TikTok star Joanne Molinaro launches "The Korean Vegan" cookbook

October 13, 2021 by  
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Joanne Lee Molinaro is a trial lawyer, marathon runner and TikTok sensation as @thekoreanvegan. The Chicagoan took time out of her busy schedule to talk about her debut cookbook/memoir “The Korean Vegan” released on Tuesday, Oct. 12. Here’s what she had to say about being one of the best-known Korean vegans. Buy “The Korean Vegan” on Amazon Inhabitat: How did you decide to adopt a plant-based diet? Molinaro: I decided to adopt a plant-based diet at the suggestion of my then boyfriend (now husband). At his urging, I watched a lot of movies and read a lot of books about the impact animal agriculture had on health and climate change and grew more open to the idea of going plant-based. I also worried that if I didn’t join him in this change in diet that it would inject a complication into a fairly nascent relationship.  Accordingly, I decided to give it a try on a probationary basis.  Ultimately, it ended up being far easier than I expected. Also during that time, my father grew ill with prostate cancer , and given what I’d read in my research regarding the link between the consumption of red meat and cancer, I felt it best that I discontinue eating meat permanently. Related: Cooking inspiration from vegan recipes all over the world Inhabitat: How did your Korean-American family and friends respond to that decision? Molinaro: Many of them were skeptical or simply confused by the decision.  Some of them said, “But how can you be vegan? You’re Korean!” Lots of people — including Korean Americans — believe that Korean food is very meat-centric (think Korean BBQ) and, therefore, Korean people can’t be vegan. My family simply assumed that I was just trying to lose weight (and, to be honest, the thought did cross my mind at the time, even though weight loss no longer has anything to do with why I’m vegan). Now, though, I believe both my family and friends have seen just how much closer to my heritage going vegan has brought me and that it’s far more than a diet to me. Inhabitat:  Which traditional Korean dishes lend themselves especially well to a vegan interpretation? Molinaro: There’s a whole segment of Korean cuisine that is already largely plant based — Buddhist Temple Cuisine. Prepared by Korean Buddhist nuns, the food is consistent with the philosophy of “do as little harm as possible.” As such, the nuns avoid using animal products when cooking (e.g. they do not use fish sauce when fermenting kimchi).  While the ingredients are often thought of as “humble” because they do not incorporate meat (which still symbolizes wealth in Korea), in fact, many of these dishes come straight out of the kitchens of Korean courtesans — women who served in the Korean palaces often remained unmarried for their tenure and retired to Buddhist temples, where they then shared their knowledge of palace cuisine. It’s no wonder that entirely plant-based restaurants in Korea are now Michelin rated eateries — the food is stunning, flavorful and totally vegan. Otherwise, many of the banchan (or side dishes) lend themselves well to being “veganized.” Most banchan highlight pickled or seasoned vegetables and, often times, all you have to do is remove the fish sauce to render them completely plant based. A good example of this is kimchi.  Inhabitat: Any Korean dishes that were really hard to veganize?  Molinaro: The hardest thing I’ve had to veganize thus far is a good broth. Many Korean stews start out with a very rich pork or beef broth. Developing a vegetable broth that could provide the same kind of complexity and depth was challenging, but my upcoming cookbook includes a vegetable broth that is excellent. I’m quite proud of it! Inhabitat: What do you think is special about Korean food? Molinaro: I think banchan is what makes Korean food so unique. There are usually anywhere from 10 to 20 of these small dishes on a Korean dining table at dinner . Sometimes referred to as “garnishes,” the role of banchan is truly to maximize each mouthful of food (i.e. the perfect bite). Korean food teaches the palate to appreciate a combination of flavors and textures, how they interplay and enhance each other.  