The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

July 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

When a family approached AM Architecture wanting to turn their mid-century modern into a more spacious home with a stronger relationship to the outdoors, the firm had a tall order to fill. The large family wanted a bigger indoor living space to accommodate their numbers and an improved layout that would allow them to reconnect with nature. The result is the 5,920 square-foot Camberwell House in Melbourne . The firm redesigned the existing home and successfully created a comfortable space for the family that embraces indoor-outdoor living. To meet the family’s expectations, the architects created a split-level design for the living areas and re-centered the home’s entry to create a pavilion , which serves as a meeting place for the family and their guests. The pavilion structure has become a focal point of the house, incorporating key elements that serve as the centerpiece of any home: the kitchen, a dining space and living areas complete with a fireplace. To help foster a stronger connection to nature, the architects included large windows throughout the home. These windows, including the floor-to-ceiling glazing, utilize a low-E coating to help block heat in the summer and keep the house cozy and warm in the winter. Large internal brick walls also assist in regulating the indoor climate. Related: Mid-century Eichler home gets a bold remodel into the 21st century Furnishings are a futuristic take on mid-century style and blend well into the wood and glass materials that make up the family home. In the kitchen, cupboards provide plenty of storage space while also concealing appliances. An abundance of shelving proudly displays the residents’ knickknacks. In the living space, bare pendant lighting and a ceramic fireplace mimic the vertical placement of the home as well as nearby trees. The full-height windows fill the common areas with natural light . Thanks to their new location on a higher level in the home, bedrooms offer privacy and serenity for both kids and adults. From their beds, the family can look out to views of the backyard and nearby park. Although the home is two stories, the glass wall seamlessly integrates the two spaces. “This split level addition creates a dramatic new focal point in the house,” the architects said, “that connects all discrete parts of the house and introduces a dramatic relationship to its beautiful, natural surrounds.” + AM Architecture Images via Dianna Snape

Read more from the original source:
The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

This rammed-earth home features a beautiful, spiraling rooftop garden

July 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Japanese firm Ryuichi Ashizawa Architects has unveiled a beautiful round home that is wrapped in a spiraling rooftop garden. The family home, which is located on a remote Japanese island, was built out of woven bamboo lattice and clad with earthen walls . To create a strong connection between the home and nature, a spiraling garden that rises from the ground level provides optimal growing conditions for fresh vegetables and herbs that the family can enjoy year-round. Located on the remote island of Awaji, the home was built for a family of four. The architects designed it with an eye to withstandi the temperate climate on the island, but they also drew inspiration from the family’s nature-conscious lifestyle. Their first objective was to create a fertile area that could help feed the family year-round. Secondly, the master plan called for creating a closed-cycle landscape to make the home self-sufficient , enabling the family to live in harmony with the environment for years to come. Related: This striking concrete home uses mesh walls to connect with nature The architects began by creating a large circular frame out of woven bamboo lattice. They then clad the round form with Sanwa Earth finish. On the interior, they used a technique called Tataki to create a  hard-packed earthen floor  out of dirt, lime and water. The walls were also made out of packed earth . The combination of earthen walls and flooring provides a tight thermal envelope for the home. In winter, the walls and floors absorb heat, which is released at night, keeping the living space warm. In the hot summer months, the home’s stack effect layout (a height difference between the central space and the rest of the home) enables optimal air circulation to cool the interior. Inspired by the family’s eco-conscious lifestyle, the architects wanted to incorporate greenery into the already eco-friendly home design. Accordingly, the roof was turned into a spiral garden whose shape provides optimal growing conditions. Rising up from the ground level, the rooftop garden wraps around the home, providing a perfect blend of sun exposure and humidity to grow a variety of plants and vegetables. Rainwater soaks the top part of the garden, then flows downwards to a series of retaining ponds filled with aquatic plants. + Ryuichi Ashizawa Architects Photography by Kaori Ichikawa via Ryuichi Ashizawa Architects

See original here:
This rammed-earth home features a beautiful, spiraling rooftop garden

Solar-powered cube home in Australia hovers over the landscape

June 21, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered cube home in Australia hovers over the landscape

