived, greenhouse gas with at least 86 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide over a time span of 20 years in the atmosphere and 34 times the strength of CO2 over a 100-year time scale. The Interior Department’s methane and natural gas rule limits the release of methane from oil and gas operations on public lands. The natural gas is wasted through leaks, intentional venting, or burning off the gas — a process known as flaring. Related: House Republicans move to make methane pollution great again Some Senate Republicans are hedging on repealing the methane rules because of the permanency of the Congressional Review Act (CRA) that allows for Congress to overturn federal rulemaking with a simple majority vote. In other words, the CRA blocks federal agencies from putting forward similar rules at any point in the future, meaning the Bureau of Land Management might not ever be able to regulate methane pollution on public lands no matter who sits in the White House or what party controls Congress. A recent survey by Citizens for Responsible Energy Solutions found strong support for current federal methane regulations aimed at reducing natural gas emissions. “The idea that conservatives would be attacking a waste reduction measure is kind of bizarre,” the Wilderness Society’s deputy director of energy and climate, Josh Mantell, told Mother Jones. Via Mother Jones Images via Flickr 1 , 2

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Senate Republicans could save methane rules from Trump

These incredible lights look exactly like giant soap bubbles

March 28, 2017 by  
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Dutch designers Martens & Visser created a collection of mesmerizing kinetic objects that rotate and reflect light and color like massive soap bubbles floating through the air. The ‘Reflecting HOLONS’  may look like fragile bubbles that could pop at any moment, but they are made from razor-thin iridescent plastic strips attached to an axis. As the axis rotates they change shape, revealing all the colors of the rainbow in a constantly-evolving light show. https://vimeo.com/145396389#at=5 Jetske Visser and Michiel Martens aimed to investigate the refracting and reflecting properties of light and color through their unique Holons. As they reflect the light around them, the Holons glow, while the refracted light spreads out in different wavelengths, revealing all seven colors of the rainbow on the walls, ceiling and floor around them. The spheres were carefully crafted from thin strips of transparent iridescent plastic attached to a metallic rotating axis suspended from the ceiling. Watch the video below to see them in action. Related: Eindhoven’s annual Glow Festival set the city aglow with hundreds of LED installations Jetske Visser and Michiel Martens  aimed to investigate the refracting and reflecting properties of light and color through their unique Holons. As they reflect the light around them, the Holons glow, while the  refracted light spreads out in different wavelengths, revealing all seven colors of the rainbow on the walls, ceiling and floor around them. The spheres were carefully crafted from thin strips of transparent iridescent plastic attached to a metallic rotating axis suspended from the ceiling. Watch the video below to see them in action. The rotating axis is powered by a spinning electronic motor that makes the Holons look like soap bubbles as they float and dance in the air. The kinetic pieces were first commissioned by Eindhoven art space MU  and displayed during last year’s Glow festival of light. More recently they were shown at a converted Philips factory, creating an immersive landscape during last year’s  Dutch Design Week . Visser and Martens say the Holons look so real, visitors are constantly wanting to blow them through the air and pop them. + Martens & Visser Photos by Ana Lisa Alperovich for Inhabitat and  Boudewijn Bollmann

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These incredible lights look exactly like giant soap bubbles

Special Announcement: The Sustainability Solutions Celebration

February 23, 2017 by  
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ASU, with the help of some special guests, previews the Sustainability Solutions Celebration, presented as part of the Sustainability Solutions Festival hosted by the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability.

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Special Announcement: The Sustainability Solutions Celebration

Rethinking the Water Cycle for a Water Quality Constrained World

February 23, 2017 by  
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Global water scarcity is a function of the compounding impacts of decreasing availability and declining quality. The impacts of these factors on business are complex and far reaching. Succeeding in a water quality constrained world requires the ingenuity of business to drive water strategies that go beyond conservation to reuse, recycling and stewardship.  Ecolab vice president of sustainability Emilio Tenuta will outline imperatives for achieving business resilience  amidst water scarcity.

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Rethinking the Water Cycle for a Water Quality Constrained World

Connecting Nature & People

February 23, 2017 by  
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Connecting Nature & People

Can Re-greening the Planet Make Commercial Sense?

February 23, 2017 by  
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Natural systems – forests, grasslands, and wetlands – can deliver over a third of the mitigation needed to meet the Paris Agreement’s 2 °C target, a critical biological bridge in the next two decades. Growth in demand for natural resources will put unprecedented pressure on our planet, but it also brings opportunity for economic growth and value creation.

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Can Re-greening the Planet Make Commercial Sense?