For example, instead of simply focusing on your protein , moving to your carbs and then nibbling on your salad. Each spoonful is an opportunity to craft a mouthwatering mosaic of complementary tastes that might include a little rice, some protein, a sliver of some pickled vegetable, all followed by a piping hot spoonful of soybean stew — salty, tart, soft, crunchy, hot and cold all come together to form a unique blend of deliciousness. Inhabitat: Tell us a little bit about your new cookbook. Molinaro: My new cookbook is designed to live up to the aphorism: “Love my food? Love my people.” I want people to see how varied Korean cuisine is — it’s not just Korean BBQ.  I also want them to see how easy it is to infuse flavors from your childhood into new plant-based favorites so that you can always retain that connection to your heritage and culture. Finally, I want people to fall in love with my family — the people behind my food. Inhabitat: What are the pros and cons to being a famous vegan on social media? Molinaro: I totally don’t think I’m famous! Believe me — my husband and dog, Rudy, would disabuse me of such a notion pretty quickly! That said, having a large social media following as a vegan, does give me access to an incredible community of plant-based individuals who share so many of the same values as I do — whether it’s a love of animals , a sense of stewardship over the planet or mindful eating in general. I am so grateful to the plant-based community for their vocal and sometimes protective support of my work. Unfortunately, on the flip side of that coin is that my large following subjects me to the trolls — those who think veganism is “unnatural.” Luckily, I don’t get much of that though! Inhabitat: What else would you like readers to know about you?  Molinaro: I used to be addicted to video games and can still go toe-to-toe with the best in Mario Kart! Inhabitat: Would you share a recipe with us? Molinaro: Sure! One of my favorite recipes in the book is the Pecan Paht Pie. It’s perfect for the upcoming holidays and it’s requested by my totally non-vegan family every year! PECAN PAHT ( ????? • Sweet Red Bean) PIE Serves 8-10 Difficulty: Medium Allergens: GFO One Thanksgiving I decided I wanted to make pecan pie that my family would actually eat. We’re not fans of overly sweet desserts, but my father absolutely loves pecans. The answer to creating a less cloyingly sweet filling was simple — paht! Not only is the red bean paste far less sugar-y than the typical custard-like filling of a traditional pecan pie, I knew my family would instantly appreciate the familiar flavor. I presented my little pie that Thanksgiving, and since then I have been asked to make it every year. For the pie crust: 1½ cups (210 grams) all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon salt ? cup (152 grams) cold vegan butter, cut into ½-inch cubes 3 to 4 tablespoons ice water For the pie filling and topping : ¾ cup (300 grams) brown rice syrup 6 tablespoons soy or oat milk 1 cup (320 grams) paht ¼ cup (50 grams) light brown sugar 4 tablespoons (57 grams) vegan butter, melted and cooled ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups (220 gram) chopped pecans 3½ tablespoons (35 gram) potato starch 1 cup (110 gram) pecan halves Steps: 1. Make the pie crust: In a food processor, combine the flour, sugar and salt and pulse while adding the butter, a few pieces at a time. Add the ice water, one tablespoon at a time, until a dough starts to form. 2. Shape the dough into a ball. Do not handle more than necessary. Wrap with plastic and refrigerate for at least four hours, but best if overnight. 3. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 4. Make the pie filling and topping: In a medium bowl, combine the brown rice syrup, soy milk, paht, brown sugar, melted butter, salt , vanilla, chopped pecans and potato starch. 5. Place the pie dough between two sheets of parchment paper. Using a rolling pin, roll out the pie dough gently until it is large enough to line a nine-inch pie pan. Ease the crust into the pan and trim any excess dough at the edges with kitchen shears or a sharp paring knife. Pour in the filling. Top the filling with pecan halves. 6. Transfer the pie to the oven and bake until the pie filling sets (i.e. doesn’t jiggle too much), one hour to one hour 15 minutes. Cool the pie on a wire rack for two hours before serving. Via “The Korean Vegan Cookbook” Images via The Korean Vegan When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn commissions at no cost to you.

