5 Sustainable Fashion Lines for Women

March 10, 2021 by  
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Fashion carries a heavy environmental price, but it does not … The post 5 Sustainable Fashion Lines for Women appeared first on Earth 911.

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5 Sustainable Fashion Lines for Women

Maven Moment: Salvaging Stained Clothing

March 10, 2021 by  
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Many years ago, my mother-in-law Lucy told me a story … The post Maven Moment: Salvaging Stained Clothing appeared first on Earth 911.

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Maven Moment: Salvaging Stained Clothing

Allbirds creates a plant-based leather

March 8, 2021 by  
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Allbirds put its best foot forward when it stepped into the sustainable footwear sphere. Now, the company is going further with the development of a new, plant-based leather . Made with rubber, vegetable oil and other natural ingredients, this leather alternative, aptly named Plant Leather, has 40 times less carbon impact than animal-derived leather and 17 times less carbon impact than synthetic leathers made from plastics. The leather industry is a huge polluter. Many chemicals are used to process leather, and tanneries generate a lot of waste . The runoff from leather production negatively impacts air and water quality. It also means killing animals in order to use their hides. While this used to be done in a more sustainable, nose-to-tail manner for thousands of years, today, the process of making leather is not environmentally friendly. Related: We wore Allbirds’ Tree Runners around the world — here’s how they performed Allbirds hopes to offer the durability and attractive appearance of leather without the harmful side effects that come with producing animal-derived leather goods. Plant Leather is a new material made possible by Mirum technology from Natural Fiber Welding. For those who have been waiting for a petroleum-free alternative to leather, this is a true miracle product. It features no petroleum, polyurethane or synthetic binders. “Our partnership with NFW and planned introduction of Plant Leather based on their technology is an exciting step on our journey to eradicate petroleum from the fashion industry,” said Joey Zwillinger, co-founder and co-CEO of Allbirds. Allbirds is a Climate Neutral Certified B Corporation that is focused on combating the use of petroleum-based materials in fashion . The company has already created a eucalyptus-based fiber and EVA foam made with sugarcane, both of which are open-source formulas available for any other company to use, too. Plant Leather has a small carbon footprint and is fully biodegradable . The leather is naturally pigmented as well. Allbirds plans to use Plant Leather for new shoes that it will be launching at the end of 2021. + Allbirds Images via Allbirds

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Allbirds creates a plant-based leather