Optical illusions go hand-in-hand with architecture, but this tiny cube structure by  Matt Thitchener Architect  truly hovers over the landscape — with some help from embedded supports. Cantilevered on a hill, the North Avoca Studio is completely powered by the large array of  solar panels  on its roof. Located just southeast of New South Wales, North Avoca is an idyllic coastal neighborhood. Architect Matt Thitchener designed the 645-square-foot cube to be both an office and entertainment space for a family who primarily works from home. The studio is merely steps away from the family’s main residence. Related: Tiny Space-Age LoftCube Prefab Can Pop up Just About Anywhere The structural design of the studio was primarily influenced by the challenging landscape. Very steep terrain as well as limited building space required the team to embed 20-foot pillars into the bedrock to create a cantilevered design . Also due to the complexity of the location, building materials for the project had to be craned in piece by piece. The result, however, is a gorgeous multi-use space that looks out over the Pacific Ocean. Clad in dark corrugated Spandek panels, the exterior is modern and sleek. The otherwise monolithic structure is only interrupted by an entire glazed wall that provides the interior with natural light and breathtaking ocean views. The studio’s roof is covered in solar panels , which provide 100 percent of its energy. It’s also equipped with a rain harvesting system that is used to irrigate the garden planted under the structure. The interior of the home counts on an open floor plan to provide ultimate flexibility for different uses. The design is contemporary and airy, also providing an appropriate feel for any occasion. The space can be used as a work studio during the day, but can be easily be converted into an entertainment area for friends and family at night. + Matt Thitchener Architect Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Matt Thitchener Architect and Keith McInnes Photography

Read more:
Solar-powered cube home in Australia hovers over the landscape

Abandoned NYC warehouse is reinvented as LEED Gold-certified apartments

June 21, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Abandoned NYC warehouse is reinvented as LEED Gold-certified apartments

A new apartment complex infused with nature has taken root in New York City’s concrete jungle. Local design firm COOKFOX Architects completed 150 Charles Street, a residence that takes over the abandoned Whitehall warehouse on the Hudson River waterfront. Designed to blend in with the existing urban fabric, the modern building also boasts a low environmental footprint and LEED Gold certification. Located in the West Village, 150 Charles Street offers 91 residential units — including 10 individual three-story townhouses — on an approximately one-acre lot. Built to incorporate a pre-1960 warehouse , the building preserves the warehouse streetwall and the original material palette of concrete, brick and glass. Greenery is embedded throughout the building from the lush central courtyard to the cascading planted terraces and green rooftops that overlook waterfront views for a total of 30,000 square feet of landscaped space. Dirtworks, PC led 150 Charles Street’s landscape design. “Incorporating ideas of biophilia  — our inherent connection to the environment — access to nature throughout the building is related to themes of prospect (wide, open views) and refuge (safe and protected interior spaces),” COOKFOX Architects wrote. “150 Charles combines the best of the West Village townhouse garden view and the waterfront high-rise river view with cascading terraces designed as a ‘fifth façade.’” Related: Sneak a peek inside Pacific Park’s first greenery-enveloped residences in COOKFOX’s new video In addition to abundant greenery that features native and adaptive species, the apartment complex earned its LEED Gold certification with a variety of energy-efficient and resource-saving features. The team reduced construction waste and used locally sourced, recyclable and recycled building materials. The building is wrapped in a highly insulated envelope and fitted with smart building systems to optimize energy use. The units are equipped with Energy Star appliances. Rainwater is harvested and is reused as landscape irrigation. The outdoor air is also filtered for 95 percent particulates. + COOKFOX Architects Images by Frank Oudeman

The rest is here:
Abandoned NYC warehouse is reinvented as LEED Gold-certified apartments

Tiny seahorse trapped in fishing line gets a second chance

June 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tiny seahorse trapped in fishing line gets a second chance

