Vegetarian restaurant in the Maldives lets guests harvest their own food

February 25, 2019 by  
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Way out in the Indian Ocean, guests at a luxury Soneva resort are participating in the ultimate farm-to-table experience — and they even get to harvest the ingredients for their own dinners. The Soneva Fushi just opened Shades of Green, its new vegetarian restaurant at the exclusive Maldives resort. The seed for the vegetarian restaurant was planted when Copenhagen-based chef Carsten Kyster visited Soneva Fushi as a guest in March 2018. Kyster has worked at the River Café and The Sugar Club in London as well as traveling and working in Southeast Asia over the last 15 years. After eating a lunch made with ingredients from Soneva Fushi’s organic garden, inspiration struck. A year later, the 20-seat Shades of Green welcomes guests for intimate, plant-based dinners. Related: Peek inside the BIG-designed garden village for one of the world’s best restaurants Before dining at the new vegetarian restaurant, guests take a guided tour of the garden , learning about the herbs, fruits and vegetables while picking dinner ingredients. They gather around a fire pit for an appetizer, then move to tables set beneath fruit trees to enjoy the remaining six courses. Dinner can last late into the night. Shades of Green’s menu will change with the seasons and is based around the colors red, green and yellow. Chef Kyster blends Maldivian and other Southeast Asian cuisines with Nordic culinary techniques, such as salting, smoking, pickling and fermenting. The meal is designed to fulfill six categories: cleanse, raw, crispy, grain, fire and sweet. For example, mangosteen kombucha paired with plums, beetroot vinegar powder and shiso leaves is a cleansing dish. A fire dish contains hotter ingredients, such as leeks and pepper sauce. Soneva Fushi is located within the Baa Atoll, a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve coral reef . Guests in the 61 private villas enjoy amenities like an open-air cinema, a high-tech observatory, a glassblowing studio, private butlers and 500 different wines — and now, a vegetarian restaurant, too. + Shades of Green Photography by Julia Neeson via Shades of Green

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Vegetarian restaurant in the Maldives lets guests harvest their own food

6 tips to reduce your foodprint while dining out

November 1, 2018 by  
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When you eat at home, it is relatively easy to make choices that will lower your ‘foodprint,’ because you are in charge of the shopping, preparation and disposal of all the food. But when you eat out at a restaurant or grab takeout, it is much more difficult to eat sustainably. To make it a little bit easier, we have put together six tips to help you eat green while dining out or grabbing something to go. Ask questions Ask your server about the restaurant’s sources. What farms do they buy from? Is this dish in season? If the server doesn’t know, they can ask the manager or the chef. If the restaurant has a philosophy of incorporating seasonality into the menu, the workers will be more than happy to share the food’s origins, and the menu items will change with the seasons. Do your research to know what is in season where you live and what local restaurants embrace seasonality. When you are looking over a restaurant menu, also keep in mind your location and what is in season locally. If you are in a landlocked area, ordering ocean fish isn’t smart, because it certainly isn’t local. If you live in Missouri and it’s the middle of winter, tomatoes are not in season. Get a box American restaurants are famous for the extra-large portions of food that they pile up on plates, making it nearly impossible to finish the meal in one sitting. According to Sustainable America , the average restaurant meal is eight times larger than the standard USDA and FDA serving sizes, and 55 percent of leftover restaurant food doesn’t get taken home. Related: 5 simple ways to reduce your food waste right now Big meals mean even bigger waste. Instead of leaving behind food and letting it go straight to the trash, ask for a box. It will help cut down the food waste, and it gives you an instant lunch for the next day. If you don’t want to take leftovers home, consider splitting a large appetizer or entree with your dining partner. Choose farm-to-table Farm-to-table is one of the most popular buzzwords of the moment, and many restaurants have been more than willing to capitalize on the trend. More chefs have started to incorporate local and seasonal items on their menus, and some restaurants have even started growing their own food. Eating at a restaurant that locally sources its ingredients results in a major downsize of your foodprint, because there is no need to ship the ingredients across the country. Just make sure that the restaurant is truly farm-to-table — that’s when asking the right questions becomes important. Just say no If you don’t want that basket of rolls or chips they automatically put on the table, just say no. Tell your server not to bring it, so it isn’t wasted. The same thing goes for items on your entree. If you don’t want onions on your burger, tell your server to leave them off it. If you don’t want that side of coleslaw, ask for a substitution or tell them to skip it completely. Watch buffet portions To reduce your food waste at a buffet, use smaller plates. People who use large plates waste 135 percent more food than those who use smaller plates. Watch your portions when enjoying a buffet, or avoid going to one. Decline takeout bags, utensils and condiments When you order takeout, reduce your carbon footprint by bringing your own coffee or water cups, saying no to straws and plastic bags and declining plastic utensils and napkins. You can bring your own reusable container and see if the restaurant is willing to use it. Say no to extra condiments and seasonings. All of these to-go items might seem convenient, but they often end up in the trash. Instead, just grab the food, and use the cutlery, condiments and seasonings that you have at home. If you really do need some of the extras like sauces or condiments, only take what you need. When you dine out, you can eat sustainably by keeping these tips in mind. Just remember to choose the right restaurants, ask questions and minimize your food packaging and waste , and you will be doing your part to reduce your foodprint. Via Foodprint and  Sustainable America Images via Steffen Kastner , Thabang Mokoena  and Shutterstock