How 12 Emerging Leaders are embarking on sustainability career journeys

March 8, 2021 by  
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How 12 Emerging Leaders are embarking on sustainability career journeys Deonna Anderson Mon, 03/08/2021 – 01:40 In early February, more than 1,200 sustainability professionals gathered online for GreenBiz 21. And each day after the mainstage talks and panels, a few of my GreenBiz Group colleagues and I hopped onto Zoom to convene with 12 students and young professionals poised to become sustainability leaders of the future . From marketing to engineering, the GreenBiz 21 Emerging Leaders represent a variety of professions in the sustainability field. The program aims to elevate, cultivate and support the next generation of Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) leaders in sustainable business. During the three-day event, they hopped into roundtable discussions, offered insights in the event chat and learned about the ever-changing sustainability field. “GreenBiz 21 reaffirmed that there are multiple paths when navigating a career in sustainable business,” said Anna Koskol, an Emerging Leader who serves as an environmental educator at Hudson River Park Trust in New York City. “It was reassuring to see people like me, from various backgrounds, working so passionately for a more sustainable world.” To learn more about the Emerging Leaders’ experience at GreenBiz 21, we asked them the following: At this point, how has attending GreenBiz 21 helped you learn about the sustainable business career path, from navigating to overcoming the barriers that exist for you and your peers? Was there anything particularly impactful that happened during your time at GreenBiz 21? What made you hopeful or inspired during GreenBiz 21? Below are the responses from 11 of the 12 Emerging Leaders, lightly edited for clarity and length, and presented in alphabetical order by last name. Kristina Chu  Senior Environmental Analyst, Gradient  GreenBiz 21 brought together so many different organizations and individuals sustainably transforming business, allowing me to see that everyone has a unique career path. I very much left feeling like I have the power to ensure my future career aligns with my values for sustainability and justice. Furthermore, I learned that I am not alone in my mission to create a greener, more equitable world. Attending conferences like GreenBiz 21 serve as perfect soil and ground to grow meaningful connections and partnerships! I was deeply moved by the keynote session ” Why Advancing Equity is Everyone’s Job ” with Jarami Bond, Michele Moore and Kimberly Lewis. [ Editor’s note: Jarami Bond is the chief storyteller at Bond Studio, a visual storytelling company, and senior advisor for the recently launched nonprofit GreenBiz.org . Michele Moore is the CEO of nonprofit Groundswell. And Kimberly Lewis is the CEO of Havenz Network. ] It was beautiful and empowering to see female leaders center friendship and solidarity in the movement towards equity. One phrase that has stuck with me in the past few weeks following the conference is: It is about the process, not the end goal.  I am inspired by my fellow Emerging Leaders. Our calls at the end of each conference day showed me that we stand in solidarity, and the future is bright. We hold such beautiful, collective power to think critically, show up with empathy and build towards liberation and justice. I am grateful and honored to be a part of this new community. Natalie Gray Systems Specialist, Omnidian GreenBiz 21 was a whirlwind event. For me, it reinforced the notion that all of us — whether sustainability specialists, Indigenous advocates, city employees, Emerging Leaders — are individuals using our circles of influence to affect the changes we believe will benefit life on Earth for generations to come. I’m happy to see these circles of influence increasing for many deserving thought leaders as a result of GreenBiz conferences and networks.  When I worked in the Mayor’s Office of Policy and Innovation at the city of Seattle, I would often hear the phrase, “Nothing about them without them,” meaning not to work on a project without engaging the people it would impact directly. Too often, we explain our work in environmental sustainability “for the sake of our young people” or “for the next generation” or say “we have to get everyone on board to make it work” but then fail to engage with the young people and the “everyone” we claim we are working for.  Giving those most impacted the resources they need to do the work — people with the drive, the flexibility, the imagination to innovate — not only invests in the longevity of your company and life on Earth but reminds us that young people are not just the leaders of tomorrow, as we often say they are, but the leaders of today, too. Anna Koskol  Environmental Educator, Hudson River Park Trust GreenBiz 21 reaffirmed that there are multiple paths when navigating a career in sustainable business. Listening to the stories of GreenBiz 21’s speakers and my peers in the Emerging Leaders cohort, I learned about the interests, obstacles and motivations that led each of us to this point in our careers. It was reassuring to see people like me, from various backgrounds, working so passionately for a more sustainable world. GreenBiz 21 allowed me to experience firsthand the power of diverse representation in the sustainability field. I believe wholeheartedly that a key to preparing tomorrow’s leaders for a greener future, especially BIPOC youth, is to expose us to the fullest spectrum of [science, technology, engineering and math] careers and leaders. I look forward to sharing these stories and career opportunities with the youth interns that I mentor at Hudson River Park to help embolden them to be their wildest dreams. I was particularly interested in the discussions around plastic packaging and waste throughout the event. Plastic pollution is a problem greatly impacting the health of NYC waterways. Hudson River Park has therefore prioritized efforts to reduce plastic pollution through a program called Park Over Plastic that educates and empowers our park community to combat plastic pollution together. While leading Park Over Plastic, we have faced innovation gaps or times when there isn’t a viable replacement for some single-use plastics. At GreenBiz 21, I was encouraged by speakers discussing ideas for creating a circular economy and prioritizing a systems approach as a financially, environmentally and socially smart business model. Overall, I was most inspired by the organizers and members of the 2021 Emerging Leaders cohort. I am grateful to have met such passionate, supportive people, and I feel all the more prepared to be a change-maker in my community. Together we can do more! Jessica Levine Strategic Engagement Coordinator, The Recycling Partnership At GreenBiz 21, I learned that businesses are starting to focus more on people — both employees and the communities they serve. When considering strategic objectives, I learned that businesses are focusing on how they can be proactive rather than reactive. Businesses are either beginning to or refining their processes around investing their best resources to positively influence not just the economic impacts but social impacts of their business. Businesses are propelled to consider how their business objectives and performance impact not just their target audiences but all people.   