A tiny seahorse named Frito received a second chance at life after being trapped in fishing line. Florida resident Dawn McCartney said she and her two daughters were snorkeling when they found a rope and plastic trash in the water. Among the debris, the family saw a small seahorse with fishing line wrapped around her neck multiple times. McCartney called the Clearwater Marine Aquarium (CMA), who came to the seahorse’s rescue . Frito, a female lined seahorse, was rescued last weekend, on June 10. McCartney carefully untangled the seahorse and put her in a water bottle filled with ocean water until the CMA rescue team could come pick up Frito. CMA, an animal rescue center, rehabilitated the seahorse, whom they described as their smallest rescue yet , and were able to return her to a seagrass bed in the wild on June 14. Related: Floridians rescue manatees stranded on shores drained by Irma “Our mission of rescue, rehabilitation and release applies to all marine life, big and small,” CMA CEO David Yates said in a statement . “The level of care our team gave to tiny Frito is inspiring. It is so rewarding to get her back home.” (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Release of Frito, the Tiny Seahorse Frito, the tiny seahorse is going home! Join us in welcoming home our smallest rescue patient as she is released into the wild! #CMAinspires Posted by Clearwater Marine Aquarium on Thursday, June 14, 2018 CMA said Frito’s rescue story is similar to that of other animals they’ve rescued — the creatures were tangled in fishing line. Monofilament fishing line drifting in ocean waves could endanger many species of marine life such as sea turtles , birds , stingrays, dolphins … and tiny seahorses. CMA said people can lower the chances of animal entanglement simply by cleaning up fishing line and disposing of it back at a dock. In a 2017 blog post , CMA offered other suggestions for fishers who want to help keep marine life safe, such as using barbless circle hooks or recycling monofilament fishing line. While non-monofilament line and hooks can’t be placed in the recycling bins for monofilament lines, fishers can cut the sharp point off hooks and cut non-monofilament line into pieces 12 inches or smaller before putting those in covered trash cans to help protect marine animals. + Frito the Seahorse + Clearwater Marine Aquarium Images courtesy of Clearwater Marine Aquarium

The rest is here:
Tiny seahorse trapped in fishing line gets a second chance

Are Family-Owned Businesses Kinder to the Earth?

May 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco

Comments Off on Are Family-Owned Businesses Kinder to the Earth?

Who doesn’t like the idea of a family-owned business? There’s … The post Are Family-Owned Businesses Kinder to the Earth? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read the original:
Are Family-Owned Businesses Kinder to the Earth?

Sleep beneath the Milky Way in Bubble Domes in Ireland

April 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sleep beneath the Milky Way in Bubble Domes in Ireland

Want to wake up in the great Irish outdoors without compromising comfort? These luxurious Bubble Domes at Finn Lough promise a cozy night beneath the stars with luxurious touches to boot. Located on a 45-acre peninsula in Fermanagh, Northern Ireland , these transparent domes offer 180-degree views of the forest as well as bespoke, Scandinavian-inspired interiors. Designed and built by Dome Experience , the Bubble Domes at Finn Lough are one of four accommodation types offered by the family-run resort. The futuristic domes , which sleep two, are perfect as a romantic getaway and digital detox destination—the domes do not have wifi or cell service. Kept inflated with an air pressure system, each dome features underfloor heating, a four-poster bed, Nespresso coffee machine, and a smaller annex bubble housing the ensuite bathroom. Related: CasaBubble’s inflatable prefab domes let you enjoy 360 degree views of nature in comfort Guests can choose between the standard Forest Bubble Dome or the larger Premium Bubble Dome, which includes a tub and other special furnishings. Each dome is accessed via a private path. Pricing for the Bubble Domes start at £245 ($345) a night . + Finn Lough Via Dwell Images via Finn Lough

Read more from the original source: 
Sleep beneath the Milky Way in Bubble Domes in Ireland

This amazing renovated school bus is a bright, airy home for a family of six

March 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This amazing renovated school bus is a bright, airy home for a family of six

Converting an old school bus into a living space is never an easy task – but when you’re trying to create enough room for a family of six, the project becomes a whole ‘nother beast. When Gabriel and Debbie Mayes began to embark on their skoolie refurb, they knew it would have to accommodate themselves as well as their four children for years to come. The result is an amazing, light-filled home on wheels that has plenty of living and storage space for the entire family. The Mayes Team began their renovation by buying an 250-square-foot, 2000 Thomas High Top with the seats still intact. Excited as they were about their new adventure, the ambitious couple soon discovered that the old bus was a “rust bucket.” However, they moved forward by gutting the entire interior, and creating a specific layout that would meet their needs. Related: Traveling family renovates old school bus as both solar-powered home and hostel After months of hard work, the family managed to convert the old bus into a comfy 250 square feet of living space by using several space-efficient tactics. Instead of creating a long, shotgun type of home, for example, the wanted to separate the living space from the bedrooms. Putting the living room towards the front of the bus, they created a natural barrier with an L-shaped kitchen, which blocks the view of the sleeping area in the back of the bus. For the sleeping area, the kids have four bunk beds positioned over the wheel wells, with the parents’ bedroom at the very back of the bus. The bed was positioned over the engine, leaving enough room for clothing storage underneath, again making use of every inch of available space. Upon entry, the living space is divided into two sides, with two couches on either side that can fit the entire family. The couches can also fold out into a full bed for guests. The interior design scheme revolves around predominantly black, white, and grey tones, giving the interior a polished look. Using white walls creates an airy, spacious interior, which is enhanced by various large windows that flood the space with natural light . The design also incorporates various wood accents to add a sense of warmth to the design. As is the case with most tiny living spaces, creative storage solutions were essential in this project, especially with a large family. Throughout the bus conversion, hidden drawers and cupboards were installed in every available inch of space. The team installed storage under the couch and even a shoe shelf by the front door. According to the family, these areas are incredibly helpful to help the big family avoid clutter, “This has been such a blessing and has helped us to keep the bus organized.” The family, who is now “parked” in California while the kids go to school, posts updates about the project and their travels on their website and Instagram . + The Mayes Team Via Dwell Images via The Mayes Team