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TikTok star Joanne Molinaro launches "The Korean Vegan" cookbook

Siempre Eco is the new wallet-friendly sustainability brand

October 11, 2021 by  
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One of the main barriers many individuals face when choosing to live more sustainably is the cost of environmentally friendly products. Compared to disposable, single-use plastic products, items made from materials like bamboo or organic cotton are often more expensive as they factor in costs of materials, ethical labor and production. Started by Rabia Dhanani, Siempre Eco is a lifestyle startup committed to providing affordable eco-friendly alternatives for everyday items. Upon graduating amid the instability of the pandemic, Dhanani found herself with a lot of spare time. To save some money and keep herself busy, she set out on a mission to try making beeswax wraps, an environmentally friendly alternative to plastic wrap that her family had begun using at home. Beeswax wraps are made from organic cotton sheets with a coating of beeswax, pine resin and jojoba oil. These waxy sheets create an antibacterial layer to keep food fresh for up to two weeks and have a year-long shelf life. However, they can be relatively expensive and often cost upwards of $10 apiece. Related: This long-standing natural soap company started by accident After a few weeks of experimenting with different materials and spending over $400 of her savings, Dhanani’s beeswax wrap trials finally yielded some positive results. She decided to continue this venture and sell the wraps to family and friends as a summer project. As the project gained momentum, Dhanani realized that she could create a meaningful impact on people’s daily lives while keeping her costs and carbon footprint minimal. Siempre Eco aims to provide people with sustainable and affordable alternatives for daily use and self-care items. Since the company values impact over profit, the profit margin is a little lower than that of competitors. In doing so, prices remain consistent, encouraging customers to switch to sustainable alternatives, as they can afford to use them in the long run. Over the past year, Siempre Eco has expanded its collection of products that range from lifestyle to kitchen items, all of which use locally sourced materials and/or ethical manufacturing. The products can now be found in over 40 retail stores in Canada, and the website offers worldwide shipping. The most popular products, besides beeswax wraps, include bamboo straws, shower fizzies and reusable wool dryer balls. Approximately 98% of Siempre Eco’s packaging is recyclable, reusable or biodegradable . A lot of the materials are paper-based and use recycled paper and/or cardboard, including recycled paper boxes, wrapping paper and box filling. Other forms of environmentally-friendly packaging include reusable glass jars, rice paper packaging and even corn mailers, which can be composted after receiving a package. In the near future, Siempre Eco looks forward to preparing curated boxes of products and partnering with other small sustainable businesses to create exciting theme-based bundles. The company is also in discussions with a massive North American retailer to bring the product range to over 400 stores. + Siempre Eco Images courtesy of Siempre Ec o

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Siempre Eco is the new wallet-friendly sustainability brand

Clark Street Composts sets example for Chicago and beyond

October 11, 2021 by  
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The natural world has a system for everything, including a natural waste cycle that turns dead  plants  and trees into food and soil for other living things. It’s called composting, and it’s a system as old as the planet itself. But modern garbage services have traditionally lumped all disposed of items together and hauled them to landfills. In a private-public collaboration, Chicago is tackling this issue by building a model for city-wide composting that can be developed anywhere.  The Andersonville Chamber of Commerce (ACC) has partnered with WasteNot Compost in a project called Clark Street Composts. The initiative is a pilot program the organizers hope will spread to every neighborhood. The program launched in mid-September with a focus on high producers of compostable waste such as  restaurants , bars and other businesses. At the onset, the program has the support of 20 businesses with an interest in diverting compostable waste away from the dump and towards conversion into nutrient-rich soil. Related: The Australian government unveils plan to end plastic pollution Andersonville has a history of embracing environmental and social change in Chicago’s north side, as seen through the Andersonville Recycles program, which launched in 2009. WasteNot is also well-established as an industry leader in composting, earning Treehugger.com’s top rating for the best overall composting company in the U.S. However, even with these resources available, Chicago ranks last in the country in terms of  recycling  habits. According to a press release for Clark Street Composts, “food waste [is] estimated to make up over 50% of landfill contents, and 17% of greenhouse gasses produced in the U.S. are a product of food waste rotting in landfills,” so organizers are hoping to use the program to educate and encourage business owners in regards to composting.  The process works like most other curbside services. WasteNot Compost provides bins and carts for members and informs customers about what items can go into the bin. This includes fruit and vegetable waste, but also lesser-known compostables like cooked and raw  food , meat, dairy products, hair, pet fur, yard waste, compostable products from packaging companies and much more. Many of these items are not recommended for standard backyard composting because they can draw in unwanted animals, and temperatures often don’t get high enough to effectively break down materials as it does at an industrial level.  To provide information on the ins and outs of the program, WasteNot maintains an online membership where customers can find answers and support. The program also provides marketing materials for each business , so they can promote their environmental actions and help educate the public. ACC and WasteNot help promote the businesses to those looking to support environmentally-minded establishments.  The process offered by Clark Street Composts has a multi-tiered effect. Not only does it lower emissions in the landfill and divert the amount of  waste , but it also minimizes rodent problems in alleyways and smells in the city and at home. WasteNot operates a fleet of zero-emission electric trucks and offers a subscription service for both residents and businesses. It’s not a one-way street, though. Twice each year, WasteNot trucks haul nutrient-rich compost back to customers to enrich the soil.  40th Ward Alderman Andre Vasquez praised the new initiative, commenting, “I think Clark Street Composts is a shining example of a community and partner such as the Chamber showing leadership that puts our planet first. It creates a model the rest of the city should look to so that we can be not only forward-thinking, but forward-acting!” + WasteNot Photography by Jamie Kelter Davis