In addition, businesses are recognizing that supporting their people (staff) can result in a diversity of thought that is much needed and desired innovation in all levels of business. My takeaway from this is that my perspective and voice matters, and it’s important that I speak up and out when inspired to because I can make a difference.  During the conference, I was also inspired by the fact that I was not the only young professional passionate about understanding the intersection of [diversity, equity and inclusion] and sustainability and taking action toward equitable systems change. I felt inspired and empowered to catalyze systems change in my sphere, knowing that I have the support of a community made up of passionate movers and shakers, trailblazers, allies, activists, advocates and community members. These industry stakeholders want to make change happen for good. I am grateful for the opportunity to be a part of the GreenBiz 21 cohort of Emerging Leaders and look forward to pursuing continued growth and learning through the opportunity. Danii Mcletchie  Environmental Systems Engineer, Campbell’s Soup The speed networking sessions allowed me to meet so many different people who were tackling sustainability from their own angle. I was able to get great advice from people who have made strides in the career path that I’m currently in, and I know some of those connections will last for a lifetime. As I’m at the beginning of my sustainability journey, the best piece of advice I was given was to look for ways to make any job I do sustainable, rather than just looking for a job with “sustainability” in the title. These small words have completely changed my outlook on how I was approaching things and reminded me not to get caught up in buzzwords.  It was very inspiring to know that from emerging innovators to large corporations to young entrepreneurs, there were people from different walks of life, continuously working to create a positive sustainable impact so that humanity has a chance of surviving in a better way. Emerging Leaders meet with GreenBiz staff during GreenBiz 21 conference. Are you a student or early-career professional who is interested in the circular economy? Applications for the Circularity 21 Emerging Leaders program are open until May 17. Apply here . Camille Minns  Assistant for Climate & Energy, Ceres The sustainability and climate space has always been of interest to me, and I have no doubt that this is where I want to develop my career. This is a broad and dynamic field with numerous opportunities and approaches, and I’m proud to work in this area. I’m a staunch intersectional environmentalist , and I believe that companies should work to become the same. If they are to be considered sustainable, businesses must ask themselves, “What are we sustaining?” If it is not healthy communities and the planet, but instead the same systems and behaviors that have placed us in this precarious situation in the first place, then we’re on the wrong track. There may not be many people who identify as I do in this space, but that’s changing and therefore, I won’t stop learning, lending my voice and doing my part. I believe this [is] also the feeling of the cohort of authentic, brilliant Emerging Leaders I was fortunate to be a part of. This cohort is a microcosm of the young people out there asking the critical questions, innovating and disrupting spaces, and speaking up. The discussions we had, the passion and ideas are all inspiration and fuel to keep me going. I thoroughly enjoyed the conversations on climate action and social justice, regenerative agriculture and the need to rethink plastics. The launch of GreenBiz.org , however, was one of the more impactful parts of this conference. I love any opportunity to see more BIPOC in the environmental and sustainability field, and spaces like this play a tremendous role in making that happen. Aayushi Mishra Scientist, EA Engineering There were quite a few impactful events that took place during the three-day conference. I met with dozens of interesting people, ranging from students to company CEOs. Regardless of the seniority of the individual, each individual had intelligent, articulate and thought-provoking questions and ideas. We kept extending our sessions to continue discussing ways to make systemic changes, and at the end of each conversation, one thing was clear — while the sustainability/ESG/CSR sector is booming, the people making up this subset are unique. We want to question every process that we have normalized and understand ways to make it more sustainable. Up until now, this was something I’d assumed would happen one day in the near future. Attending this conference proved that the “near future” is now. I feel hopeful about businesses embracing the concept of a circular economy. This was one of the key areas discussed throughout GreenBiz 21 — it was particularly interesting to see how many unique ideas people had during breakout sessions and in the one-on-one networking times. It was repeatedly emphasized that while recycling is an excellent way to combat waste management, simply stopping there isn’t enough — purchasing durable items and reusing them is a more sustainable way of living. One of the sessions I attended, Sewing Circular: Strategies in the Fashion Industry, discussed how people can transition away from “fast fashion” towards more resilient pieces of clothing that would last several times longer. GreenBiz 21 made me hopeful about our global society adapting and shifting from a linear to a more circular economy. Michaela Ritz Production Assistant, Gotham Greens Attending GreenBiz 21 as an Emerging Leader made clear to me that I would love to start my sustainability career doing on-the-ground fieldwork at a grassroots level, implementing the tenants of sustainability with members of a place-based community. In hearing from small groups and big companies, the common strand was the need to build relationships, foster respect and meet people where they are to value the knowledge they carry inside them. My impression is that starting at the foundation and building upon what is established is the best way to build trust and promote broader cooperation in our sustainability goals.  