View original here: 
This amazing renovated school bus is a bright, airy home for a family of six

Pre-industrial carbon found in Canadian Arctic waters

March 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Pre-industrial carbon found in Canadian Arctic waters

Old or possibly ancient carbon is being released from Arctic soils, according to new evidence cited by The Washington Post . The work is an indicator that permafrost thaw could be aggravating the issue of climate change — although the paper said scientists are debating how much ancient carbon Arctic soils would discharge normally. Study lead author Joshua Dean of Vrije University told The Washington Post, “I would say if you’re looking at anything pushing several hundred years old to a thousand years old, then you have to start wondering whether that should be coming out of this kind of system.” A team of researchers from institutions in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands utilized radiocarbon dating on the content of waters in the Northwest Territories of Canada and found what they described as abundant pre-industrial carbon in research published late February in the journal Environmental Research Letters . They hoped to establish a basic measurement, according to The Washington Post, of the amount of old carbon flowing into Northwest Territories waters. Further research will be necessary to pin down whether the amounts of old carbon are unusual or not. Related: Why Alaska’s vanishing permafrost worries researchers Anna Liljedahl, a University of Alaska at Fairbanks professor who wasn’t part of the study, told The Washington Post when it comes to this area of research, a smoking gun is elusive due to cryoturbation, which means, “a mixing of soil layers due to seasonal freeze and thaw process, brings old carbon up and young carbon down into the soil column.” She did say she thought these scientists were on to something, and more studies would bolster the evidence. Dean said the study can’t prove the Arctic has altered to put out more older carbon, but the results are still worrying. He told The Washington Post, “Clearly it’s a warning sign for the future.” + Environmental Research Letters Via The Washington Post Images via Depositphotos and Good Free Photos

See original here:
Pre-industrial carbon found in Canadian Arctic waters

Volkswagen I.D. Vizzion electric sedan concept takes aim at Tesla’s Model S

February 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Volkswagen I.D. Vizzion electric sedan concept takes aim at Tesla’s Model S

With a driving range of 413 miles, Volkswagen’s latest concept sedan aims to beat the Tesla Model S at its own game. Volkswagen has released teaser photos of its new I.D. Vizzion concept, and it features a fully-autonomous system that lets passengers sit back and let the car do the driving. The I.D. Vizzion concept is the latest from the family of I.D. electric cars that VW has released, which started with the I.D. hatchback in late 2016. While the previous I.D. concepts have been previews of VW’s future electric models, the I.D. Vizzion takes it a step further by being the first to feature fully autonomous technology, which VW is going to debut next month at the Geneva Motor Show . Related: Volkswagen may offer more electric cars than any other brand Inside the I.D. Vizzion doesn’t have a steering wheel or pedals. Instead a “digital chauffer” is responsible for piloting the vehicle. The concept car drives, steers and navigates autonomously in traffic, while the passengers are given the freedom to do other tasks. The I.D. Vizzion concept also features a virtual host, which the passengers can interact with via voice or gesture controls. The system also automatically knows the personal preferences of the passengers. The I.D. Vizzion concept is the largest of all the I.D. concepts and previews a premium electric sedan. The concept is powered by two electric motors that generate a combined 302 horsepower that’s sent to all four wheels. A 111 kWh lithium-ion battery gives the concept a driving range up to 413 miles. VW has yet to announce when the production version of the I.D. Vizzion concept will arrive, but the first I.D. model, the hatchback, will go on sale in 2020. The electric hatchback will then be followed by the I.D. Crozz electric SUV and then the microbus-inspired I.D. Buzz . By 2025 VW plans to introduce more than 20 electric vehicles. +Volkswagen All images © Volkswagen

Here is the original:
Volkswagen I.D. Vizzion electric sedan concept takes aim at Tesla’s Model S

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 7305 access attempts in the last 7 days.