Brasserie 2050 restaurant pops up as a prototype for sustainable food service

May 21, 2019 by  
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As the push toward sustainable lifestyles continues to spread from individual purchasing decisions to the overarching responsibility of big business, one restaurant is making a big statement by providing meals from a circular environment of zero food and material waste . The Brasserie 2050 restaurant in the Netherlands temporarily opened its doors last fall as a restaurant and food storage pavilion designed by temporary-structure specialists Overtreders W for an event called the Lowlands Festival. The goal was to highlight the need for sustainable food production, and they achieved this goal by setting up a food barn made from recycled and borrowed materials that could be disassembled and moved at the end of the festival with no damage to the materials and no waste. Related: An urban farm and restaurant fluorishes in Utrecht’s “circular” pavilion With forecasts estimating the world will have 10 billion people to feed by 2050, Brasserie 2050 is a testament to how we can achieve that goal. Not only is the design of the structure a sustainable model, but the catering company The Food Line Up created a zero-waste menu to feed the masses in attendance of the festival. Creative use of kitchen scraps culminated into baked bread from potato peelings, steak tartare with half the meat and pesto sourced from kitchen leftovers. The food pavilion made use of the entire barn-shaped space by using standard pallet racks as the primary structural component. A corrugated plastic roof completed the gabled look. Even the tables were constructed from recycled plastic with the reuse and zero-waste cycle in mind. The space was efficiently filled from top to bottom, with suspended herb boxes and wheat, corn, garlic and onions dangling from the ceiling above diner’s heads. Of course, this also provided natural decor for the restaurant . To keep the structure from blowing away, bags of grain weighed down the sides. The structure and the menu served as a model of efficient and sustainable practices designed to lead us toward more eco-friendly food services for the future. + Overtreders W Via ArchDaily Photography by Jorn van Eck via Overtreders W

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Brasserie 2050 restaurant pops up as a prototype for sustainable food service

Zaha Hadids 2022 World Cup stadium in Qatar adapts for future use

May 21, 2019 by  
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After six years in the making, Qatar has finally inaugurated Al Janoub Stadium, the country’s first purpose-built stadium for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects in collaboration with AECOM, the stadium’s eye-catching pleated shape takes inspiration from the hulls of dhows, the traditional boat of the region. To ensure long-term use by the community, the stadium includes demountable seats and temporary concessions that can be removed for post-World Cup events. Located in Al Wakrah, a city 20 kilometers south of Doha, the Al Janoub Stadium is a 40,000-seat football stadium that can be reduced to 20,000 seats after the 2022 FIFA World Cup to better serve the community; the removed seats can be transported to a developing country in need of sporting infrastructure. “The stadium was designed in conjunction with a new precinct so that it sits at the heart of an urban extension of the city, creating community-based activities in and around the stadium on non-event days,” Zaha Hadid Architects explained. “Al Janoub stadium will be a memorable venue and destination during the Qatar 2022 FIFA World Cup and afterwards, at the center of its Al Wakrah community.” The stadium is further grounded into the local context with its boat-inspired design that reflects the maritime traditions and history of Al Wakrah, while the stadium’s operable roof, designed by Schlaich Bergermann Partner, mimics a sail and is built from pleated PTFE fabric and cables to match the cladding. The opaque roof and walls are articulated as pleated cross sections in a nod to Arabic motifs and calligraphy. The stadium’s white and off-white glossy surface finish evokes seashells. Related: Qatar unveils first-ever FIFA World Cup stadium to be built from shipping containers In addition to the operable roof, the designers also ensure player and spectator comfort with passive design principles , computer modeling, wind tunnel tests and seating bowl cooling. + Zaha Hadid Architects Photography by Hufton+Crow via Zaha Hadid Architects

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Zaha Hadids 2022 World Cup stadium in Qatar adapts for future use