My fellow Emerging Leaders all share that desire, and it was encouraging to know I now have 11 other passionate and thought-provoking young professionals to call on; they have the drive and curiosity to build professional networks and living spaces we want to see exist in an ideal world. Listening to my peers revealed that barriers are only as limiting as we give them the power to be, because if I ever feel alone in an experience or setting, I know they have probably lived a similar experience and overcame it. We all are aware that learning from each other and honoring our differences is a great asset to be leveraged in solving challenges that seem overwhelming. GreenBiz 21 for me raised more questions than it offered answers, but that is the beauty of being invited into a forum where you can grow. Hearing Indigenous perspectives was a memorable and critical part of GreenBiz 21 for me. Beyond diversity and inclusion discussions, it was eye-opening to be confronted with how even our best intentions in achieving sustainability can be limited due to warped understandings and socially ingrained narratives. Colonialism, commercialization and co-option are still present in today’s sustainability structures, and I found it refreshingly honest to hear that brought to the fore. So many individuals, in grassroots orgs and major corporations alike, are well-intended to do good in the world but this can’t exist without introspection and paradigm shifts. Listening to Tara Houska, Sherri Mitchell and Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin afforded the opportunity to hear from those who have a historical legacy in this work, and GreenBiz 21 made those connections possible. [ Editor’s note: Tara Houska (Couchiching First Nation) is the founder of Giniw Collective, an Indigenous women, 2-spirit led grassroots, frontline effort to protect the planet. Sherri Mitchell is the founding director of the Land Peace Foundation, an organization dedicated to the global protection of Indigenous land and water rights and the preservation of the Indigenous way of life. And Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin is president of the Regenerative Agriculture Alliance, which has the mission to scale up regenerative agriculture supply chains. ] During the rapid networking sessions, I interacted with so many people from different parts of the world who were joining the conference at different times of the day, from home, work, in between commitments, and while supervising children. In this difficult time for society and our planet, I am reminded that there are plenty of dedicated, hopeful and talented people who are committing themselves to making sustainability a reality every day, even in the face of big setbacks and limited time. There is always a brighter horizon and something to look forward to.  Juliae Riva Student at University of Oregon, Planning, Public Policy & Management & General Social Sciences The GreenBiz 21 conference was a much-needed uplifting, motivating and inspirational three days. I loved having the opportunity to meet people from around the world, who are also passionate about finding solutions to climate change. Through speaking with my fellow Emerging Leaders, I learned that the sustainable business world is filled with the constant pursuit for new knowledge and information to guide our actions. From learning about plastic in oceans to tree equity and racial justice, my passion for sustainability deepened, and I was in awe of peoples’ pursuits. Being in a community where everyone has one common goal and passion was incredibly inspiring to me, especially given that everyone is taking different routes to tackle various problems. I am so appreciative that I was able to listen and learn, and have my eyes opened to the greater sustainability community. Everyone I met was kindhearted, welcoming and supportive — and it left a profound impact on me that I will carry with me as I graduate from college and start my sustainability career. Sydney Thomas Corporate Citizenship & Sustainability Reporting Fellow, DTE Energy I found the entirety of the GreenBiz 21 conference to be impactful, despite the challenges of a virtual environment it fostered connection and learning in a way I haven’t experienced this year. In particular, the networking platform, providing the opportunity to hear career advice and connect with leaders in sustainability, was wonderful. Most importantly, meeting the fellow Emerging Leaders was a rare opportunity to connect with other young professionals across the country during COVID-19. Additionally, I found the sessions on circular economy influential on my current work, reminding me to look at the entire value chain of operations. Considering how to reduce Scope 3 emissions, helping suppliers go on your sustainability journey, and how to reduce the impact of the life cycle of your products, while encouraging your consumers to uptake sustainable behavior change as well. Each and every keynote speech during the conference left me feeling inspired. The keynotes echoed the overwhelming demand from communities, consumers and even investors for sustainable, equitable change. There was a tremendous call to action, not just inspiring messages from all the keynotes, and most moving [call to action was] from Sherri Mitchell, Tara Houska and Dr. Katharine Wilkinson from the All We Can Save Project . [ Editor’s note: Katharine Wilkinson is co-founder and co-director of the All We Can Save Project .] I also felt hopeful by the repeated acknowledgment of privilege, not just by individuals, but corporations, including Microsoft. Learning about their ambitious emissions targets, not only to be net-zero but carbon negative by 2030, removing the carbon emissions they have generated since their start in 1970. As told by Vanessa Miler-Fels, [director for energy innovation and impact at] Microsoft, “Those who can afford to move faster, and go further, should do so.” I’m hopeful that other corporations will recognize their privilege and ability to set and accomplish increasingly ambitious targets. Coco Wang Digital Marketing Specialist at Changing Habits Solutions Attending GreenBiz 21 provided me an industry insider view into sustainability. Though business leaders often express the increasing demand for future leaders in sustainability, there exist many barriers for ambitious and passionate young professionals like my peers and I [when it comes to] understanding how we can best make a positive impact. Through roundtables and panel discussions, I learned the specific struggles in sustainable business; whether it is the climate knowledge gap or making sense of various reporting standards. Identifying these current issues allowed me to better understand my role in accelerating our path to sustainability. Additionally, my experience at GreenBiz 21 reaffirmed my passion for corporate governance, strategy, equity and youth leadership. Another take-away from GreenBiz 21 for me is a strong feeling of hope and inspiration. From my day-to-day work and social media feed, I can’t help but get frustrated and disappointed by how much our world is not doing what is necessary to save the planet. But that has changed after connecting with my peers and young leaders who share these frustrations and aspirations for a better world. There is a whole lot that young leaders can mutually learn, share and support in this emerging community, and I am inspired to lead our community to enact this potential. Putting Black and Indigenous people as well as youth in the forefront of this conference has also demonstrated the industry’s openness to learn and unlearn. Environmental issues are complex and sustainability is no-doubt difficult to navigate. But I am confident that, with our generation, our world is capable and prepared to tackle these issues head-on. Topics Careers GreenBiz 21 Emerging Leaders Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Photo by  fizkes  on Shutterstock.