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Clark Street Composts sets example for Chicago and beyond

A green remodel gave this 1950s home major treehouse vibes

September 13, 2021 by  
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Your home might be cozy, but nothing compares to the fun of a childhood treehouse . Hazel Road Residence combines modern home design with treehouse vibes to showcase the best of both worlds. Completed by Oakland -based firm Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design, this project transformed a 1950s residence into a gorgeous family home with sustainable features. Located in Berkeley, California , this house began its life in 1952 as a 1,714-square-foot structure. Bringing the home’s “good bones” into the modern era took thoughtful planning. Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design started the transformation with a kitchen remodel in 2012. Warm wood cabinets echo the trees outdoors, while steel appliances keep the kitchen looking modern and fresh. This remodel also laid the groundwork for an upstairs addition, completed with the help of IDA Structural Engineers and Jetton Construction, Inc. The project was completed in 2018. Related: Residential building from the ’60s gets an energy-efficient remodel Now a 2,392-square-foot home, Hazel Road can comfortably house a family with kids. But more space isn’t the only welcoming element to the updated house. As stated in a project description, a “unifying concept to the project was to use the yard to greater effect.” This is where Hazel Road’s “tree-house feel” comes into play. The green yard features inviting wood and concrete stairs leading up to a deck shaded by a gorgeous Magnolia tree. Flush sliders added to the family room/kitchen blur the barrier between indoor and outdoor spaces . Continuing to bring the outdoors in, windows throughout the home frame views of the tree. This includes the upstairs master bedroom’s full-wall sliding windows with an ‘invisible’ glass safety rail. Sustainability features reinforce the home’s green perspective. For example, spray foam insulation and energy-efficient LED lighting were used throughout the structure. Exterior shades and deep overhangs control both glare and western light to minimize solar gain. The residence also includes a “state of the art rainscreen wall” with cementitious panel siding. + Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design Photography by Cesar Rubio, Matthew Millman and Buttrick Projects A+D

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A green remodel gave this 1950s home major treehouse vibes

