Burger King unveils the plant-based Impossible Whopper

April 3, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Burger King unveils the plant-based Impossible Whopper

The Impossible Burger is coming to a Burger King near you. The fast food chain is releasing a new burger with a vegetarian patty called the Impossible Whopper. The company is teaming up with the creators of Impossible Foods to bring a plant-based vegetarian option to nearly 60 Burger Kings in the St. Louis area and potentially to thousands across the country. Burger King hopes the Impossible Whopper will quickly become the new staple for people looking to swap meat for plant-based options. To that end, Burger King is partnering with Impossible Foods to bring the vegetarian patty to a much wider audience than ever before. The vegetarian option will include the same toppings and bun as the regular Whopper and will cost about $1 more. Related: We tried the new Impossible Burger at CES — here’s what we thought Impossible Foods has collaborated with other burger joints in the past. The company featured its Impossible Burger in more than one thousand Carl’s Jr. franchises. It also partnered with White Castle , which sold a slider variety of the food in a little under 400 of its establishments. But the new deal with Burger King is much larger in scale. In fact, the fast food chain plans to release the burger in more than 7,000 restaurants across the United States. That is well over double the amount of venues that currently offer the Impossible Burger. The head of marketing for Burger King, Fernando Machado, said that early tests confirm that people have not been able to tell the difference between the old beef Whopper and the new plant-based one. “People on my team who know the Whopper inside and out, they try it and they struggle to differentiate which one is which,” Machado shared. Burger King is featuring the Impossible Whopper in 59 restaurants in St. Louis to start before expanding to other locations. If things in St. Louis go smoothly, then the company plans to release the Impossible Burger to its other restaurants. Machado believes that the new burger will be a major hit with customers and has every intention in spreading it to other locations. The company hopes that offering the Impossible Burger in multiple venues across the U.S. will encourage people to stop eating beef and opt for a more eco-friendly diet. + Impossible Foods Via NY Times Image via Impossible Foods

More here: 
Burger King unveils the plant-based Impossible Whopper

Panda Express introduces vegan options

March 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Panda Express introduces vegan options

Good news for suburban vegans and those who find themselves trapped in airports or mini-malls: The Chinese fast food chain Panda Express has added its first vegan entrees. Vegan diners at all 2,000 locations can soon safely chow down on Panda Express’ chow mein and eggplant tofu. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals ( PETA ) has long been chipping away at Panda Express’ resistance to offering any dishes sans chicken broth or animal-derived seasoning. Supporters of the animal rights group contacted Panda Express 234,000 times about adding vegan menu entrees. But ultimately it was Vegan Outreach’s 5,000-signature petition that coaxed Panda Express into taking the chicken broth out of the chow mein. In February, the Chinese chain adopted reformulated recipes for its eggplant tofu and chow mein. Other vegan options now include spring rolls, a super green side of kale, cabbage and broccoli and vegan brown and white rice. However, as the restaurants use up old inventory, they might still be serving non-vegan versions through March. Vegans also shouldn’t expect separate cooking surfaces anytime soon. “While seemingly small, this change by Panda Express will make a big impact,” Taylor Radig, campaigns and social media manager of Vegan Outreach , told VegNews . “Not only will the chain expand its customer base to include vegans, but it will also contribute less to animal suffering by using more plant-based ingredients.” Panda Express now joins a growing list of fast-food chains that have added vegan options, including Taco Bell, Panera Bread and Carl’s Jr. Vegan Outreach, founded in 1993, introduced the petition as part of its work to end violence toward animals . According to the nonprofit’s website, “We focus on reaching the people who are motivated enough to make changes now — of which there are always many in our target audience who just need some additional encouragement.” Some of these folks might not be ready to venture into a vegan raw food restaurant, but they may be willing to try Panda Express’ eggplant tofu and chow mein. + Panda Express Via VegNews Images via Rick Obst and Willis Lam

