How companies can source man-made cellulosics more sustainably

January 27, 2020 by  
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As a plant-based fiber, man-made cellulosics have the potential to be a more sustainable choice because they are renewable. But the production process can contribute to deforestation.

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How companies can source man-made cellulosics more sustainably

Trend: Companies warm to nature-based solutions

January 27, 2020 by  
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More than 350 companies have made commitments to help reverse nature loss and restore vital natural systems on which economic activity depends.

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Trend: Companies warm to nature-based solutions

How companies can source polyester more sustainably

January 23, 2020 by  
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The most widely used fiber in the world, polyester accounts for roughly half of the fiber market overall and about 80 percent of all synthetic fibers.

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How companies can source polyester more sustainably

Fashion’s latest trend? Why H&M, other big brands are investing in garment recycling

January 22, 2020 by  
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Less than 1 percent of clothing material today is refashioned to produce new clothing. This is one potential solution.

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Fashion’s latest trend? Why H&M, other big brands are investing in garment recycling

How companies can integrate a more sustainable materials strategy into their business

January 21, 2020 by  
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Almost any textile you can think of, from cotton to leather to nylon, has social and environmental impacts risks at every level of its supply chain. The Material Change Index, reflecting the policies of more than 170 companies, tracks the apparel, footwear and home sector’s progress on managing risk and replacing harmful materials.

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How companies can integrate a more sustainable materials strategy into their business

Patagonias Black Hole Bags are made from recycled plastic bottles

December 2, 2019 by  
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Patagonia is setting the bar for high-quality and sustainable products with its new line of bags made from recycled plastic bottles . Dubbed the Black Hole collection, the newest line offers 25 different bags, each with its own unique features and style. The Black Hole Bags are durable and stylish, and they come in a variety of styles and colors. Even better, the bags help reduce the amount of plastic that ends up in landfills every year. Patagonia’s 2019 line of these bags utilized 10 million plastic bottles, transforming all of this plastic into a unique recycled fabric that forms the webbing and body of the bags. Each bag is water-resistant and backed by the company’s Ironclad Guarantee, which entitles the buyer to a repair, replacement or refund should the product not perform to their full satisfaction. Related: New line of men’s swimwear is made from recycled ocean plastic The vintage-style Black Hole Duffel Bag holds 55 liters and can be either worn as a backpack or carried like a traditional duffel. It is made from 100 percent recycled polyester fabric with a recycled polyester lining and recycled nylon webbing made from 33 plastic water bottles. The 25-liter Black Hole Pack is made from the same tough materials as the duffel and features an air-mesh back panel to increase ventilation and comfort. The main inner pocket includes an internal padded sleeve designed to protect most laptops or hold a hydration reservoir. The accompanying mesh pocket comes with a key holder and an organizer to hold smaller items, such as a cell phone or wallet. The popular brand already prides itself on being environmentally and socially responsible and for good reason. Patagonia pledges at least 1 percent of its sales or 10 percent of pre-tax profits (whichever is higher) to grassroots environmental groups, helping to fund activists devoted to protecting natural habitats, wilderness and biodiversity. Patagonia also employs a Worn Wear program, where customers can mail in their used gear and clothing for store credit. Through this process, the company can find ways to reuse or recycle its products instead of trashing them. Fair, safe labor conditions and environmentally responsible practices are promoted by the company, and specific suppliers can be reviewed on the Patagonia website with full transparency . + Patagonia Images via Patagonia

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Patagonias Black Hole Bags are made from recycled plastic bottles

Fashion collaboration repurposes leather offcuts into eco-friendly home and lifestyle products

October 18, 2019 by  
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Award-winning design studio OPENUU has joined forces with RIL CREED, a sustainable handbag fashion brand, to create two collections for home and lifestyle using upcycled genuine Italian leather . Using scraps of leather that would otherwise be thrown away, these two special collections are combating the wasteful ways of the modern fashion industry and giving new life to forgotten fabrics. The two companies came together for the project after realizing the negative impact that fashion waste has on the environment. They were specifically alarmed by the sobering fact that about 50 percent of natural leather hide is wasted (often destined for landfill) and up to 95 percent of the textiles that end up in landfills each year could have been recycled. Related: Fashion brands ranked for toxic textiles and sustainability Through their experiences in the design world, OPENUU and RIL CREED have found ways to turn otherwise wasted pieces of durable materials into beautiful, upcycled pieces that can be used in everyday life. The products are unique, sustainable and limited-edition. The first collection celebrates the combination of understated luxury and practical durability. Dubbed “Amber Home,” the decorative cushions are made from 100 percent upcycled leather and fabric offcuts from factories. The design and production of this collection of home goods benefited from OPENUU’s interior decor expertise as well as RIL CREED’s proficiency in leather handbag production. For the second collection, “Willow Travel,” OPENUU and RIL CREED took inspiration from watching the sunsets in different cities during their summer travels. The series of travel accessories was produced using the same initiatives of responsible leather and fabric upcycling. In an effort to challenge the monotone look of traditional travel wallets, these passport holders and ID holders come in bright, playful colors that will appeal to a wide range of travelers. + OPENUU + RIL CREED Images via OPENUU and RIL CREED

