Virtually visit these 10 farm sanctuaries on July 25

July 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Virtually visit these 10 farm sanctuaries on July 25

On July 25, animal lovers are invited to participate in a virtual animal sanctuary tour that will let them peek into 10 American sanctuaries. The  Great Farm Sanctuary Tour , organized by Lancaster Farm Sanctuary in Pennsylvania, will raise money to help these nonprofits continue caring for their rescued  animals . The Northeast, Midwest,  California , Colorado, Texas and Hawaii will be represented on the virtual tour. This event will run from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and costs $25. Each sanctuary gets a 20-minute slot to introduce who they are and what they do. Related: Jon & Tracey Stewart’s animal rescue in New Jersey to join the Farm Sanctuary family “Being the only  vegan sanctuary in our region, it is so great to be able to connect with other wonderful organizations that hold the same overarching mission,” Brittany Kane of Foreverland Farm Sanctuary in Amelia, Ohio, told VegNews. “FLF is a new, small sanctuary and we are ecstatic to be able share our work with folks nationwide. We’re looking forward to meeting everyone on our tour, and learning about the great work being done all over for the animals.” Farm animal sanctuaries rescue animals from factory farms. Animal lovers — especially those from urban areas — thrill at the chance to rub a pig’s belly or look a cow in the eye. Many vegans like to visit farm sanctuaries when they travel. Of course, the  coronavirus  pandemic has taken a huge bite out of travel and axed millions of jobs. For nonprofits like animal sanctuaries, money is even tighter than usual. To support these sanctuaries, buy your ticket and tune in on July 25. Perhaps you’ll virtually meet Grandpa Pancakes, a 30-something-year-old horse in Woodstown,  New Jersey ‘s Rancho Relaxo that was saved from the slaughterhouse. Or Yoru, an orphaned Polynesian piglet found scrounging for scrap by a hiking trail, who now resides at the Aloha Animal Sanctuary, Oahu’s first nonprofit sanctuary for farmed animals. The Great Farm Sanctuary Tour is matching donations given to these farm sanctuaries via this event up to $1,000–5,000, depending on ticket sales and sponsorships. + Lancaster Farms Sanctuary Via Veg News Images via Pexels

Original post:
Virtually visit these 10 farm sanctuaries on July 25

Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

July 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

A tale of determination, exploration and sustainability, architects Guylee Simmonds and David Schnabel are taking the trip of a lifetime on a repurposed, retired Arctic lifeboat. Along with their seafaring dog, Shackleton the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, these two architects have given a second life to a decommissioned lifeboat that served in the Western Isles of Scotland. While the boat was originally designed to carry 100 people in survival situations, Simmonds and Schnabel set out to repurpose and rebuild it into a self-sustaining expedition vessel. The goal was to complete the project in a little over one year, just in time to take a 3,000 mile adventure from the U.K. to the Norwegian Arctic. Related: A solar-powered houseboat designed for the water-loving adventurer The architects renamed the boat Stødig, a Norwegian word meaning “sound and steadfast.” As the name suggests, the lifeboat’s reliable and functional design was a large inspiration for its newly adapted role as a self-sustaining and minimalist expedition vessel. The lifeboat , which was on its way to being scrapped if it had found no buyer, was bought in February 2018, and the voyage began in May 2019. The team departed from the southern British port of Newhaven before traveling along the Belgian and Dutch coast, sailing through the Kiel canal in Germany and then venturing into the Baltic Sea. The scenic route took them up the Danish and Swedish coasts past Copenhagen and Gothenburg, past Norway and up to Bergen. All along the way, Simmonds, Schnabel and Shackleton took in some of the best views the world has to offer, from showstopping sunsets and the dreamy Northern Lights to hushed evergreen forests and magnificent, snow-covered mountain landscapes. Stødig was first gutted to provide the architects with a blank canvas, on which they could bring their ideas to life. The boat redesign incorporates two forward cabins, a dining area, kitchen, a bathroom with a composting toilet, bunk beds for guests and a stern cockpit. There are solar panels on the roof, a wood-burning stove and small wind turbines incorporated for additional sustainability. It is made of fiberglass, measuring 11 meters long and 3.5 meters wide. An important feature for exploration, a number of large, curved windows were installed to provide breathtaking panoramic views and bring in as much light as possible. + Stødig Arctic Lifeboat Images via Guylee Simmonds and David Schnabel

See original here: 
Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

Can Large Solar Farms Create Pollinator Habitat?

September 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Can Large Solar Farms Create Pollinator Habitat?

Pollinators play a crucial role in ecosystems. They are instrumental … The post Can Large Solar Farms Create Pollinator Habitat? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read more here:
Can Large Solar Farms Create Pollinator Habitat?