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How 12 Emerging Leaders are embarking on sustainability career journeys

Adidas Outdoor line furthers brand’s push for sustainability

January 14, 2021 by  
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While many big businesses and brands cause overwhelming environmental problems, Adidas works to clean up its act. In a bold move last January, Adidas acknowledged its contribution to plastic waste, noting the waste’s negative impacts on the world’s oceans. The brand followed up this acknowledgment with plans to move forward with the environment in mind. Adidas’s new Outdoor line stays true to this environmental commitment with clear sustainable features. The Outdoor line includes shirts, pants, jackets, shoes and, of course, face masks. You can wear head to toe Adidas while still dressing sustainably. Adidas accomplishes this by using recycled materials and PRIMEGREEN technology. The company describes PRIMEGREEN as a “performance fabric” containing absolutely no virgin plastic. This fabric looks and feels good, all while helping Adidas work toward its goal to end plastic waste. But if the fabric contains no virgin plastic, what exactly is it made of? Hitting on the third R in the “reduce, reuse, recycle” trifecta, PRIMEGREEN contains 100% recycled polyester. Related: Adidas unveils lightweight hiking shoe made from ocean plastic Several products in the Outdoor line use these sustainable materials, but one that stands out is the MyShelter Parley RAIN.RDY Jacket. Using 100% recycled polyester and Parley Ocean Plastic made from recycled marine plastic waste, the MyShelter Parley RAIN.RDY Jacket exemplifies Adidas’s efforts to reduce plastic waste. You can grab this eco-friendly jacket along with vests, parkas and insulated hooded jackets in both men’s and women’s styles on Adidas’s  website . This line serves as just part of Adidas’s sustainability work. While the use of recycled polyester demonstrates Adidas’s work toward its commitment to shift to recycled polyester in all products by 2024, the brand has additional environmental goals in sight. As stated in an  article  from January 2020, Adidas plans to reduce its carbon footprint by 30% by 2030 and be climate neutral by 2050. An influential brand like Adidas making such strong strides toward sustainability encourages competitors to adopt green initiatives, too. Hopefully, this green trend can make a real impact on the world’s plastic waste problem. + Adidas Images via Adidas