Baserange goes the extra mile for eco-friendly clothing production

August 20, 2021 by  
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The key to any successful business is the partnerships made along the way. For Baserange, its goal to manage a transparent, ethical and environmentally -friendly garment company is supported by a network of similarly-minded factories. Baserange was started in 2012 by Blandine Legait and Marie-Louise Mogensen. The original product line focused on undergarments, but the collection now includes an assortment of clothing options. With the focus on diversity, inclusion and natural beauty for the customer, the intimates and basics line matches that philosophy with a dedication to working with sustainable manufacturing facilities. Related: KADA’s sustainable clothing line is designed to empower women Up and down the collection, careful material selection means finding producers who rely on traditional techniques while providing  natural materials  that are soft, breathable and comfortable. With this in mind, Baserange obtains silk and linen from a second-generation family-operated factory in Turkey dedicated to checking supply certifications and creating materials that are long-lasting yet compostable at the end of their usable life.  Another family-owned factory in Porto, Portugal highlights fair trade working conditions and support of working women. The factory relies on renewable energy and works directly with Baserange to make the most of material  waste  saying, “They’ll do a set with just those leftover colors. Once we did bras with a cup in one color, a cup in another color, and the elastic in a third color.” Another textile mill, in France, relies on 80%  solar power  to run the factory. The buildings are made from reclaimed lumber from the surrounding area.  This close working relationship with nearby producers has resulted in an eco-friendly life cycle for Baserange’s clothing, starting with the fact that regular visits to the factories have a low transport footprint. The dyes are OEKO-TEX certified. The cotton is GOTS certified. The bamboo fabrics are FSC certified . Other natural fibers used in the clothing line include silk, linen and wool sourced in traditional ways to make yarn from yak, alpaca and mohair.  In a statement, the company summarized saying, “Baserange offerings are produced with respect for the environment and people. They are committed to clean production and ethical sourcing to minimize the environmental impact on both the producer and the wearer of the garments.”  + Baserange Images via Baserange 

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Baserange goes the extra mile for eco-friendly clothing production

Explore the Saltbox Passive House’s sweet sustainable design

August 20, 2021 by  
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The Saltbox Passive House is located in Bromont, Quebec , and is a residence for a family of four. The 3100-square-foot home sits in a meadow at the edge of a 2.5-acre wooded plot. Its design combines elements of the local context with energy-efficient strategies to enhance sustainability while maintaining a modern aesthetic. Through the efforts of the architects from Atelier l’Abri, the contractor Construction Rocket and consultants from the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS), the building has obtained LEED Platinum and PHIUS 2018+ certifications, making it the third certified passive house in Quebec. The architects employed an L-shaped plan with two different roof slopes that mirror the topography of the landscape. The name of the house stems from the architectural language of saltbox buildings, a form of vernacular architecture from New England . The primary characteristic of saltbox houses is a gable roof over the main section of the building with a single-pitch roof over the lower section, making them easy to identify at first glance. Related: Passive House-certified residence frames ski resort views in Utah The Saltbox Passive House comprises three levels, of which the bottom two are tucked into the mountain along the rear retaining wall. The basement level serves as a workshop and houses a garage. The ground level includes shared spaces for the family. This includes living and dining spaces, which are organized around a double-height volume encompassing the kitchen, pantry, mudroom and powder room. This volume extends to the top level and is adjacent to the passageway that leads to the private spaces, including the three bedrooms and a home office. Throughout the design process, the architects collaborated with consultants to ensure that the project met Passivhaus Institut standards. Established in the early 1980s in Germany, the institute promotes buildings that consider occupant comfort while maintaining high levels of energy efficiency. This is often achieved through the use of well-insulated interiors, extensive heat recovery from mechanical ventilation systems and conscious design of openings for thermal comfort. Several design choices were made to ensure high performance without compromising comfort and aesthetics. The house incorporates south-facing, triple-glazed UPVC openings to capture sunlight and frame views of the lush landscape while serving as a means of passive solar heating. Close attention to materiality has further reduced the building’s carbon footprint. Cellulose insulation, excavated stone for the retaining wall and cedar cladding are all readily available in the region and aid in keeping the house thermally insulated. Though the building is connected to public electricity systems and utilities, its enhanced environmentally friendly measures reduce dependence on these facilities. + L’Abri Photography by Raphaël Thibodeau

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Explore the Saltbox Passive House’s sweet sustainable design