Punah Project recycles industrial waste into fashion-forward accessories

September 27, 2016 by  
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It’s not often that manufacturing companies are overly concerned with the environmental impact of their excessive waste , but one of India’s largest manufacturing conglomerates, Godrej & Boyce , is shrewdly turning theirs into a fashion-forward gold mine. Under the initiative Punah Project , the company has created a circular economy by converting their industrial waste into swanky new products like metal shoes and handbags, which were recently on display at Tent London during London Design Festival . It’s estimated that Godrej & Boyce industries generate approximately 18,505 tonnes of waste materials annually, all of which have previously gone straight into landfills and incinerators. This process is not only damaging to the environment, but also a complete misuse of potential materials. Related: Glitter Without Guilt: Ethical Rings Created from Recycled Precious Metals Focusing on “re-thinking the definition of waste and the use of waste materials”, the Punah Project team has created a sustainable manufacturing process that separates waste into six categories of recyclables: oils, metals, wood, chemical, paper, and electronic materials. The potential value of each material is evaluated based on its natural properties and versatility. A variety of new products are then created using as little energy as possible. The results, which were recently on display at the London Design Festival, include fashion-forward items like kicky metal shoes and hand clutches made with leftover metal crimping pieces. Mr. Hemmant Jha, Chief Design Officer, Godrej & Boyce, said the company’s zero-waste process not only works to reduce waste in landfills, but also benefits local economies. He added: “As initiators of The Punah Project, we are focusing on developing alternative applications for non-hazardous industrial waste through material design and research. We aim to adopt a zero-waste policy across all the Godrej & Boyce manufacturing sites. We are happy to have displayed the applications that are a result of our extensive research on over 600 materials and several collaborations with different manufacturing teams at Godrej & Boyce as well as skilled craftsmen and designers across India.” + Punah Project + London Design Festival + Inhabitat coverage of London Design Festival

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Punah Project recycles industrial waste into fashion-forward accessories

Blackbodys luminous LED FIRE RING turns head at London Design 2016

September 26, 2016 by  
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There is a lot to soak in at the London Design Festival , yet the sparkling FIRE RING display by Blackbody catches the eye immediately. Luminous OLED lights of varying colors hang delicately from overhead, mimicking the dance between warm and cool hues seen in a flickering flame. Blackbody has impressed us before with its dazzling installations at the Milan Furniture Fair and ICFF in 2013 , as well as at Wanted Design 2014 . They do not disappoint with their latest creation, which is similar in design to the renewed I.RAIN product series. The use of 100 percent recyclable Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) fixtures means a lightweight, glare-free, and heat-free glow that is as environmentally responsible as it is beautiful. Related: Blackbody’s stunning OLED chandeliers welcome visitors to Wanted Design 2014 Each member of the I.RAIN family can be customized in a variety of finishes: white painted brass, brass, glass, copper, chrome and black nickel. The unique design of FIRE RING , however, is like no other, producing the imagery of “a fire projecting numbers of sparks.” We spotted the stunning display at designjunction , in its newly relocated spot in King’s Cross. +Blackbody + London Design Festival Images via Inhabitat,  Maison & Objet

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Blackbodys luminous LED FIRE RING turns head at London Design 2016

Eyesore garage transformed into a stunning waterfall illusion in Lithuania

September 20, 2016 by  
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The 4th annual Vilnius Street Art Festival in Lithuania is all about changing perceptions of existing city structures. The Vilnius Waterfall project revamps an old, riverside Soviet building from a concrete eyesore into a striking facade of rushing, tumbling waters, thanks to the creativity of street artist Ignas Lukauskas and Studio Vieta . The building belongs to the Lithuanian Parliament, housing and maintaining government-owned cars, yet the plain structure right on the Neris River has never been a dazzling addition to the cityscape. The addition of the lively, crashing waterfall image across the 2000-square-meter-exterior, albeit temporarily, completely changes the view from the river. Related: Street artist makes this Lithuania trolleybus vanish for a fleeting moment every day Artist Ignas Lukauskas based the project on the topic of his Ph.D. thesis that explores how art and architecture can disrupt urban landscapes. Water seems to flow naturally from the descending structures into the river, creating a unique and visually intriguing connection between manmade creation and Earth’s natural splendor. The Vilnius Waterfall is the one of the largest pieces ever curated for the street art festival, where the Vanishing Trolleybus by artist Liudas Parulskis was also featured. +Studio Vieta Images via Studio Vieta

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Eyesore garage transformed into a stunning waterfall illusion in Lithuania

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