A modern farmstay suite minimizes site impact in Brazil

May 21, 2019 by  
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In the state of Paraná in the south of Brazil, architect Bruno Zaitter has created a contemporary and low-impact suite for the charming Hotel Fazenda Cainã in the countryside. Dubbed the Refúgio da Cainã, the building features walls of glass to take in sweeping views of the native forest, surrounding mountains and the city of Curitiba in the far distance. Elevated to reduce site impact, the prefab structure includes a repurposed container measuring nearly 40 feet in length. Spanning an area of 538 square feet, the modern Refúgio da Cainã has been dubbed by Hotel Fazenda Cainã as their Hannah Arendt suite after the renowned American philosopher and political theorist. Included in their Villa do Bosque collection, the contemporary chalet is equipped with full-height windows for taking in views of the large native forest to the south, as well as city and valley views towards the east. The streamlined interiors are dressed with a natural materials palette that complements the outdoors. “In this natural space marked by a wide green area and the characteristic geology of the site, the Refúgio da Cainã contemplates a simplistic structural concept that reveals the connection of the interior with the exterior by the minimal intervention in the natural environment,” explains the architect, who adds that the hotel is located in the area of a geological fault called the “Escarpa Devoniana.” “It has in its essence, the relation between the artificial structure and the natural universe, where the concept of the project is to harmonize with nature without trying to disguise it, revealing its straight lines as opposed the curved and organic lines of nature.” Related: Site-sensitive Woodhouse Hotel promotes agricultural tourism in Guizhou To reduce environmental impact, the architect reused a nearly 40-foot-long metal container for the bulk of the building, which includes the bathroom on one end, the bedroom in the middle, along with a dining area and living room on the other end. A “glass box” was added to the container and houses a sitting area enclosed on three sides by floor-to-ceiling glazing . The building is elevated with pillars to preserve the natural terrain and minimize site impact. + Bruno Zaitter Images via Bruno Zaitter

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A modern farmstay suite minimizes site impact in Brazil

Twenty aims to dramatically reduce the waste of household products

November 28, 2018 by  
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Dubai Design Week — an annual event celebrating and promoting design and creativity — took place earlier this month, with imaginative minds from all over the world competing for the coveted Progress Prize at the Global Grad Show. This year’s winner, Twenty, sets out to cut down the environmental costs of packaging and shipping household products, like shampoos or cleaners, by offering dry capsules and reusable containers — just add water , and the items are ready for use. Considered to be the largest creative festival in the Middle East, Dubai Design Week takes place at venues throughout the city, with the central hub of the festival being in the Dubai Design District. The competition’s coveted Progress Prize celebrates the next generation of design talent while recognizing the impact of design on society and the environment . Related: How to decode confusing labels on common household cleaners This year, the competition announced Twenty — designed by Mirjam de Bruijn from the Design Academy Eindhoven in The Netherlands — as the winner of the Progress Prize for a collection of dehydrated household products designed to reduce waste and unnecessary emissions by eliminating water content. Judges chose Twenty from 150 selections that came from all over the world, which they then shortlisted to 11 finalists. Since most everyday cleaning products contain at least 80 percent water, Twenty proposes to eliminate the waste and simplify production and transportation with a capsule that you can put into a bottle, add water and then shake to create a cleaning liquid that is just as effective as a store-bought option. “I designed Twenty for people like myself who really want to be sustainable but also have busy lives and need products that are simple, economical, easy to use and fit into their lifestyle,” said de Bruijn. She added that she wants Twenty to be the new standard in household cleaning products, and she is working closely with the university to refine the product while talking to producers and retailers to adopt the perfect strategy for bringing it to market. Brendan McGetrick, the director and curator of the Global Grad Show, said that Twenty is exceptional because it is based on a smart analysis of something that we all need and take for granted. + Twenty Images via Twenty

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Twenty aims to dramatically reduce the waste of household products