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6 tips to reduce your foodprint while dining out

IKEA’s Space10 is creating on-site aquaponic farms for restaurant supply

June 9, 2016 by  
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Using LED lights from the IKEA RYDDA/VÄXER hydroponic garden , which will be available in the US next year, along with some good old classic shelves and plastic bins, Space10 has created a farm in a tiny basement room of their studio in Copenhagen. Over 80 percent of the supplies to create the farm came straight from IKEA, hacked to suit the purpose, of course. The entire project shows how technology and nature can combine to create a sustainable future – from the sounds of birds chirping, which came from a nearby iPad (plants are reported to grow better when they are surrounded by the sounds of their natural habitat), to the green sprouts peeking out of their earthy substrate. Related: IKEA reaches for net positive energy status in the next four years Space10 looked at the question of how we can make a positive impact on the planet from a different perspective. They toyed around with the idea of creating a shower alarm that lets you know when a person has used too much water until they realized not only is the shower one of the last places we can escape technology, you’d have to skip showers for months to equal the water used in one hamburger. So they shifted gears and started asking how they could make a burger water-friendly. The solution? Bugs. Combined with on-site grown herbs and lettuces, the combination turns a classic unsustainable American meal into one with very little impact on the planet. For lunch, Space10 served Inhabitat a meal that showed how food could be supplied right on site and have little impact on the environment. We were each given a miniature garden that we harvested and placed on top of our bugburger, made from mealworm, beetroot and gluten, which was shockingly tasty thanks to chef Simon Perez . Along with a side of surprise fries (also containing insects), the meal showed how beautiful, delicious and sustainable the future of food can be. Space10 hopes to illustrate how food supplies can be pushed into the future, and our host Carla  likened the situation to the human body: when we get sick, we eat healthier, take better care of ourselves, exercise and do our best to feel better. Right now, the planet is sick, and we need to help care for it in order to heal it. A sustainable food supply is key, and it can start right at home – or in this case – right in the restaurant. Space10 is going to test the aquaponics concept in the IKEA restaurant in Malmö, Sweden. No word on whether the bugburger will be hitting your lunch plate any time soon. Photos by Kristine Lofgren for Inhabitat

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IKEA’s Space10 is creating on-site aquaponic farms for restaurant supply

California’s first farm-to-table community makes eating local easy

September 1, 2015 by  
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6 uses for amaranth that may surprise you

September 1, 2015 by  
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Three Buns Restaurant in Jakarta Offers Lung-Pleasing Greenhouse-Style Dining

May 26, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Three Buns Restaurant in Jakarta Offers Lung-Pleasing Greenhouse-Style Dining Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Adam Penney , Architecture , dining in jakarta , farm to table , food design , greenhouse dining , indonesia , Kebayoran Baru , PTT Group , restaurant design , Three Buns Restaurant

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Three Buns Restaurant in Jakarta Offers Lung-Pleasing Greenhouse-Style Dining

World’s Largest Rooftop Farm Kicks Off Second Growing Season in Brooklyn

April 19, 2011 by  
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Did you know that the world’s largest rooftop farm is located in NYC?

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