House Lhotka brings energy-efficient home design to the Czech Republic

August 11, 2021 by  
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Sustainable construction is on the mind of builders, architects, engineers, residential homeowners and businesses around the world. A project by SOA architekti in collaboration with Richter Design reflects this mindset with  green design  elements and privacy in an open and well-lit home.  Located at Lhotka Prague 4 in the Czech Republic , House Lhotka is unique in the creation of a large home with an easily identifiable and functional central space. The house is purposely divided into four volumes with the dining room at the heart of it and a corridor that connects them all. Related: Minimalist House in Minohshinmachi focuses on nature Designers selected  natural materials  where possible with a reliance on wood and sand-lime bricks. These elements also work to connect the outdoors with the indoors, such as the wooden ceiling in the dining room that flows through to a terrace, garden and pool areas. Large windows and moveable glass partitions marry the central part of the home with the outdoor living space while inviting in copious  natural light  and ventilation. With attention to energy efficiency, heating is provided through a heat pump and a gas boiler for additional support. Radiant cooling is built into the ceiling to help control interior temperatures. Likewise, efficient underfloor heating makes the space more comfortable.  A statement by the development team explains, “Air exchange is provided by a pressure-controlled ventilation system with passive heat recuperation with high efficiency. The intensity of ventilation is controlled automatically using CO2. In the summertime, the system is used for night pre-cooling of the building operating at a higher intensity.” To keep all this in check, a smart system monitors activities and makes adjustments as needed.   From the northeast entrance, the central corridor leads to a garage and study with views of the  plants outside. The basement and second floor of the home provide plenty of space for the family with a master bedroom and three kid’s bedrooms.  For security, the home is mostly shielded from view from the street side, yet the large windows open the space up to the garden for a connection with the surrounding landscape without the need to hide from passersby. + SOA architekti Via ArchiScene Images via BoysPlayNice 

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House Lhotka brings energy-efficient home design to the Czech Republic

The Met Gala is featuring a fully vegan menu for 2021

August 11, 2021 by  
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When models, designers and Hollywood celebrities converge on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute for this year’s exclusive Met Gala, they’ll be snacking on a 100% vegan menu. Ten notable New York chefs will create the plant-based menu for  fashion’s  most prestigious charity event. If you’re more the sweatpants and t-shirt type, you might not know about this event that’s been called the Super Bowl of fashion. Since 1946, movers and shakers have been showing off their best red carpet fashions at the gala. Usually, it happens on the first Monday in May. But like so many things in the  pandemic  years, the schedule’s been pushed back. So on September 13, the beautiful people will descend on the costume institute dressed to express this year’s independence theme, In America: A Lexicon of Fashion. Related: PlantX partners with vegan superstar chef Matthew Kenney The 10 chefs selected by chef Marcus Samuelsson to bring something special to the plant-based party include Fariyal Abdullahi, Nasim Alikhani, Emma Bengtsson, Lazarus Lynch, Junghyun Park, Erik Ramirez, Thomas Raquel, Sophia Roe, Simone Tong and Fabian von Hauske. “We thought it was important to really talk about what’s present, what’s happening—how food is changing in America,” Samuelsson told Bon Appetit. “We want to be the future of American  food , of plant-based food. That conversation is happening now.” The chefs plan to raise further awareness of plant-based dishes by sharing some of their vegan recipes via Vogue’s Instagram account. PETA gave the Met Gala’s announcement two paws up. “Kindness to animals is as American as apple pie, so the new vegan menu is perfect for the gala’s ‘Americana’ theme, and it’s sure to set a trend for other fashion events to follow,” was the  animal rights  group’s official word. “PETA is celebrating the end of the  Meat Gala  and hopes to see attendees embrace earth and animal-friendly fashion, too—meaning no fur, leather, cashmere, wool, or feathers.” Via Green Matters , Vogue , Vegan Food & Living Lead image via Alan Light

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The Met Gala is featuring a fully vegan menu for 2021

