Can Large Solar Farms Create Pollinator Habitat?

September 18, 2018 by  
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Pollinators play a crucial role in ecosystems. They are instrumental … The post Can Large Solar Farms Create Pollinator Habitat? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Can Large Solar Farms Create Pollinator Habitat?

New ‘agrihood’ coming to the Island of Hawaii

June 13, 2018 by  
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In a first for the Big Island of Hawaii, a new sustainable “ agrihood ” known as Kuwili Lani, Hawaiian for “to embrace the heavens,” has received final subdivision approval and properties in this new neighborhood are now available to the public. An agrihood is an organized sustainable community that, rather than being built around a pool or a golf course, is centered on spaces designed for community food production. Backed by Big Island Sustainable Homes, LLP, the Kuwili Lani project is the result of over ten years of research and organizing which are now bearing fruit. Now that the infrastructure in the gated community is complete, lots are available for purchase from mid-$200k to mid-$300k. Located on the Hamakua Coast in Laupahoehoe, Kuwili Lani is designed with sustainability in mind across the board. From the community’s independence from the energy grid, made possible by on-site wind and solar power generation, to each of the eleven one-acre lots being zoned for agricultural use, Kuwili Lani intends to offer its residents a unique, sustainable lifestyle only 25 miles from the nearby city of Hilo. The community’s careful use of natural resources is also reflected in its sustainable rain harvesting for outdoor, agricultural use; the potable county water supply will be piped into the community. Related: Hawaii just set the most ambitious climate goal of any US state: carbon neutral by 2045 Although there may be communal food production plots, individual plot owners are encouraged to grow their own food on their own lots. Neighbors may coordinate to determine what the community needs and then delegate, so that Kuwili Lani may be able to provide its own fruit, vegetables, and even seafood right on site. Overall, the new sustainable community is aimed at those who want to be good stewards of the Earth while also taking charge of their own lives. “Kuwili Lani is based on the principle of being independent and in charge of one’s own destiny,” Michael Whelan, managing partner for Big Island Sustainable Homes, LLP, said in a statement. “We wanted to create a path for people to follow who are aware of the way their lifestyle impacts our environment.” Via Kuwili Lani Images via Hawaii Life Real Estate Brokers

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New ‘agrihood’ coming to the Island of Hawaii

How the natural products industry is building a climate movement

March 23, 2018 by  
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Guayaki, Organic Valley and Straus Family Farms are among the leaders advancing carbon-positive and renewable solutions.

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How the natural products industry is building a climate movement

Community Solar Farms

March 23, 2018 by  
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Renters, apartment dwellers, condominium owners, and people with shaded roofs are … The post Community Solar Farms appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Community Solar Farms

Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security?

February 28, 2018 by  
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With a global population of 7.6 billion people, there is … The post Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Can Land-Based Fish Farms Promote Food Security?

This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

October 24, 2016 by  
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Did you know there is a way to grow tons of fresh fruits and vegetables with saltwater and solar energy ? The good people at SunDrop Farms are doing just that with their Australian operation, where they grow 15 percent of the nation’s tomatoes. Seawater is piped in from a nearby gulf, desalinated using the reflected heat of the sun , and sprinkled on hydroponically grown produce in a revolutionary, renewable cycle of production. SunDrop Farms’ operation is fossil fuel -free, freshwater-free, and soil-free, eliminating the need for some of the most financially and environmentally costly elements in the agriculture business. The company told Aljazeera their sustainable method of growing produce slashes “26,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide ” and 180 Olympic-sized swimming pools of fresh water each year, which is just what a rapidly growing population needs to offset human demand on Mother Earth. Related: Solar-powered Ring Garden marries desalination and agriculture for drought-stricken California A field of mirrors surround a massive solar tower, which reflect the sun onto this central point. The tower heats up to provide a steady temperature for the greenhouses and to desalinate one million liters of seawater per day. The tomatoes on their Australian farm are grown hydroponically in coconut coir and 15,000 tonnes are sold exclusively to the local Coles grocery chain every year. SunDrop Farms has locations in Australia, the UK, and the US and hopes to expand “cutting-edge, sustainable technology” to other locales in the near future. +SunDrop Farms Via Aljazeera Images via SunDrop Farms

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This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

July 12, 2016 by  
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Bacteria are often associated with disease – but in the future they could serve as a potent power source. University of Oxford researchers recently used bacteria to spin rotors in tiny ‘ wind farms ‘ – and they think these microscopic engines could power small electronic components like smartphone microphones. If you’ve ever looked at bacteria under a microscope, you’ve probably seen a lot of random movement. Under ordinary circumstances, there’s not yet a way to get power from that spontaneous motion. Oxford researchers immersed a ” lattice of 64 symmetric microrotors ” into fluid filled with bacteria, and found the bacteria organized their movement in such a way that the microrotors spun in opposite directions – kind of like a wind farm. This organized movement creates a steady stream of power. Related: Can bacteria help curb the spread of the Zika virus? The paper’s co-author Tyler Shendruk said in an Oxford press release , “When we did the simulation with a single rotor in the bacterial turbulence, it just got kicked around randomly. But when we put an array of rotors in the living fluid, they suddenly formed a regular pattern, with neighboring rotors spinning in opposite directions.” We probably won’t be powering homes with bacteria any time soon – but this teeny power source could be beneficial for micromachines . The team said these little wind farms could also drive ” devices that are self-assembled and self-powered .” Another paper co-author, Julia Yeomans, said ” Nature is brilliant at creating tiny engines, and there is enormous potential if we can understand how to exploit similar designs.” + Science Advances Via Gizmag Images via Sumesh P. Thampi1, Amin Doostmohammadi, Tyler N. Shendruk, Ramin Golestanian, and Julia M. Yeomans

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Tiny bacteria ‘wind farms’ could power your smartphone

Freight Farms are super efficient hydroponic farms built inside shipping containers

March 17, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Freight Farms are super efficient hydroponic farms built inside shipping containers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: energy efficient farming , farming app , Freight Farms , green technology , hydroponic farm , hydroponics , retrofitted shipping containers , shipping containers , Urban Farming

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Freight Farms are super efficient hydroponic farms built inside shipping containers

LEED-certified Meadow Farm is a small organic farmstead in northern California

January 30, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of LEED-certified Meadow Farm is a small organic farmstead in northern California Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: farms , green architecture , LEED certified building , LEED platinum , Meadow Farm , modern farm , Northern California , organic farming , pavilions , sustainable farming , William McDonough Partners

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LEED-certified Meadow Farm is a small organic farmstead in northern California

Polish farmers and families blockaded Chevron frackers for 400 days

January 15, 2015 by  
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In July, Chevron abandoned its plans to drill for gas in Zurawlow, Poland, after farmers and families from Zurawlow (and four nearby villages) blockaded a proposed shale drilling site with tractors and other pastoral machinery for 400 days. Now, that victory is inspiring other Poles to fight back against the fracked gas industry. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of Polish farmers and families blockaded Chevron frackers for 400 days Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agro-tourism , ban fracking , Biodiversity , Chevron , Climate Change , contamination , drilling , earth , ECO:nomics , economy , Environment , environmental assessment , Europe , families , farmers , farming , farms , forests , frack , fracked , fracking , gas , government , grassroots , Health , health issues , law , local , natural , natural resources , oil , Poland , political , politics , protected forests , Radunia River , regulations , resistance , rivers , shale boom , shale drilling , shale gas , silica sand , streams , tourism , u.s. , UNESCO , united states , Zurawlow

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Polish farmers and families blockaded Chevron frackers for 400 days

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