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Adidas Outdoor line furthers brand’s push for sustainability

How To Quit Fast Fashion for Good

January 7, 2021 by  
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The MO of “fast fashion” brands is to mass-produce trendy … The post How To Quit Fast Fashion for Good appeared first on Earth 911.

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How To Quit Fast Fashion for Good

New benchmark shows that biodiversity is in fashion

December 3, 2020 by  
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New benchmark shows that biodiversity is in fashion Liesl Truscott Thu, 12/03/2020 – 01:00 This week, in advance of World Soil Day — Dec. 5 — the Textile Exchange Corporate Fiber and Materials Benchmark (CFMB) Program is launching a new tool to help the fashion and textile industry take urgent action on biodiversity. The Biodiversity Benchmark , developed in partnership with The Biodiversity Consultancy and Conservation International and supported by Sappi, will enable companies to understand their impacts and dependencies on nature in their materials sourcing strategies, chart a pathway to delivering positive biodiversity outcomes, and benchmark their progress. Outcomes and learnings can be channeled back into the community to support further improvements. The benchmark is in beta and comments will be open through Jan. 31. All interested companies are eligible, and it is free to participate. More than 200 companies already report through the CFMB. With the Biodiversity Benchmark, the aim is to integrate biodiversity into existing materials and sourcing strategies, rather than approach biodiversity as a new or disconnected topic. The aim is to integrate biodiversity into existing materials and sourcing strategies, rather than approach biodiversity as a new or disconnected topic. The inclusion of biodiversity is part of Textile Exchange’s Climate+ strategy, which focuses on urgent climate action and recognizes that soil health, water and biodiversity will play a key role in this transition. Benchmarking drives a race to the top and is one way Textile Exchange mobilizes the industry to accelerate the uptake of preferred materials. It is my hope that this new benchmark will help transform biodiversity commitments into actions. A risk — and an opportunity The Earth’s interrelated systems of water, land, biodiversity and ocean are facing unsustainable pressure. We cannot win the fight against climate change without addressing nature loss.? — Science Based Targets Network, 2020 When surveyed in 2019, 42 percent of our member companies put “biodiversity risk” as important or very important to them. A sustainability strategy is no longer an option, it is now table stakes. Considering biodiversity as part of the strategy is the next step, not only because biodiversity is an urgent issue and the right thing to do, but also because it poses real business risks, particularly as many businesses are directly dependent on biodiversity and nature’s contributions to human systems and well-being. A company that recognizes biodiversity risk as a priority would acknowledge the importance of nature’s services to its business as well as how its operations affect biodiversity. The fashion industry, for example, is very dependent on natural resources and healthy agricultural and forestry ecosystems. The Biodiversity Consultancy’s chief executive, Helen Temple, sees this as an opportunity: “The fashion and textile industry now has an opportunity to establish a leadership position in how it tackles biodiversity and nature loss.” No-regrets approach This Biodiversity Benchmark Companion Guide is designed to catalyze companies to think about their fiber and material choices in relation to their dependencies, risks, opportunities and impacts through a biodiversity lens. While a company’s biodiversity strategy is being fully developed and science-based targets confirmed, we advocate a no-regrets approach , as defined by the UNDP, UNEP and IUCN and expressed by the Science Based Targets Network. Such an approach focuses on maximizing positive and minimizing negative aspects of nature-based adaptation strategies and options. No-regret actions include measures taken which do not worsen vulnerabilities (for instance to climate change) or which increase adaptive capacities and measures that always will have a positive impact on livelihoods and ecosystems (regardless how the climate changes). It’s there to encourage companies to start immediately by taking positive action. From my own industry — apparel and textiles — I want to share three examples of companies taking action on biodiversity: Suppliers leading the way: Sappi Biodiversity is never more relevant than with suppliers, who are arguably the closest to the issue, working directly on the land and in ecosystems, sourcing, refining and renewing resources. Sappi is a leading global provider of dissolving pulp and of everyday biobased materials created from renewable resources, from packaging paper to biomaterials such as nanocellulose. They’ve been committed to sustainability for decades and a U.N. Global Compact member since 2008. Krelyne Andrew, head of sustainability at Sappi Verve, explains why. “Our goal is to be a trusted, transparent and innovative partner. … By promoting sustainable and innovative approaches to forest management, we ensure that all the benefits of healthy forests are maintained for people and the planet. Biodiversity conservation is a central pillar of our land management.” Biodiversity conservation is a central pillar of land management. In South Africa, she explains, Sappi owns and leases 964,000 acres of land, of which about a third is managed for biodiversity conservation. In North America, Sappi is a founding member of a new risk assessment platform, Forest in Focus, aimed at assessing the health of wood baskets using trusted public data to drive action. Sappi is also accelerating partnerships to help achieve its ambitious goals. Luxury meets biodiversity: Kering In July, Kering announced a dedicated biodiversity strategy with a series of new targets to achieve a “net positive” impact on biodiversity by 2025. It included launching the “Kering for Nature Fund: 1 Million Hectares for the Planet” to support the fashion industry’s transition to regenerative agriculture. Aligned with its long-term commitment to sustainability, Kering’s biodiversity strategy outlines steps to not only minimize biodiversity loss across its global supply chains, but also support nature and create net positive conservation. The strategy encourages the prevention of biodiversity degradation, the promotion of sustainable and regenerative farming practices favoring soil health and the protection of global ecosystems and forests that are vital for carbon sequestration. As Marie-Claire Daveu, Kering’s chief sustainability officer and head of international institutional affairs, describes it: “Thriving biodiversity is intrinsically linked to the long-term viability of our industry, and society more broadly. Integrating a dedicated biodiversity strategy — which is now part of our wider sustainability strategy — into Kering’s day-to-day operations is pivotal for our contribution to bending the curve on biodiversity loss over the next years. Business has a serious role to play in shifting towards a ‘nature-positive’ economy and ahead of the establishment of the Global Goals for biodiversity in 2021, it is important that Kering’s strategy aligns with the scientific community so that we are already on the right path and taking the actions that are urgently needed.” Smaller brands taking bold action: INDIGENOUS INDIGENOUS, which promotes “organic and fair trade fashion,” was founded on the fundamental belief of supporting climate justice. Indigenous peoples own or steward about a quarter of the world’s landmass and are the guardians of more than 70 percent of the earth’s remaining biodiversity. When we think about protecting biodiversity on the planet, indigenous peoples need to participate as a cornerstone of the conversation. As industry begins to realize the importance of protecting biodiversity, Scott Leonard, the company’s CEO, believes business leaders must come together to rebuild the rights of nature economy and align on accountable supply chain practices. “The road ahead to adopt business practices that protect biodiversity is an arduous task,” he says. “We need much stronger alignment with all stakeholders in the value chain surrounding industry to adequately scale the rapid adoption of next generation solutions that truly protect our biodiversity. Our current consumption patterns are not an option for our future and yet we continue to allow more deforestation, forest degradation, species extinctions and massive carbon loss as each day goes by.” Collaborative leadership: Fashion Pact The Fashion Pact — more than 60 CEOs from the industry’s leading companies, representing more than 200 brands — is focusing on the collaborative action needed to bring solutions to a global scale. Alongside setting seven tangible targets for climate, biodiversity and oceans, the companies are beginning their first collaborative activity on biodiversity. “We are very excited for the launch of the Textile Exchange Biodiversity Benchmark,” said Eva von Alvensleben, executive director of the Fashion Pact. “Not only is this a step forward for our signatories in advancing on their global commitments but [this] will allow for the development of a common understanding of the information needed to shape effective biodiversity strategies as an industry.” It’s clear that we have a mountain to climb, but I am encouraged by the number and ambition of new commitments on biodiversity from companies of all market segments and parts of the supply network. Meaningful change requires bold action, and we hope we can provide a catalyst for this within the textile industry with the Biodiversity Benchmark. Pull Quote The aim is to integrate biodiversity into existing materials and sourcing strategies, rather than approach biodiversity as a new or disconnected topic. Topics Supply Chain Biodiversity Apparel Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Image credit: Sappi

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New benchmark shows that biodiversity is in fashion

Booming secondhand clothing sales could help curb the sustainability crisis in fashion