See the original post here:
Panda Express introduces vegan options

Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

February 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

Fast food is one of the most popular conveniences of modern society, but it comes at a huge risk to the environment. Amid growing concerns of agriculture and water risks, a group of global investors are putting pressure on the fast food industry to come up with a sustainable model to lower their footprint on the environment. The investors, who manage a combined $6.5 trillion, issued letters to six of the largest fast food chains in the United States. The letters asked the companies to explain their plan to reduce risks associated with meat and dairy products by the spring of 2019. The companies targeted include McDonald’s, Burger King, Domino’s Pizza, Chipotle Mexican Grills, Yum! Brands (Pizza Hut and KFC) and Wendy’s Co. There are over 80 investors who signed on to the initiative, which is also backed by the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR). The ICCR has a long track record of talking with fast food chains about environmental issues, such as water hazards and deforestation. Related: Prosecco production is destroying soil in some Italian vineyards “Every day around 84 million adults consume fast food in the U.S. alone, but the inconvenient truth of convenience food is that the environmental impacts of the sector’s meat and dairy products have hit unsustainable levels,” said Jeremy Coller, the head of Coller Capital, in a statement. One of the biggest issues with fast food restaurants is their dependency on agriculture, specifically the beef industry . With fast food continuing to rise in popularity, the demand for more beef has reached unsustainable levels. Not to mention, the severe impact the dairy industry has on the environment. To help combat the situation, the new initiative hopes to work with companies to reduce water waste and deforestation, as well as improve conditions in animal agriculture all across the board. Working together, companies in the fast food industry can improve the environment and help cut down on greenhouse gas emissions . It is unclear how the fast food companies have reacted to the letter. If they choose not to act and better the environment, experts predict the agricultural industry — which includes dairy and meat production — will account for around 70 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions within the next 30 years. Via Ceres Image via Shutterstock

Go here to read the rest:
Fast food industry under pressure to decrease its global footprint stat

France is the first country to ban all 5 pesticides linked to bee deaths

February 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on France is the first country to ban all 5 pesticides linked to bee deaths

In a decisive move, France has become the first country to ban all five of the top pesticides blamed for bee die-off around the world. The phenomenon dubbed “colony collapse disorder” has seen bees dying in record numbers, and scientists are pointing fingers as neonicotinoid pesticides as the primary suspect. The EU led the charge by banning three of the pesticides: clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam. However, France took it one step further by also banning thiacloprid and acetamiprid in all farming activities, including greenhouses. Related: Bee hive vandalism in Iowa kills tens of thousands of honeybees The neonicotinoids ( with a similar structure to nicotine ) were introduced in the 1990s and work by attacking the central nervous system of the insects. With the same chemical being dusted on plants that bees target, they also ingest it. Researchers report that neonicotinoids are responsible for a lower sperm count in bees, cutting reproduction rates. Other reports have shown how the chemicals interfere with memory and homing skills, resulting in bees flying away and not returning to the hive. The latest research suggests bees may find the toxic chemicals addictive, keeping them returning for more. The scientific link between pesticides and the declining health of bee populations has many concerned about the future of our food products. Plants, flowers and trees won’t grow without the pollination that bees provide, which means food won’t grow, either. Some farmers are reporting near total losses to their bee populations, which has a dire effect on the workings of the farm. While environmentalists and bee keepers are saluting the decision to ban these pesticides , some farmers are feeling disheartened by their ability to compete in the food production market without chemicals to protect them against invasive bugs and harmful insects. The farmers feel there is not enough evidence to support such a dramatic move. The elimination of these pesticides begs the question of what will replace them and what potential issues could arise from those solutions. In contrast to the landmark move by France, President Trump repealed an Obama-era policy that had banned the use of these pesticides near national wildlife refuges, once again allowing farmers to use them in otherwise protected regions with limited oversight. Via The Telegraph Image via Anna Reiff

View original post here: 
France is the first country to ban all 5 pesticides linked to bee deaths

White Castle is now offering ‘bleeding’ vegan Impossible Burger sliders

April 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on White Castle is now offering ‘bleeding’ vegan Impossible Burger sliders