Asheville, North Carolina proclaims 7-Day Vegan Challenge

June 5, 2018 by  
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Asheville, North Carolina has announced a week-long vegan challenge. The City of Asheville 7-Day Vegan Challenge invites residents and businesses to eat plant-based foods between June 4 and 10 “to promote good health, animal justice, social justice, environmental justice, and climate justice,” according to a proclamation signed by mayor Esther Manheimer. The city of Asheville describes the effort as the “first ever ‘city-proclaimed’ vegan challenge in the US.” A no-kill animal rescue organization, Brother Wolf Animal Rescue , is spearheading the movement to try out vegan living for a week in Asheville. They’ve made it easier for people to test out veganism by working with Mission Health Weight Management to create a guide with a seven-day meal plan , grocery store shopping list, and tips for going vegan. Sample meals include dishes like a Quinoa Green Goddess Bowl, Carrot Cake Overnight Oats, or Veggie Fajitas. Related: Vegan diets deliver more environmental benefits than sustainable dairy or meat Brother Wolf Animal Rescue is presenting the Asheville VeganFest on June 8 to 10, so the seven-day vegan challenge leads up to the festival. The event’s theme is “to bring awareness to the impacts of global animal agriculture on mass species extinction , climate change , and human health,” according to the challenge’s website, and speakers will discuss “how the transition to the vegan diet is the single most effective change we can make as individuals to help mitigate these crises.” The rescue shelter hopes other cities get involved, too — they’re offering a 7-Day Challenge Start-up Kit including a sample press release, marketing plan, and proclamation; a custom challenge website they’ve created; a guide to securing partnerships and sponsorship; and access to a training webinar. If your city is interested, you can find out more on the 7-Day Vegan Challenge website . + City of Asheville 7-Day Vegan Challenge + City of Asheville Proclamation Images via Depositphotos

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Asheville, North Carolina proclaims 7-Day Vegan Challenge

Ellen MacArthur Foundation: 9 ways to design the circular economy

November 3, 2017 by  
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The EMF offers a glimpse at its online Disruptive Innovation Festival coming Monday.

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Ellen MacArthur Foundation: 9 ways to design the circular economy

Folkets House pavilion is an inclusive space where refugees can learn skills and find jobs

October 10, 2017 by  
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This palm-shaped temporary pavilion recently popped up at the Enskifteshagen Park in Malmö, Sweden , as an inclusive space where refugees and longtime residents of Sweden can learn new skills, find jobs and make connections. The pavilion, named Folkets House (“People’s House), was designed for the Opportunity Space Festival in Malmö, as the winning proposal for the design competition organized by the Van Alen Institute , the City of Malmö, White Arkitekter , Skanska , Individuell Människohjälp , and Architects Sweden. Architects and designers Rik Ekströmof ARExA,  Gustav Fagerström of Walter P Moore,  Milad Barosen of the Milou Group and Nathan King of the Virginia Tech School of Architecture + Design teamed up to design the structure, which was influenced by Swedish 19th-century labor union buildings. Related: Beautiful timber pavilion unfolds like origami The pop-up structure is shaped by curved wooden beams that radiate from its center and shelter a large space under a thin skin. It is meant to host a range of programs, workshops, and other activities organized by Van Alen Institute. At night, the building is transformed into a beautifully lit gathering space where refugees and immigrants can mingle with locals. “We believe that Folkets House will signal the beginning of new opportunities and inspiration for working people of all nations who come together in Malmö — Sweden’s cultural melting pot,” said Rik Ekström of the Folkets House team. + ARExA + Walter P Moore + Milou Group + VT a+d + Van Alen Institute Lead photo by Nazim Benli

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Folkets House pavilion is an inclusive space where refugees can learn skills and find jobs

Singapore Night Festival dazzles crowds with 13 stunning light installations

August 21, 2017 by  
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The Singapore Night Festival is back and it’s pulling out all the stops for its 10th anniversary. Attracting crowds of over 500,000, the annual light festival bonanza transforms the city into a carnival of arts and culture with family-friendly activities, interactive installations, and pop-up eateries across two weekends from August 18 to August 26. Created to follow this year’s theme of “Ten Magical Years,” the iconic Night Lights exhibition brings to life 13 Instagrammable light installations. The Singapore Night Festival comprises five zones sprawled out from Cathay Green and Chijimes to Armenian Street and Waterloo Street. The festival has grown to become Singapore’s largest outdoor performing arts festival and includes artists from a variety of backgrounds, from acrobats to musicians. In celebration of its 10th anniversary, many performing artists that participated in previous years were invited back for the weeklong festival. Related: Amsterdam’s annual Light Festival brightens the city’s winter nights This year’s Night Lights exhibition includes 13 installations , including the signature highlights—interactive light installations that transform the facades of the Singapore Art Museum and the National Museum of Singapore into art. Artists from around the world were invited to create installations, which include EZ3kiel’s Convolutions, Karel Bata’s The Tree That Blinked, and LiteWerkz x 3M’s Tessellations of Time. This year, festivalgoers can also explore the event with free-to-rent bicycles provided by Hello, Bicycle! The festival concludes on August 26. + Singapore Night Festival Images by Singapore Night Festival 2017