November 27, 2020 by  
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Booming secondhand clothing sales could help curb the sustainability crisis in fashion Hyejune Park Fri, 11/27/2020 – 01:00 A massive force is reshaping the fashion industry: secondhand clothing. According to a new report, the U.S. secondhand clothing market is projected to more than triple in value in the next 10 years  — from $28 billion in 2019 to $80 billion in 2029 — in a U.S. market currently worth $379 billion . In 2019, secondhand clothing expanded 21 times faster than conventional apparel retail did. Even more transformative is secondhand clothing’s potential to dramatically alter the prominence of fast fashion — a business model characterized by cheap and disposable clothing that emerged in the early 2000s, epitomized by brands such as H&M and Zara. Fast fashion grew exponentially over the next two decades, significantly altering the fashion landscape by producing more clothing, distributing it faster and encouraging consumers to buy in excess with low prices. While fast fashion is expected to continue to grow 20 percent in the next 10 years, secondhand fashion is poised to grow 185 percent . As researchers who study clothing consumption and sustainability, we think the secondhand clothing trend has the potential to reshape the fashion industry and mitigate the industry’s detrimental environmental impact on the planet. The next big thing The secondhand clothing market is composed of two major categories, thrift stores and resale platforms. But the latter largely has fueled the recent boom. Secondhand clothing has long been perceived as worn out and tainted, mainly sought by bargain or treasure hunters . However, this perception has changed, and now many consumers consider secondhand clothing to be of identical or even superior quality to unworn clothing. A trend of “fashion flipping”  — or buying secondhand clothes and reselling them — also has emerged, particularly among young consumers. While fast fashion is expected to continue to grow 20% in the next 10 years, secondhand fashion is poised to grow 185%. Thanks to growing consumer demand and new digital platforms such as Tradesy and Poshmark that facilitate peer-to-peer exchange of everyday clothing, the digital resale market is quickly becoming the next big thing in the fashion industry. The market for secondhand luxury goods is also substantial. Retailers such as The RealReal or the Vestiaire Collective provide a digital marketplace for authenticated luxury consignment, where people buy and sell designer labels such as Louis Vuitton, Chanel and Hermès. The market value of this sector reached $2 billion in 2019 . The secondhand clothing trend also appears to be driven by affordability, especially now, during the COVID-19 economic crisis . Consumers not only have reduced their consumption of nonessential items such as clothing , but also are buying more quality garments over cheap, disposable attire. For clothing resellers, the ongoing economic contraction combined with the increased interest in sustainability has proven to be a winning combination. More mindful consumers? The fashion industry has long been associated with social and environmental problems, ranging from poor treatment of garment workers to pollution and waste generated by clothing production. Less than 1 percent of materials used to make clothing are recycled to make new clothing, a $500 billion annual loss for the fashion industry . The textile industry produces more carbon emissions than the airline and maritime industries combined . And about 20 percent of water pollution across the globe is the result of wastewater from the production and finishing of textiles. Consumers have become more aware of the ecological impact of apparel production and are more frequently demanding apparel businesses expand their commitment to sustainability . Buying secondhand clothing could provide consumers a way to push back against the fast-fashion system. Worldwide, in the past 15 years, the average number of times a garment is worn before it’s trashed has decreased by 36%. Buying secondhand clothing increases the number of owners an item will have, extending its life — something dramatically shortened in the age of fast fashion . (Worldwide, in the past 15 years, the average number of times a garment is worn before it’s trashed has decreased by 36 percent.) High-quality clothing traded in the secondhand marketplace also retains its value over time , unlike cheaper fast-fashion products. Thus, buying a high-quality secondhand garment instead of a new one is theoretically an environmental win. But some critics argue the secondhand marketplace actually encourages excess consumption by expanding access to cheap clothing . Our latest research supports this possibility . We interviewed young American women who regularly use digital platforms such as Poshmark. They saw secondhand clothing as a way to access both cheap goods and ones they ordinarily could not afford. They did not see it as an alternative model of consumption or a way to decrease dependence on new clothing production. Whatever the consumer motive, increasing the reuse of clothing is a big step toward a new normal in the fashion industry, although its potential to address sustainability woes remains to be seen. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Pull Quote While fast fashion is expected to continue to grow 20% in the next 10 years, secondhand fashion is poised to grow 185%. Worldwide, in the past 15 years, the average number of times a garment is worn before it’s trashed has decreased by 36%. Contributors Cosette Marie Joyner Armstrong Topics Circular Economy Fashion Apparel Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Photo by  gabriel12  on Shutterstock.

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Booming secondhand clothing sales could help curb the sustainability crisis in fashion

Redress winner launches puffer jacket made of upcycled materials

November 16, 2020 by  
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U.K. designer Maddie Williams has recently launched a sustainable puffer jacket after winning the Redress Design Award 2019, one of the world’s largest sustainable fashion design competitions. Created in collaboration with major Chinese fashion brand JBNY Group, the sustainable puffer jacket is made with a mix of upcycled and recycled materials , including deadstock fabrics for the exterior and recycled polyester for the lining. The jacket now retails in over 100 stores in China. After placing first in the 2019 Redress Design Award, Maddie Williams joined the Hangzhou-headquartered JNBY Group to launch a sustainable garment for its fashion brand ‘less’ to be sold in more than 100 of its stores. The young designer drew on the patchworking technique from her zero-waste Redress Design Award collection, ‘The Mourners’, to create a multicolored puffer jacket stuffed with repurposed duck and goose down collected from post-consumer duvets and pillows. Related: This clothing tech company is 3D-printing garments to help reduce waste “It was an immersive and authentic experience of working in the fashion industry,” Williams said. “With the guidance and translation of the JNBY team I spoke to in-house pattern cutters and knit technicians, did sample fittings, looked through deadstock fabric and picked trims in their giant storerooms. It was a very dynamic and fast-paced place to work; you could request something in the morning and get it back in the afternoon. Being able to do this gave me my first genuine insight of the realities of creating a collection for retail — and it was a unique experience to have been involved in all of the steps.” In collaborating with Williams, JNBY Group has also worked together with Redress, the Hong Kong-based environmental NGO that aims to prevent and transform textile waste in the fashion industry through education and initiatives such as the Redesign Design Award. The Redesign Design Award 2021 will begin accepting applications from emerging designers worldwide on January 8, 2021.  + Redress Design Award Images via Redress