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Fashion collaboration repurposes leather offcuts into eco-friendly home and lifestyle products

G7 summit: Fashion companies make a pact to protect the planet

August 26, 2019 by  
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Known as The Fashion Pact, a group of 32 major luxury brands, labels and companies, such as Adidas, Burberry, Kering, Hermes, Nike, Prada and Puma, shared its ideas to improve sustainability in the fashion industry at the G7 summit from August 24 to 26. While addressing French President Emmanuel Macron on Friday, some of the pact’s members said they would focus on using other options in their work in order to protect forests and minimize plastic usage. Related: Zara pledges 100% sustainable fabrics by 2025 At the summit, Burberry CEO Marco Gobbetti said, “We know that one company cannot solve the environmental challenges facing our planet alone, and we believe in the power of collaboration to drive real change.” Some of the pact’s ideas include pledging to 100 percent renewable energy for operations by 2030; removing microfiber pollution; boosting biodiversity and creating eco-friendly agricultural, mining and forestry processes; and cutting back on single-use plastics in packaging by 2030. The fashion industry initiative came to fruition in early 2019, when Macron asked François-Henri Pinault, the CEO of Kering Group, which owns Gucci, Saint Laurent and Alexander McQueen, to form a coalition that discusses how the industry’s current practices impact the environment . Pinault talked about his ideas for the coalition at the Copenhagen fashion summit in May, according to The Guardian . “This has nothing to do with competition,” he told delegates at the time. “It’s a matter of leadership. Alone it is useless, you have to work with your peers. We might not succeed, but we will achieve more than not doing anything.” Several key fashion companies have been criticized for not addressing recent wildfires in the Amazon rainforest , despite donating millions of euros toward the restoration of the Notre Dame. Macron described the situation in the Amazon as an international crisis on Friday and said he wanted it to be addressed as a key issue at the 45th G7 summit. Via The Guardian and Reuters Image via Tokatlian

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G7 summit: Fashion companies make a pact to protect the planet

Maven Moment: Slow Fashion

August 7, 2019 by  
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I was trying on some of my summer clothes last … The post Maven Moment: Slow Fashion appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Fashion brands ranked for toxic textiles and sustainability

July 25, 2019 by  
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A leading green economy nonprofit, Green America, released a report ranking top fashion companies based on their sustainability and transparency. The results reveal the inadequacies of greening the fashion industry.  Their study investigated 14 major corporations, each with household-name brands. The report scored companies based on transparency, sustainability, working conditions, chemical use, waste and water management. Their findings concluded that none of the top 14 corporations, nor their distinct brands, can be considered industry leaders in terms of ethics or the environment . However, the companies that ranked higher than average include Target, Jan Sport, Nike, Gap, Old Navy, Banana Republic and The North Face. Companies that scored below average include Ann Taylor, American Eagle, Ralph Lauren, Abercrombie and Fitch, Walmart, Anthropologie, Urban Outfitters and Free People. Related: Zara pledges 100% sustainable fabrics by 2025 The worst companies, which failed metrics on Green America’s score card, include J. Crew, OshKosh B’gosh and Forever 21. “Consumers want sustainable clothing, and the market is responding. But too often, many of the promises we hear from conventional companies are token sustainability initiatives that are band-aids to one small part of the problem, or empty platitudes without a plan to achieve real change. Sustainability shouldn’t just be a marketing trend,” said Green America’s social justice campaigns manager, Caroline Chen.  The report also called out corporations’ practice of promoting “token brands,” or one eco-textile line that they can use for public relations knowing that consumers will associate their name with sustainability without looking further into the rest of their lines. Similarly, many corporations make sweeping sustainability pledges without specifying metrics nor timelines and hardly follow through with implementation. Overall, the textile industry uses 43 million tons of toxic chemicals every year, and most companies do not disclose the source of their chemicals so it is difficult to understand the health impacts. Green America’s report suggests that those who are concerned about chemicals in clothing should shop at thrift stores and wear clothing until it wears out– this not only helps reduce the amount of new clothing produced, it also reduces how many chemicals you are personally exposed to. + Green America Images via Pixabay

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Fashion brands ranked for toxic textiles and sustainability

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