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Singapore Night Festival dazzles crowds with 13 stunning light installations

Beautiful timber pavilion unfolds like origami

July 31, 2017 by  
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There’s something irresistibly charming about bringing the paper art of origami to life in large scale. Architects Manuel Bouzas Cavada, Manuel Bouzas Barcala and Clara Álvarez Garcí drew inspiration from folded paper in Origami, a temporary installation for the architecture and design festival Concéntrico 03 in Logroño, Spain. Built of timber panels, this ephemeral pavilion is a beautiful structure that glows from within and delicately unfolds to reveal a multifaceted interior. Selected as the winning proposal for the festival’s information kiosk, Origami is constructed from 39 folded wooden panels joined together with hinges. The Garnica panels are self-supporting and the installation is assembled without any supporting structures or sub-structures—gravity keeps the hinged components in place. Though simple in design, the pavilion is strikingly beautiful thanks to its intricate facade that resembles a bejeweled treasure chest. Related: Larger-than-life pineapple origami structure pops up on a historic UK landscape Gaps between the timber panels allow light to seep through, giving Origami the appearance of a glowing lantern at night. The jury wrote: “The project has been selected for its iconic character and singular geometry, and was highlighted as a landmark in the festival. Based on the concept of pattern and using the technique of origami, the pavilion opens up to its surroundings. Its disposition provokes new interpretations of space and activity in the plaza. The pavilion and its surrounding areas are transformed throughout the day and during the night with the differing light.” + Concéntrico 03 Via ArchDaily Images via Concéntrico 03 Facebook

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Beautiful timber pavilion unfolds like origami

Shocking investigation reveals 70,000 dogs in Bali murdered and served to tourists every year

June 19, 2017 by  
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Each year 70,000 dogs are brutally killed in Bali , Indonesia, according to an investigation spearheaded by Animals Australia (AA). The animals are strangled, bludgeoned, or poisoned and then fed to tourists who think they’re eating chicken meat. AA estimates seven times more dogs are killed in Bali yearly than in the Yulin Dog-Eating Festival in China. Evidence obtained by ABC’s 7.30 program revealed a huge dog meat trade in Bali. An AA undercover investigator spent four months posing as a documentary maker to uncover details about the trade. Known simply as ‘Luke,’ the investigator said he started by getting to know key players in the unregulated industry, and “eventually, they invited me to join them as their gangs stole, hunted, poisoned, and killed dogs.” Related: Dogs raised for meat in South Korea to get forever homes in the US AA campaign director Lyn White said, “Tourists will walk down a street, they’ll see a street store selling satay but what they are not realizing is the letters RW on the store mean it is dog meat being served. They’re just sitting down ordering satay have no idea that they’re eating dog.” And it’s not just street vendors selling the meat to tourists as chicken, but restaurants as well. The Bali Animal Welfare Association, an organization working to rescue the animals from dog traders, has discovered 70 restaurants serving dog meat. It’s not illegal to consume dog meat in Bali. But White said it is illegal to kill animals cruelly or to consume meat tainted with poison. Luke described aggressive methods and said although he’s trained himself to cope with cruelty, in one village where he saw dogs being caught, nothing had prepared him for the brutality. On one occasion he witnessed hunters catching dogs by laying out fish meat laced with cyanide. For the first time in his career, he switched off his camera as he watched a puppy die over agonizing minutes. He said, “I sat stroking him as he died and found myself apologizing for the cruelty of my fellow man.” According to ABC, while some local people think dog meat is healthy, the practice isn’t a long-held tradition. Hindu leader Gusti Ngurah Harta is among those working to end the trade – he said Bali Hindus consider dogs to be a holy animal and that it’s upsetting people are eating them. AA is willing to partner with the Bali government to end the trade and find a positive solution, which may include compensating those who make their living in the trade. You can sign their petition for the governor of Bali here . Via Animals Australia , ABC , and International Business Times Images via Pexels and Pixabay

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Shocking investigation reveals 70,000 dogs in Bali murdered and served to tourists every year

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