‘I Am a Plastic Bag’ is made from recycled single-use plastic bottles

March 2, 2020 by  
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Following the sold-out success of “I Am Not a Plastic Bag” in 2007, designer brand Anya Hindmarch has launched a new product, called “I Am a Plastic Bag”, aimed at recycling single-use plastic and leaving behind a net-zero carbon footprint from production. The initial “I Am Not a Plastic Bag” release was a campaign to raise awareness about disposable plastic bag usage. According to a press release from the company, “The British Retail Consortium estimated that in 2006, the U.K. alone used 10.6bn plastic bags, and this figure dropped to 6.1bn in 2010. Specifically, Sainsbury’s cut the number of bags they gave away by 58% in the two years that followed the campaign, giving out 312m fewer bags in 2008 than 2009 and saving 13,200 tonnes of virgin plastic over two years.” Related: Patagonia’s Black Hole Bags are made from recycled plastic bottles Thirteen years later, Hindmarch has decided to shift focus. Instead of centering the campaign around reducing plastic bag usage, the new “I Am a Plastic Bag” is made from a soft, cotton-like fabric constructed from recycled plastic bottles to spotlight the excessive waste generated from single-use plastic. The manufacturing process begins by washing and sorting the collected bottles before they are shredded and turned into pellets. The pellets are then converted into fibers that are spun and woven into fabric . To achieve the weather-resistant finish, the bags are coated in a recycled PVB made from old windshields. Anya Hindmarch partnered with a Taiwanese company for the finish, which appears to be the only one of its kind that has achieved Global Recycled Standard (GRS) certification. After considering faux options, the company decided the least impactful trim was real leather. It sourced the natural meat byproduct as a way to recycle the material. Collected from a tannery in Northern Italy, the leather doesn’t travel far to the manufacturing line. While Anya Hindmarch designers don’t believe that carbon-offsetting is the answer for an industry known for excessive waste and pollution , they also partnered with EcoAct, a global climate change consultant. EcoAct has been measuring the emissions from the I Am a Plastic Bag production in order to make the process carbon-neutral. As a statement of what the line stands for, Anya Hindmarch closed its doors for three days, completely filling the store with 90,000 discarded plastic water bottles and a post on the door explaining the cause. A limited selection of bags was pre-launched in February at London Fashion Week, and the complete four-color collection will be widely available in April. + Anya Hindmarch Images via Anya Hindmarch

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‘I Am a Plastic Bag’ is made from recycled single-use plastic bottles

Can forensics tech solve the mystery of supply chain traceability?

February 27, 2020 by  
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A pilot coordinated by Fashion for Good and supported by C&A, Kering, PVH and Zalando provides clues for the future of sustainable fashion.

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Can forensics tech solve the mystery of supply chain traceability?

Futuristic air-purifying masks combat air pollution with innovative fan system

February 26, 2020 by  
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In a world where air pollution causes an estimated 7 million deaths annually , the fashion and health worlds are colliding to bring us products that not only make us look good, but also keep us safe. A? Air has recently unveiled its Atm?s face mask — a high-tech, futuristic mask that wraps comfortably around the face while purifying the air you breathe. Recently unveiled at CES 2020 in Las Vegas, the Atm?s face mask has been proven to provide up to 50 times better air quality than the top anti-pollution masks on the market. In fact, although most air pollution masks can help reduce the amount of particulate matter that enters your airways, they typically don’t seal properly around the mouth and nose areas, which greatly reduces their effectiveness. Related: This 3D-printed device could help its users breathe underwater The Atm?s mask was designed with a special proprietary design technology called PositivAir that eliminated the need for an uncomfortable seal. Instead, multiple tiny fans within the device, which wraps comfortably around the lower half of the face, guide pure, filtered air directly into the nose and mouth. This system provides as much as 240 liters of clean air per minute. The state-of-the-art system channels the air you exhale directly out of the mask, which avoids fogging up the front window. Additionally, Atm?s has embedded Bluetooth technology that constantly tracks your respiratory activity in order to adapt the mask’s performance to ensure optimal air filtration under any circumstances. According to the company, although Atm?s, which retails for $350, has already been used as a futuristic accessory on more than a few fashion runways, the face mask is an innovative device specifically designed for medical professionals, first responders and firefighters. With the current outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus, people around the world are investing in masks to reduce their exposure not only to air pollutants but also airborne pathogens that threaten health . The demand for masks will likely become greater overtime, making this design more important than ever. + A? Air Images via A? Air

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Futuristic air-purifying masks combat air pollution with innovative fan system

Nike reveals Space Hippie sustainable sneakers made from waste

February 25, 2020 by  
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Nike has launched a new, exploratory collection, aptly named Space Hippie , to highlight the NASA-inspired concept of in-situ resource utilization — the idea of using space-based resources during deep space exploration. By taking the company’s own “space junk” from the floors of its manufacturing warehouses, Nike is turning waste into feedstock, creating a sustainable sneaker that combines high performance with low impact. The Space Hippie shoes are assembled using recycled “space junk”, such as recycled plastic water bottles, T-shirts and yarn scraps. The “Crater Foam” tooling is made up of a combination of Nike Grind rubber and recycled foam materials. According to Nike, every aspect of the Space Hippie line was chosen with sustainability in mind, from the material to the production methods to the packaging. The new shoes boast the lowest carbon footprint score compared to the company’s other products. Related: Fashion companies make a pact to protect the planet The collection includes four different shoe designs, appropriately named Space Hippie 01, 02, 03 and 04, and the styles are nothing short of unique. The sustainable sneakers feature gray bodies with complementary orange elements, including the iconic Nike Swoosh. Nike doesn’t seem to be shying away from the fact that these shoes are essentially made from trash , yet the design is still quite compelling, fashion-forward and (unsurprisingly) futuristic. Nike recently unveiled the collection, which will be released in Spring 2020 to Nike members at Nike House of Innovation flagship locations and select retailers around the country. Nike, as a business , has a lot to gain from recycled footwear. “We must think about the entire process: how we design it, how we make it, how we use it, how we reuse it and how we cut out waste at every step,” said Seana Hannah, vice president of sustainable innovation at Nike. “These are the fundamentals of a circular mindset that inform best practices.” + Nike Via Dezeen and Core77 Images via Nike

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Nike reveals Space Hippie sustainable sneakers made from waste

The North Face aims to increase its circularity

February 5, 2020 by  
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The outdoor recreation product company is expanding its Renewed recommerce program.

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The North Face aims to increase its circularity

How companies can embrace circularity in their material sourcing strategies

February 3, 2020 by  
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Incorporating recycled materials into product collections is a good start.

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How companies can embrace circularity in their material sourcing strategies

How companies can align their materials strategy to the SDGs

January 31, 2020 by  
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The textile industry has a powerful opportunity to shift the needle in both producer and consumer contexts.

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How companies can align their materials strategy to the SDGs

5 actions companies can take to fix the ubiquitous polybag

January 31, 2020 by  
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If you’ve ever ordered garments online from a retailer, you would have, in all likelihood, had it delivered, neatly sealed within a polybag.

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5 actions companies can take to fix the ubiquitous polybag

Will technology be the game-changer for rising transparency in the fashion supply chain?

January 31, 2020 by  
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Sponsored: Discussions on the benefit of blockchain in fashion supply chains have risen in recent years. Is blockchain technology the solution to opaqueness in the fashion industry?

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Will technology be the game-changer for rising transparency in the fashion supply chain?

How companies can source leather more sustainably

January 30, 2020 by  
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The environmental impact of using this material mirrors that of using cattle as a protein source.

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How companies can source leather more sustainably

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