Iconic fast-food chain White Castle is now offering a vegan version of its signature sliders, with the “beef” provided by Redwood City-based start-up Impossible Foods . It’s the first time that a major chain has offered the meatless burger alternative and marks a shift in what consumers are demanding these days. The Impossible slider re-creates the sensation of eating meat, complete with “blood,” in hopes to bridge the gap between the dry veggie burgers of yore and real meat. While the Impossible Burger is offered at 1,300 different restaurants in the United States, including Fat Burger, Umami Burger, and Momofuko Nishi, its featured debut at White Castle, the largest chain to partner with Impossible Foods, is a landmark for the companies involved. Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown hopes that the White Castle partnership will help the burgeoning vegan “meat” company better understand how to “popularize plant-based meat with mainstream burger lovers.” Founded in 1921 in Wichita, Kansas, White Castle is credited as the first fast-food chain as well as the inventor of the slider. It also has been owned and operated by the Ingram family for four generations. White Castle CEO Lisa Ingram cites the strong relationship that the company has with its customers as a primary reason to explore a vegan burger option.  “It really starts by listening to our customers as we try to do with all of our innovations,” Ingram told Marketplace . “We also have some customers that grew up on White Castle but have decided to be vegetarians… This was a natural evolution for us when we found out that Impossible Foods was creating a plant-based product that looked and tastes like beef both for the people that like meats and for the people that are choosing to have a vegetarian diet.” Related: NYC’s first vegan butcher shop set to open this spring Founded in 2011, Impossible Foods opened its first high-volume production facility in Oakland , California in the fall of 2017. Despite this facility’s taking up a full city-block, the demand for Impossible Foods “meat” has become so high that the company is looking double its production in the near future. The Impossible Burger slider at White Castle costs $1.99, in contrast to the $.77 per beef slider, and is available in select stores in New York, New Jersey and the Chicago area. If this trial run proves to be a success, consumers may soon be able to enjoy the Impossible slider at White Castles across the United States . Via Grub Street and Marketplace Images via Impossible Foods and White Castle

More here:
White Castle is now offering ‘bleeding’ vegan Impossible Burger sliders

This moss can naturally eliminate arsenic from water

April 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This moss can naturally eliminate arsenic from water

Through the magic of moss , anything is possible. Scientists at the University of Stockholm have discovered that  Warnstofia fluitans , or floating hook moss, is capable of extracting arsenic from water. The miracle moss is quick, too – it can make water safe to drink in just an hour. Scientists hope to use the breakthrough to develop wetland areas that can filter out arsenic from mining waste to make water clean for people, agriculture and animals downstream. “Our experiments show that the moss has a very high capacity to remove arsenic,” said research assistant and study co-author Arifin Sandhi . “It takes no more than an hour to remove 80 per cent of the arsenic from a container of water. By then, the water has reached such a low level of arsenic that it is no longer harmful to people.” Native to northern Sweden, floating hook moss offers a green, locally-based solution to a problem plaguing its native habitat. “We hope that the plant-based wetland system that we are developing will solve the arsenic problem in Sweden’s northern mining areas,” said study leader Maria Greger , commenting on the environmental legacy of the Swedish mining industry. Although the use of arsenic compounds in wood products was banned in 2004, the deadly element still infiltrates drinking water through mining, which exposes the water table to natural arsenic found deep within Sweden’s bedrock layer. Related: Gooey cactus guts remove arsenic and bacteria from polluted water Arsenic also poses a threat to agriculture , in which crops absorb arsenic-tainted water through their roots. “How much arsenic we consume ultimately depends on how much of these foods we eat, as well as how and where they were grown,” explained Greger. “Our aim is that the plant-based wetland system we are developing will filter out the arsenic before the water becomes drinking water and irrigation water.” The researchers envision the moss being applied to specific areas through its deliberate cultivation in streams and other bodies of water that pose a high risk of arsenic. Lessons learned in Sweden may then serve other parts of the world that also suffer from arsenic-tainted water. Via Treehugger Images via  Arifin Sandhi and Maria Greger

Read the original:
This moss can naturally eliminate arsenic from water

Impossible Foods cooks up a new paradigm for the food system

May 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Impossible Foods cooks up a new paradigm for the food system

Mission possible: Impossible Foods’ sustainability manager discusses how the startup built a plant-based burger that may revolutionize fast food.

See the original post:
Impossible Foods cooks up a new paradigm for the food system

Arby’s serves up its first CSR report; here’s the beef

September 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Arby’s serves up its first CSR report; here’s the beef

The fast food sandwich chain, under new management since 2013, tells the world what it’s been doing about energy efficiency, hunger relief and programs for employees and youth.

More:
Arby’s serves up its first CSR report; here’s the beef

How Kaiser Permanente uses virtual PPAs to scale solar

September 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How Kaiser Permanente uses virtual PPAs to scale solar

Falling solar costs and new purchasing mechanisms are empowering companies to pursue solar in new ways.

Read more here:
How Kaiser Permanente uses virtual PPAs to scale solar

How McDonald’s aims to serve up deforestation-free packaging

November 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How McDonald’s aims to serve up deforestation-free packaging

You’ve heard about sustainable beef, but the fast food giant is focusing its European supply chain sustainability efforts on packaging.

Here is the original post:
How McDonald’s aims to serve up deforestation-free packaging

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1291 access attempts in the last 7 days.