I-N Beauty relies on science and plants for hair and skincare solutions

July 15, 2021 by  
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There was a time when personal care products came directly from the land, without chemicals or scientific labs. That’s not to say science is bad by any means. In fact, it’s incredibly helpful when it results in the development of everyday beauty products sourced from plants while still being effective for the consumer. This is I-N Beauty’s mission. I-N Beauty has ‘planted’ its business in both science and plants, and the innovations have led to a line of natural skincare, body and hair products. The foundation of the products comes from some scientific experimentation with over 225 ingredients sourced from seeds, the sea, plants and fruits. The entire product line is cruelty-free with no animal ingredients and is responsibly produced to minimize the impact on the environment. The company said, “We’re as obsessed with performance as we are with protecting the planet.” Related: Meejee sets sustainable goals for skincare with less plastic With that in mind, each product is proudly labeled with the ingredients and an explanation of their science-based functions. Plant materials are meticulously sourced using natural and organic options. Organic ratings are certified by a third party for transparency. Even the scents are plant-based, with 99% coming from certified-organic essential oils. The products are void of commonly controversial ingredients like parabens, harsh chemical sulfates, non-biodegradable silicones or aerosols. With a mission toward “meticulous selection of plant-derived, clinically proven, active ingredients [that] are always cruelty-free and responsibly produced,” it makes sense the company also aspires to make all packaging recyclable , too. The owners explained, “I-N is rooted in our love for plants and for the planet. We believe the only right and sensible solution to so many global problems is to embrace earth conscious, sustainable alternatives and plant-based over petroleum (and other synthetic or pseudo-natural) ingredients.” This family business is multigenerational, starting with a grandmother who was an herbalist, and Horst, the son who started his career as a stylist at age 14, later studying Ayurveda and its holistic healing methods. These experiences led him to launch an iconic brand in the natural beauty industry, Aveda. I-N Beauty was born in 2008 following the sale of Aveda, when Horst’s daughter, Nicole Rechelbacher, and co-owner Kiran Stordalen launched the world’s first USDA-certified organic haircare line. The I-N Beauty team carries on with Horst’s philosophy that, “What’s good for the earth is good for us. With advances in plant chemistry, there’s simply no reason to make products any other way.”  + I-N Beauty Images via I-N Beauty

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I-N Beauty relies on science and plants for hair and skincare solutions

I-N Beauty relies on science and plants for hair and skincare solutions

July 15, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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There was a time when personal care products came directly from the land, without chemicals or scientific labs. That’s not to say science is bad by any means. In fact, it’s incredibly helpful when it results in the development of everyday beauty products sourced from plants while still being effective for the consumer. This is I-N Beauty’s mission. I-N Beauty has ‘planted’ its business in both science and plants, and the innovations have led to a line of natural skincare, body and hair products. The foundation of the products comes from some scientific experimentation with over 225 ingredients sourced from seeds, the sea, plants and fruits. The entire product line is cruelty-free with no animal ingredients and is responsibly produced to minimize the impact on the environment. The company said, “We’re as obsessed with performance as we are with protecting the planet.” Related: Meejee sets sustainable goals for skincare with less plastic With that in mind, each product is proudly labeled with the ingredients and an explanation of their science-based functions. Plant materials are meticulously sourced using natural and organic options. Organic ratings are certified by a third party for transparency. Even the scents are plant-based, with 99% coming from certified-organic essential oils. The products are void of commonly controversial ingredients like parabens, harsh chemical sulfates, non-biodegradable silicones or aerosols. With a mission toward “meticulous selection of plant-derived, clinically proven, active ingredients [that] are always cruelty-free and responsibly produced,” it makes sense the company also aspires to make all packaging recyclable , too. The owners explained, “I-N is rooted in our love for plants and for the planet. We believe the only right and sensible solution to so many global problems is to embrace earth conscious, sustainable alternatives and plant-based over petroleum (and other synthetic or pseudo-natural) ingredients.” This family business is multigenerational, starting with a grandmother who was an herbalist, and Horst, the son who started his career as a stylist at age 14, later studying Ayurveda and its holistic healing methods. These experiences led him to launch an iconic brand in the natural beauty industry, Aveda. I-N Beauty was born in 2008 following the sale of Aveda, when Horst’s daughter, Nicole Rechelbacher, and co-owner Kiran Stordalen launched the world’s first USDA-certified organic haircare line. The I-N Beauty team carries on with Horst’s philosophy that, “What’s good for the earth is good for us. With advances in plant chemistry, there’s simply no reason to make products any other way.”  + I-N Beauty Images via I-N Beauty

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