New ‘agrihood’ coming to the Island of Hawaii

June 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New ‘agrihood’ coming to the Island of Hawaii

In a first for the Big Island of Hawaii, a new sustainable “ agrihood ” known as Kuwili Lani, Hawaiian for “to embrace the heavens,” has received final subdivision approval and properties in this new neighborhood are now available to the public. An agrihood is an organized sustainable community that, rather than being built around a pool or a golf course, is centered on spaces designed for community food production. Backed by Big Island Sustainable Homes, LLP, the Kuwili Lani project is the result of over ten years of research and organizing which are now bearing fruit. Now that the infrastructure in the gated community is complete, lots are available for purchase from mid-$200k to mid-$300k. Located on the Hamakua Coast in Laupahoehoe, Kuwili Lani is designed with sustainability in mind across the board. From the community’s independence from the energy grid, made possible by on-site wind and solar power generation, to each of the eleven one-acre lots being zoned for agricultural use, Kuwili Lani intends to offer its residents a unique, sustainable lifestyle only 25 miles from the nearby city of Hilo. The community’s careful use of natural resources is also reflected in its sustainable rain harvesting for outdoor, agricultural use; the potable county water supply will be piped into the community. Related: Hawaii just set the most ambitious climate goal of any US state: carbon neutral by 2045 Although there may be communal food production plots, individual plot owners are encouraged to grow their own food on their own lots. Neighbors may coordinate to determine what the community needs and then delegate, so that Kuwili Lani may be able to provide its own fruit, vegetables, and even seafood right on site. Overall, the new sustainable community is aimed at those who want to be good stewards of the Earth while also taking charge of their own lives. “Kuwili Lani is based on the principle of being independent and in charge of one’s own destiny,” Michael Whelan, managing partner for Big Island Sustainable Homes, LLP, said in a statement. “We wanted to create a path for people to follow who are aware of the way their lifestyle impacts our environment.” Via Kuwili Lani Images via Hawaii Life Real Estate Brokers

See original here:
New ‘agrihood’ coming to the Island of Hawaii

How the natural products industry is building a climate movement

March 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How the natural products industry is building a climate movement

Guayaki, Organic Valley and Straus Family Farms are among the leaders advancing carbon-positive and renewable solutions.

See the original post:
How the natural products industry is building a climate movement

Community Solar Farms

March 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Community Solar Farms

Renters, apartment dwellers, condominium owners, and people with shaded roofs are … The post Community Solar Farms appeared first on Earth911.com.

Excerpt from:
Community Solar Farms

Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security?

February 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security?

With a global population of 7.6 billion people, there is … The post Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Continued here:
Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security?

This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

October 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

Did you know there is a way to grow tons of fresh fruits and vegetables with saltwater and solar energy ? The good people at SunDrop Farms are doing just that with their Australian operation, where they grow 15 percent of the nation’s tomatoes. Seawater is piped in from a nearby gulf, desalinated using the reflected heat of the sun , and sprinkled on hydroponically grown produce in a revolutionary, renewable cycle of production. SunDrop Farms’ operation is fossil fuel -free, freshwater-free, and soil-free, eliminating the need for some of the most financially and environmentally costly elements in the agriculture business. The company told Aljazeera their sustainable method of growing produce slashes “26,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide ” and 180 Olympic-sized swimming pools of fresh water each year, which is just what a rapidly growing population needs to offset human demand on Mother Earth. Related: Solar-powered Ring Garden marries desalination and agriculture for drought-stricken California A field of mirrors surround a massive solar tower, which reflect the sun onto this central point. The tower heats up to provide a steady temperature for the greenhouses and to desalinate one million liters of seawater per day. The tomatoes on their Australian farm are grown hydroponically in coconut coir and 15,000 tonnes are sold exclusively to the local Coles grocery chain every year. SunDrop Farms has locations in Australia, the UK, and the US and hopes to expand “cutting-edge, sustainable technology” to other locales in the near future. +SunDrop Farms Via Aljazeera Images via SunDrop Farms

Read the original here: 
This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

July 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

Bacteria are often associated with disease – but in the future they could serve as a potent power source. University of Oxford researchers recently used bacteria to spin rotors in tiny ‘ wind farms ‘ – and they think these microscopic engines could power small electronic components like smartphone microphones. If you’ve ever looked at bacteria under a microscope, you’ve probably seen a lot of random movement. Under ordinary circumstances, there’s not yet a way to get power from that spontaneous motion. Oxford researchers immersed a ” lattice of 64 symmetric microrotors ” into fluid filled with bacteria, and found the bacteria organized their movement in such a way that the microrotors spun in opposite directions – kind of like a wind farm. This organized movement creates a steady stream of power. Related: Can bacteria help curb the spread of the Zika virus? The paper’s co-author Tyler Shendruk said in an Oxford press release , “When we did the simulation with a single rotor in the bacterial turbulence, it just got kicked around randomly. But when we put an array of rotors in the living fluid, they suddenly formed a regular pattern, with neighboring rotors spinning in opposite directions.” We probably won’t be powering homes with bacteria any time soon – but this teeny power source could be beneficial for micromachines . The team said these little wind farms could also drive ” devices that are self-assembled and self-powered .” Another paper co-author, Julia Yeomans, said ” Nature is brilliant at creating tiny engines, and there is enormous potential if we can understand how to exploit similar designs.” + Science Advances Via Gizmag Images via Sumesh P. Thampi1, Amin Doostmohammadi, Tyler N. Shendruk, Ramin Golestanian, and Julia M. Yeomans

Excerpt from:
Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

Freight Farms are super efficient hydroponic farms built inside shipping containers

March 17, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Freight Farms are super efficient hydroponic farms built inside shipping containers

Read the rest of Freight Farms are super efficient hydroponic farms built inside shipping containers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: energy efficient farming , farming app , Freight Farms , green technology , hydroponic farm , hydroponics , retrofitted shipping containers , shipping containers , Urban Farming

Read more from the original source: 
Freight Farms are super efficient hydroponic farms built inside shipping containers

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1166 access attempts in the last 7 days.