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Redress winner launches puffer jacket made of upcycled materials

Affordable and sustainable fashion trends for fall

October 26, 2020 by  
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The changing of the seasons always signals a change in style. But no season is as hard to dress for as fall. You have to be prepared for all kinds of weather, yet you still want to look put together. With the ongoing pandemic, it’s also important to be cozy and comfortable as you spend more time at home. So how can you dress for fall, dress for style and make sure you’re still doing it with comfort and sustainability in mind? There are many clothing brands that are dedicated to ethical, eco-friendly clothing that won’t break your budget. Jeans Jeans are truly the cornerstone of great fall fashion. They’re perfect in all weather situations, and they complement every fall 2020 trend from velvet blouses to platform boots. MUD Jeans is committed to maintaining an environmental standard with every pair of jeans it produces. It uses eco-friendly materials like recycled cotton and non-toxic dyes. As a company, MUD jeans closely monitors health and safety issues for all employees as well as its own supply chain to ensure that sustainable practices are followed. PETA has rated MUD Jeans as vegan . Activewear Activewear is really shining in 2020 as more people turn to yoga pants for lounging or workout clothes to keep up their fitness routines at home. Workout clothes are a great go-to for casual autumn outfits. They’re already designed to work well in layered outfits, and they’re available in a wide range of colors and designs so you can show off your personality. Vege Threads offers cotton activewear that is 100% certified Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). Vege Threads clothing is made in Australia, where all products are certified by Ethical Clothing Australia. The supply chain is audited to ensure that all workers are treated and compensated ethically and fairly. Jewelry An outfit just isn’t complete without a little jewelry , which can also elevate any outfit for your next virtual meeting or happy hour. With the ongoing pandemic, jewelry has become one of the simplest ways to elevate your work-from-home outfit. Complete your wardrobe with jewelry from makers like Bario Neal . This ethical designer makes handmade rings with conflict-free gems and diamonds. Using recycled jewelry and recycled packaging, Bario Neal traces its entire supply chain and sources fair-trade materials. Article22 is another company to consider when purchasing jewelry for your fall outfits. This jewelry is handmade in Laos using recycled materials — namely shrapnel from the Vietnam War. Article22 ‘s mission is to not only provide beautiful jewelry but to improve social conditions in Laos by turning shrapnel into jewelry and clearing contaminated land. Accessories The scarf is fall’s quintessential accessory. A scarf can instantly add personality and class to any outfit. Frances Austen makes ethical cashmere scarves that are soft, beautiful and sustainably made with spun yarn. Each scarf is completely traceable all the way to the source. Cashmere is wrinkle-resistant and with Frances Austen, it’s responsibly sourced. The company’s clothing and accessories are made in Scotland in a family-owned factory that has been in business for 200 years. Related: These biodegradable sweaters ditch fast fashion in favor of sustainable cashmere New to this season, masks are the “it” item for fall 2020. By now, plenty of people and brands are making comfortable, stylish and eco-friendly reusable masks to match any outfit. Check Etsy for a wide range of handmade options, from plain to patterned to embroidered. Footwear Your choose can make or break a fall outfit. For one, fall footwear needs to be functional. As the weather turns cold, you want shoes that can keep your feet warm and hold their ground when ice and snow are around. It doesn’t hurt to have shoes that are stylish to boot, whether you go with flats, sneakers, mules or boots. If you’re on the hunt for a new pair to invest in for your fall wardrobe, you can find all of these styles at Everlane . This sustainable fashion company maintains a policy of “Radical Transparency”, so you know where its materials come from and how the products are made. This footwear is ethically made with recycled materials and a strong commitment to sustainability. Dresses Take all the guesswork out of getting dressed with cute dresses from Pact . No need to stare at your closet, wondering which separates will pair best together. Pact offers comfortable, chic and ethically made dresses that will look just as cute while you are at the pumpkin patch as they will when you are on the couch. Pact clothing is made in factories that follow fair-trade clothing guidelines. Everything is also made with organic cotton . Outerwear Fall weather isn’t always warm and welcoming. On those blustery days, you need jackets and vests to keep yourself warm. Patagonia has a gorgeous selection of outerwear items in varying styles. That includes puffy parkas, short jackets, hooded coats and vests, all of which are on-trend for fall 2020. Patagonia even offers a Worn Wear program , wear you can purchase used gear to save money and the resources required in making new garments . Best of all, Patagonia is a champion of change. This company engages in activism to prevent mining, protect public lands and save the planet. Patagonia is all about being active, getting involved and doing its part to promote not just sustainable clothing but also global change. Images via Ryan Wheatley / Vege Threads, Orders Mudjeans (MUD Jeans), Article22, Austin Wade and Adobe Stock

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Affordable and sustainable fashion trends for fall

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